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HP printers are they worth the money?

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Anonymous
a b α HP
July 28, 2005 6:17:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

HP: OK... more expensive.
But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
printers.
Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
most other makes.
But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec models,
you only have two ink cartridges.
So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
other colours.
If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
terms of costs??

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Thanks.


OM

More about : printers worth money

July 28, 2005 4:18:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky mailbox.

Or live in a place that rains often... like Washington... or the UK for
that matter :p .

But come to think about it... my old cheaffer pen has less of an issue
than many inkjets. The funny thing about writing with a fountain pen
is the text is bigger and rain drops for the most part remain relativly
the same size. Fountain pen written addresses if they get hit with a
few drops of water might smuge out a bit of a single letter but you can
still make out the the majority of the address even if you didn't take
the time to wait for the ink to dry before mailing. But this was
mainly an issue when the cartrage pens came out... 19th century
american post offices sold ink they reccomended for mailing, but they
stopped because pen makers claimed that postal ink would clog their
pens. 12 point type on the other hand a drop will blot out entire
letters, address numbers, and zip codes.

Come to think about it, ball point pens including bic are also ink
based and have less of an issue than many an inkjet printer. The point
is it's not silly to consider an ink that is water resistant for
mailing stuff.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 28, 2005 7:49:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

HP PRINTERS ARE GENERALLY VERY GOOD. STAY AWAY FROM THE MODELS THAT
HAVE 3 CARTS WITH ONLY 2 CART SLOTS. YOU WILL BE PLAYING MUSICAL CARTS.

I ALSO HAVE A CANON IP4000. IT IS BETTER ON PHOTOS AND ALMOST AS GOOD
ON BUSINESS DOCUMENTS BUT MUCH FASTER ON BOTH AND MUCH CHEAPER TO RUN.
IT ALSO HAS TWIN PAPER FEEDS AND BOTH PROVIDE ME WITH DUPLEX PRINTING.

OM wrote:

>HP: OK... more expensive.
>But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
>printers.
>Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
>most other makes.
>But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec models,
>you only have two ink cartridges.
>So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
>other colours.
>If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
>terms of costs??
>
>Any feedback would be appreciated.
>
>Thanks.
>
>
>OM
>
>
>
Related resources
July 28, 2005 11:09:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine.

England?
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 28, 2005 11:33:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet printing.
Notice how address information on magazines is prone to smearing if it gets
wet.

Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was it
OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it? Were the nibs on
the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the ink sold through a mail order
catalog and did they state who made the ink and was it a brand name? <g>
--
Ron

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122578285.352419.211870@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky mailbox.
>
> Or live in a place that rains often... like Washington... or the UK for
> that matter :p .
>
> But come to think about it... my old cheaffer pen has less of an issue
> than many inkjets. The funny thing about writing with a fountain pen
> is the text is bigger and rain drops for the most part remain relativly
> the same size. Fountain pen written addresses if they get hit with a
> few drops of water might smuge out a bit of a single letter but you can
> still make out the the majority of the address even if you didn't take
> the time to wait for the ink to dry before mailing. But this was
> mainly an issue when the cartrage pens came out... 19th century
> american post offices sold ink they reccomended for mailing, but they
> stopped because pen makers claimed that postal ink would clog their
> pens. 12 point type on the other hand a drop will blot out entire
> letters, address numbers, and zip codes.
>
> Come to think about it, ball point pens including bic are also ink
> based and have less of an issue than many an inkjet printer. The point
> is it's not silly to consider an ink that is water resistant for
> mailing stuff.
>
July 28, 2005 11:33:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ron Cohen wrote:
> The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet printing.
> Notice how address information on magazines is prone to smearing if it gets
> wet.
>
> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was it
> OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
> tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it? Were the nibs on
> the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the ink sold through a mail order
> catalog and did they state who made the ink and was it a brand name? <g>

I believe at that point in time all ink came from India (pronounced
in-giah). :-)
Frank
July 29, 2005 12:01:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was it
> OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
> tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it?

19th century was the rebirth of the bronze nub and the invention steel
nub... both of which were a tad better than quills esp the steel nub
which was more flexable. Probally the most common forumlation was lamp
black and kerosene, but just solvent including water would do well..
..it just so happened to be the by product of kerosene lamps so might as
well save your self a trip and use kerosene with the waste to make ink.
It wasn't until 1867 that the first patent for a fountain pen was
granted in america... one of the major stumbling blocks was unlike quil
or nub pens corosive ink would cause most things to decay and the pen
wouldn't work anymore. This is where OEM ink was born. Later on in
that century we had the stylographic pens.... while not so good for
calligraphy were perfect for technical writing. these were basicly
hollow pens with a port near the base that you could use an eye dropper
and a hollow tube at the end about .5mm in diamater.. small enough so
the 10 to 15 drops of ink would be held in place by surface tention but
large enough that ink would flow out of the pen when you wrote. These
worked ok with lamp black based inks so long as you used a sewing
needle to clean them out from time to time. The really nice self
filling pens were mass produced early 20th century known as the
crescent filling... as well as the very popular cartridge filled pens
by Sheaffer. This was the apex of the OEM ink market... while you
could refil those Sheaffer cartidges, it was a pain in the tookus.
Later on in the last part of the first quarter of the 20th century came
the Pelikan piston filling pens which were far easier than the crescent
fillers but these were for odd ball tinkerers that didn't want to pay
extra for ink cartidges. As an added bonus Pelikan actually worked
well with pigmented ink.and got a few patents on their exclusive ink
forumlation. You could save a few bucks going with an international
cartidge by the likes of Bexley or Tombrow, but you the consumer ran
the risk of clogging your pen esp if you used pigmented inks in a pen
that simply wasn't designed for it. It was rumored that all the ink
came pretty much from the same place, but there was always someone who
felt that buying Sheaffer ink for a Sheaffer pen was the best and only
solution.

So remember kids... when using your fountain pen remember when you
charge cartidges always purge the old ink first by removing the nib and
plaing it under lukewarm water and whip dry. Keep your nibs free from
dust and dirt. Remember the nib structure and ink delivery system are
complex and require the use of OEM to prevent clogging. This assures
long live and instant readiness. Avoid jarring or shaking your pen and
be sure that the cap is on right when it is not in use. The best way
to carry your pen is nib pointing upwards.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 1:39:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what the
formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that refilling a
fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>
--
Ron

"Frank" <fb@notspam.com> wrote in message
news:4mbGe.158977$go.51903@fed1read05...
> Ron Cohen wrote:
>> The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet
>> printing. Notice how address information on magazines is prone to
>> smearing if it gets wet.
>>
>> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was
>> it OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they
>> wouldn't tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it? Were
>> the nibs on the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the ink sold
>> through a mail order catalog and did they state who made the ink and was
>> it a brand name? <g>
>
> I believe at that point in time all ink came from India (pronounced
> in-giah). :-)
> Frank
July 29, 2005 1:39:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ron Cohen wrote:
> But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what the
> formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that refilling a
> fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>

hehehe...I doubt it.
Frank
July 29, 2005 3:23:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Do not worry too much about the fact that the colour cartridge has
three colours and that any one can run out ahead of the others. If
other HP cartridges are the same as those for the 6122, the ink is
held in a spongy material in the colour cartridges. You can fill
these cartridges very easily if you go slowly. Do not forget to
leave a vent for each compartment. I leave the HP vented plugs in
position and drill a hole into each compartment for filling. After
filling I cover each of these holes with plastic tape.

Filling the black cartridges is quite another story! Not really
difficult once you ahve grasped the cunning pressure control system.
For sealing the black cartridges I recommend gripping the sides of
the case with a clamp to reduce the volume of the reservoir then
sealing the filling hole with a small piece of plastic tape covered
over and sealed round the edges with epoxy resin. When the resin
has hardened, remove the clamp and a slight vacuum is produced
internally. It works.

Peter
On 28 Jul 2005 02:17:16 -0700, "OM" <om.newsgroup@gmail.com> wrote:

>HP: OK... more expensive.
>But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
>printers.
>Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
>most other makes.
>But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec models,
>you only have two ink cartridges.
>So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
>other colours.
>If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
>terms of costs??
>
>Any feedback would be appreciated.
>
>Thanks.
>
>
>OM
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 3:55:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ron Cohen wrote:

>The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet printing.
>Notice how address information on magazines is prone to smearing if it gets
>wet.
>
>Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was it
>OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
>tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it? Were the nibs on
>the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the ink sold through a mail order
>catalog and did they state who made the ink and was it a brand name? <g>
>
>

IT WAS A NIB ON YOU FINDER AFTER YOU REMOVED IS FROM YOUR UNDERSIDE AND
GAVE IT A SNIFF ;-)
July 29, 2005 3:55:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> Ron Cohen wrote:
>
>> The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet
>> printing. Notice how address information on magazines is prone to
>> smearing if it gets wet.
>>
>> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing.
>> Was it OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where
>> they wouldn't tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made
>> it? Were the nibs on the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the
>> ink sold through a mail order catalog and did they state who made the
>> ink and was it a brand name? <g>
>>
>>
>
> IT WAS A NIB ON YOU FINDER AFTER YOU REMOVED IS FROM YOUR UNDERSIDE AND
> GAVE IT A SNIFF ;-)

hahahaha...abuse@prodigy.net. You'll never learn cause you're a
certified moron and a complete idiot. You ISP will be the enforcer for
your bullshit psycho postings.
Gott'ca!
Frank
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 3:55:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> Ron Cohen wrote:
>
>> The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet
>> printing. Notice how address information on magazines is prone to
>> smearing if it gets wet.
>>
>> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing.
>> Was it OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where
>> they wouldn't tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made
>> it? Were the nibs on the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the
>> ink sold through a mail order catalog and did they state who made the
>> ink and was it a brand name? <g>
>
>
> I believe at that point in time all ink came from India (pronounced
> in-giah). :-)
> Frank


WHY DON'T YOU GO THERE
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 4:00:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ron Cohen wrote:

>But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what the
>formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that refilling a
>fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>
>
>

I THINK YOU SHOULD USE AN AFTERMARKET CONDOM
July 29, 2005 4:00:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> Ron Cohen wrote:
>
>> But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what the
>> formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that
>> refilling a fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>
>>
>>
>
> I THINK YOU SHOULD USE AN AFTERMARKET CONDOM

Thanks. abuse@prodigy.net
Got any more you moron.
Frank
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 4:01:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> Ron Cohen wrote:
>
>> But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what the
>> formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that
>> refilling a fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>
>
>
> hehehe...I doubt it.
> Frank


hehehe...I doubt it. OR HAHAHA...I doubt it.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 4:04:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Peter wrote:

>Do not worry too much about the fact that the colour cartridge has
>three colours and that any one can run out ahead of the others. If
>other HP cartridges are the same as those for the 6122, the ink is
>held in a spongy material in the colour cartridges. You can fill
>these cartridges very easily if you go slowly.
>

BAD ADVICE. A REAL MESSY PAIN IN THE ASS. AND IF IT LEAKS IN YOUR PRINTER

GREAT GOGAMOOGA LET ME OTTA HERE

>Do not forget to
>leave a vent for each compartment. I leave the HP vented plugs in
>position and drill a hole
>
USE A CONDOM BEFORE YOU DRILL THE HOLE

>into each compartment for filling. After
>filling I cover each of these holes with plastic tape.
>
>Filling the black cartridges is quite another story! Not really
>difficult once you ahve grasped the cunning pressure control system.
>For sealing the black cartridges I recommend gripping the sides of
>the case with a clamp to reduce the volume of the reservoir then
>sealing the filling hole with a small piece of plastic tape covered
>over and sealed round the edges with epoxy resin. When the resin
>has hardened, remove the clamp and a slight vacuum is produced
>internally. It works.
>
>

BOY THE PAIN IN THE ASS AND MESS IS GROWING

>Peter
>On 28 Jul 2005 02:17:16 -0700, "OM" <om.newsgroup@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>>HP: OK... more expensive.
>>But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
>>printers.
>>Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
>>most other makes.
>>But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec models,
>>you only have two ink cartridges.
>>So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
>>other colours.
>>If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
>>terms of costs??
>>
>>Any feedback would be appreciated.
>>
>>Thanks.
>>
>>
>>OM
>>
>>
>
>
>
July 29, 2005 4:04:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> Peter wrote:
>
>> Do not worry too much about the fact that the colour cartridge has
>> three colours and that any one can run out ahead of the others. If
>> other HP cartridges are the same as those for the 6122, the ink is
>> held in a spongy material in the colour cartridges. You can fill
>> these cartridges very easily if you go slowly.
>
>
> BAD ADVICE. A REAL MESSY PAIN IN THE ASS. AND IF IT LEAKS IN YOUR PRINTER
>
> GREAT GOGAMOOGA LET ME OTTA HERE
>
>> Do not forget to
>> leave a vent for each compartment. I leave the HP vented plugs in
>> position and drill a hole
>
> USE A CONDOM BEFORE YOU DRILL THE HOLE
>
>> into each compartment for filling. After
>> filling I cover each of these holes with plastic tape.
>>
>> Filling the black cartridges is quite another story! Not really
>> difficult once you ahve grasped the cunning pressure control system.
>> For sealing the black cartridges I recommend gripping the sides of
>> the case with a clamp to reduce the volume of the reservoir then
>> sealing the filling hole with a small piece of plastic tape covered
>> over and sealed round the edges with epoxy resin. When the resin
>> has hardened, remove the clamp and a slight vacuum is produced
>> internally. It works.
>>
>>
>
> BOY THE PAIN IN THE ASS AND MESS IS GROWING
>
>> Peter
>> On 28 Jul 2005 02:17:16 -0700, "OM" <om.newsgroup@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> HP: OK... more expensive.
>>> But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
>>> printers.
>>> Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
>>> most other makes.
>>> But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec models,
>>> you only have two ink cartridges.
>>> So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
>>> other colours.
>>> If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
>>> terms of costs??
>>>
>>> Any feedback would be appreciated.
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>>
>>>
>>> OM
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

We all see that you're wacko again you pathetic loser.
Get lost.
We don't need your kind.
Frank
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 5:04:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

OM wrote:

> HP: OK... more expensive.
> But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the
> best printers.
> Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me:
> quiter than most other makes.
> But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower
> spec models, you only have two ink cartridges.
> So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless
> of the other colours.
> If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other
> printers in terms of costs??
>
> Any feedback would be appreciated.

After buying a new Epson RX630 with 6 carts, I find that I
prefer to use my old 2-cart HP 710c Deskjet for a number of
reasons.

I believe that printing is cheaper on the HP. The Epson purges
too much ink from all carts regularly. Ink usage is more even
than I anticipated over the 5 colour carts. And because a
major purge happens on _any_ cart replacement, it pays to
replace all low carts at the same time anyway.

I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable. In
this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and I'm
sorry I bought it.

I mainly use greyscale on the HP to save the colour cart. And I
refill the black cart with Inktec ink a few times before buying
a new HP 45 cart. The Inktec refill system is great - easy to
use, no spillage, and the ink is waterproof and at least as
good as the genuine HP. I had previously tried a Calidad
refill, and found it unsatisfactory in all respects:
ease-of-use, print quality, and waterproofness.

I have now purchased an Inktec colour refill kit for the HP, but
haven't used it yet so I can't comment on it meaningfully.

John
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 5:04:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
<jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:

> I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
> buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
> absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
> little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable. In
> this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and I'm
> sorry I bought it.

John-

You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen replaced the
older fountain pen in common useage. With the fountain pen, there was
every bit as much a problem of water damage as with any inkjet printer
today, yet the mail system survived!

Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky mailbox.

By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some dye-based inks
are better than others when exposed to water.

Fred
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:35:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Ron Cohen wrote:
>>
>>> But was it branded or unbranded India ink and did they state what
>>> the formulation was? And besides that, didn't everyone know that
>>> refilling a fountain pen was a pain in the a**? <g>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I THINK YOU SHOULD USE AN AFTERMARKET CONDOM
>
>
> Thanks. abuse@prodigy.net
> Got any more you moron.
> Frank

Thanks. abuse@earthlink.net
Got any more you moron.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:36:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Ron Cohen wrote:
>>
>>> The bulk mailing industry makes extensive use of high speed inkjet
>>> printing. Notice how address information on magazines is prone to
>>> smearing if it gets wet.
>>>
>>> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing.
>>> Was it OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where
>>> they wouldn't tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made
>>> it? Were the nibs on the pens OEM or aftermarket and was any of the
>>> ink sold through a mail order catalog and did they state who made
>>> the ink and was it a brand name? <g>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> IT WAS A NIB ON YOU FINDER AFTER YOU REMOVED IS FROM YOUR UNDERSIDE
>> AND GAVE IT A SNIFF ;-)
>
>
> hahahaha...abuse@prodigy.net. You'll never learn cause you're a
> certified moron and a complete idiot. You ISP will be the enforcer for
> your bullshit psycho postings.
> Gott'ca!
> Frank

hehehehehe...abuse@earthlink.net. You'll never learn cause you're a
certified moron and a complete idiot. You ISP will be the enforcer for
your bullshit psycho postings.
Gott'ca!
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:38:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Peter wrote:
>>
>>> Do not worry too much about the fact that the colour cartridge has
>>> three colours and that any one can run out ahead of the others. If
>>> other HP cartridges are the same as those for the 6122, the ink is
>>> held in a spongy material in the colour cartridges. You can fill
>>> these cartridges very easily if you go slowly.
>>
>>
>>
>> BAD ADVICE. A REAL MESSY PAIN IN THE ASS. AND IF IT LEAKS IN YOUR
>> PRINTER
>>
>> GREAT GOGAMOOGA LET ME OTTA HERE
>>
>>> Do not forget to
>>> leave a vent for each compartment. I leave the HP vented plugs in
>>> position and drill a hole
>>
>>
>> USE A CONDOM BEFORE YOU DRILL THE HOLE
>>
>>> into each compartment for filling. After
>>> filling I cover each of these holes with plastic tape.
>>>
>>> Filling the black cartridges is quite another story! Not really
>>> difficult once you ahve grasped the cunning pressure control system.
>>> For sealing the black cartridges I recommend gripping the sides of
>>> the case with a clamp to reduce the volume of the reservoir then
>>> sealing the filling hole with a small piece of plastic tape covered
>>> over and sealed round the edges with epoxy resin. When the resin
>>> has hardened, remove the clamp and a slight vacuum is produced
>>> internally. It works.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> BOY THE PAIN IN THE ASS AND MESS IS GROWING
>>
>>> Peter
>>> On 28 Jul 2005 02:17:16 -0700, "OM" <om.newsgroup@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> HP: OK... more expensive.
>>>> But from my experience, I'd argue that they still have the best
>>>> printers.
>>>> Fast printing, good quality and also importantly for me: quiter than
>>>> most other makes.
>>>> But... my only gripe with HP is that for most of the lower spec
>>>> models,
>>>> you only have two ink cartridges.
>>>> So... if the red goes completely... time to change regardless of the
>>>> other colours.
>>>> If I use compatible inks... how does it compare with other printers in
>>>> terms of costs??
>>>>
>>>> Any feedback would be appreciated.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> OM
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> We all see that you're wacko again you pathetic loser.
> Get lost.
> We don't need your kind.
> Frank


We all see that you're wacko again you pathetic loser.
Get lost.
We don't need your kind.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:50:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The 97 ink cart contains 14 ml of ink for the whole cart and not each
color, and the 100 grey cart is notorious for driking ink at a rapid
rate, hence why even with ink purges, Epson and Canon are far more
cost-effective than HP.
July 29, 2005 7:12:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122606088.881672.245640@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>> Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was
>> it
>> OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
>> tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it?
>
> 19th century was the rebirth of the bronze nub and the invention steel
> nub... both of which were a tad better than quills esp the steel nub
> which was more flexable. Probally the most common forumlation was lamp
> black and kerosene, but just solvent including water would do well..
> .it just so happened to be the by product of kerosene lamps so might as
> well save your self a trip and use kerosene with the waste to make ink.
> It wasn't until 1867 that the first patent for a fountain pen was
> granted in america... one of the major stumbling blocks was unlike quil
> or nub pens corosive ink would cause most things to decay and the pen
> wouldn't work anymore. This is where OEM ink was born. Later on in
> that century we had the stylographic pens.... while not so good for
> calligraphy were perfect for technical writing. these were basicly
> hollow pens with a port near the base that you could use an eye dropper
> and a hollow tube at the end about .5mm in diamater.. small enough so
> the 10 to 15 drops of ink would be held in place by surface tention but
> large enough that ink would flow out of the pen when you wrote. These
> worked ok with lamp black based inks so long as you used a sewing
> needle to clean them out from time to time. The really nice self
> filling pens were mass produced early 20th century known as the
> crescent filling... as well as the very popular cartridge filled pens
> by Sheaffer. This was the apex of the OEM ink market... while you
> could refil those Sheaffer cartidges, it was a pain in the tookus.
> Later on in the last part of the first quarter of the 20th century came
> the Pelikan piston filling pens which were far easier than the crescent
> fillers but these were for odd ball tinkerers that didn't want to pay
> extra for ink cartidges. As an added bonus Pelikan actually worked
> well with pigmented ink.and got a few patents on their exclusive ink
> forumlation. You could save a few bucks going with an international
> cartidge by the likes of Bexley or Tombrow, but you the consumer ran
> the risk of clogging your pen esp if you used pigmented inks in a pen
> that simply wasn't designed for it. It was rumored that all the ink
> came pretty much from the same place, but there was always someone who
> felt that buying Sheaffer ink for a Sheaffer pen was the best and only
> solution.
>
> So remember kids... when using your fountain pen remember when you
> charge cartidges always purge the old ink first by removing the nib and
> plaing it under lukewarm water and whip dry. Keep your nibs free from
> dust and dirt. Remember the nib structure and ink delivery system are
> complex and require the use of OEM to prevent clogging. This assures
> long live and instant readiness. Avoid jarring or shaking your pen and
> be sure that the cap is on right when it is not in use. The best way
> to carry your pen is nib pointing upwards.

And for sure, you don't want to have one of those early fountain pens in
your shirt pocket when you take a flight somewhere.
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 7:33:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <AoeGe.2043$kk6.620@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com>,
inkystinky@oem.com (measekite the troll) wrote:

> BAD ADVICE. A REAL MESSY PAIN IN THE ASS.

As you've never refilled a cartridge, or so you keep telling us, how would
you know?

Jon.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 7:33:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Jon O'Brien wrote:

>In article <AoeGe.2043$kk6.620@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com>,
>inkystinky@oem.com (measekite the troll) wrote:
>
>
>
>>BAD ADVICE. A REAL MESSY PAIN IN THE ASS.
>>
>>
>
>As you've never refilled a cartridge, or so you keep telling us, how would
>you know?
>
>Jon.
>
>

I AM A CLARA VOY ANT
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 7:59:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

>"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:1122606088.881672.245640@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>>>Now about those 19th century post offices that sold ink for mailing. Was
>>>it
>>>OEM ink or some unbranded aftermarket third party ink where they wouldn't
>>>tell the mailer the formulation of the ink or who made it?
>>>
>>>
>>19th century was the rebirth of the bronze nub and the invention steel
>>nub... both of which were a tad better than quills esp the steel nub
>>which was more flexable. Probally the most common forumlation was lamp
>>black and kerosene, but just solvent including water would do well..
>>.it just so happened to be the by product of kerosene lamps so might as
>>well save your self a trip and use kerosene with the waste to make ink.
>>It wasn't until 1867 that the first patent for a fountain pen was
>>granted in america...
>>

HE HAD THE FIRST ONE

>>one of the major stumbling blocks was unlike quil
>>or nub pens corosive ink would cause most things to decay and the pen
>>wouldn't work anymore. This is where OEM ink was born. Later on in
>>that century we had the stylographic pens.... while not so good for
>>calligraphy were perfect for technical writing. these were basicly
>>hollow pens with a port near the base that you could use an eye dropper
>>and a hollow tube at the end about .5mm in diamater.. small enough so
>>the 10 to 15 drops of ink would be held in place by surface tention but
>>large enough that ink would flow out of the pen when you wrote. These
>>worked ok with lamp black based inks so long as you used a sewing
>>needle to clean them out from time to time. The really nice self
>>filling pens were mass produced early 20th century known as the
>>crescent filling... as well as the very popular cartridge filled pens
>>by Sheaffer. This was the apex of the OEM ink market... while you
>>could refil those Sheaffer cartidges, it was a pain in the tookus.
>>Later on in the last part of the first quarter of the 20th century came
>>the Pelikan piston filling pens which were far easier than the crescent
>>fillers but these were for odd ball tinkerers that didn't want to pay
>>extra for ink cartidges. As an added bonus Pelikan actually worked
>>well with pigmented ink.and got a few patents on their exclusive ink
>>forumlation. You could save a few bucks going with an international
>>cartidge by the likes of Bexley or Tombrow, but you the consumer ran
>>the risk of clogging your pen esp if you used pigmented inks in a pen
>>that simply wasn't designed for it. It was rumored that all the ink
>>came pretty much from the same place, but there was always someone who
>>felt that buying Sheaffer ink for a Sheaffer pen was the best and only
>>solution.
>>
>>So remember kids... when using your fountain pen remember when you
>>charge cartidges always purge the old ink first by removing the nib and
>>plaing it under lukewarm water and whip dry. Keep your nibs free from
>>dust and dirt. Remember the nib structure and ink delivery system are
>>complex and require the use of OEM to prevent clogging. This assures
>>long live and instant readiness. Avoid jarring or shaking your pen and
>>be sure that the cap is on right when it is not in use. The best way
>>to carry your pen is nib pointing upwards.
>>
>>
>
>And for sure, you don't want to have one of those early fountain pens in
>your shirt pocket when you take a flight somewhere.
>
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 10:50:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Fred McKenzie wrote:

> In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
> <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>
>> I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>> buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>> absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>> little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>> In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>> I'm sorry I bought it.
>
> John-
>
> You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
> replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
> fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
> damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
> survived!
>
> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
> mailbox.
>
> By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
> dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.

Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
the Epson cart.

I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).

John
July 29, 2005 10:50:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"John Henderson" <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:3ksuphF109ocjU1@individual.net...
> Fred McKenzie wrote:
>
>> In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
>> <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>>
>>> I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>>> buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>>> absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>>> little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>>> In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>>> I'm sorry I bought it.
>>
>> John-
>>
>> You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
>> replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
>> fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
>> damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
>> survived!
>>
>> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
>> mailbox.
>>
>> By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
>> dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.
>
> Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
> remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
> the Epson cart.
>
> I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
> point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
> too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
> they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
> inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).
>
> John

John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for formulating In-Jah
ink???
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 10:50:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

>"John Henderson" <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote in message
>news:3ksuphF109ocjU1@individual.net...
>
>
>>Fred McKenzie wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
>>><jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>>>>buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>>>>absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>>>>little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>>>>In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>>>>I'm sorry I bought it.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>John-
>>>
>>>You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
>>>replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
>>>fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
>>>damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
>>>survived!
>>>
>>>Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
>>>mailbox.
>>>
>>>By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
>>>dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.
>>>
>>>
>>Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
>>remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
>>the Epson cart.
>>
>>I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
>>point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
>>too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
>>they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
>>inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).
>>
>>John
>>
>>
>
>John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for formulating In-Jah
>ink???
>
>

WHY DON'T YOU GOTO INJAH

>
>
>
July 29, 2005 10:50:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> Burt wrote:
>
>> "John Henderson" <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote in message
>> news:3ksuphF109ocjU1@individual.net...
>>
>>
>>> Fred McKenzie wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
>>>> <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>>>>> buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>>>>> absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>>>>> little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>>>>> In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>>>>> I'm sorry I bought it.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> John-
>>>>
>>>> You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
>>>> replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
>>>> fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
>>>> damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
>>>> survived!
>>>>
>>>> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
>>>> mailbox.
>>>>
>>>> By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
>>>> dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
>>> remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
>>> the Epson cart.
>>>
>>> I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
>>> point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
>>> too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
>>> they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
>>> inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).
>>>
>>> John
>>>
>>
>>
>> John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for formulating
>> In-Jah ink???
>>
>
> WHY DON'T YOU GOTO INJAH
>
>>
>>
>>
Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine.
Frank
July 29, 2005 10:50:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"measekite" <inkystinky@oem.com> wrote in message
news:SkeGe.2039$kk6.1750@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>
>
> Burt wrote:
>
>>"John Henderson" <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote in message
>>news:3ksuphF109ocjU1@individual.net...
>>
>>>Fred McKenzie wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
>>>><jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>>>>>buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>>>>>absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>>>>>little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>>>>>In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>>>>>I'm sorry I bought it.
>>>>>
>>>>John-
>>>>
>>>>You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
>>>>replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
>>>>fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
>>>>damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
>>>>survived!
>>>>
>>>>Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
>>>>mailbox.
>>>>
>>>>By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
>>>>dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.
>>>>
>>>Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
>>>remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
>>>the Epson cart.
>>>
>>>I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
>>>point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
>>>too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
>>>they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
>>>inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).
>>>
>>>John
>>>
>>
>>John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for formulating In-Jah
>>ink???
>
> WHY DON'T YOU GOTO INJAH

Been there, done that. Probably before you were born (or hatched???).
>
>>
>>
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 10:50:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Burt wrote:
>>
>>> "John Henderson" <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote in message
>>> news:3ksuphF109ocjU1@individual.net...
>>>
>>>
>>>> Fred McKenzie wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> In article <3ksaflFumq92U1@individual.net>, John Henderson
>>>>> <jhenRemoveThis@talk21.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> I read about Epson's new waterproof inks, but found out after
>>>>>> buying the RX630 that it uses dye-based ink. This makes it
>>>>>> absolutely useless for printing envelopes in my opinion. A
>>>>>> little water, and the printing is _absolutely_ unreadable.
>>>>>> In this respect, it's the worst printer I've ever used and
>>>>>> I'm sorry I bought it.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> John-
>>>>>
>>>>> You may be too young to remember when the ball-point pen
>>>>> replaced the older fountain pen in common useage. With the
>>>>> fountain pen, there was every bit as much a problem of water
>>>>> damage as with any inkjet printer today, yet the mail system
>>>>> survived!
>>>>>
>>>>> Mail is not normally exposed to water unless you have a leaky
>>>>> mailbox.
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, have you tested samples from the RX630? Some
>>>>> dye-based inks are better than others when exposed to water.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Yes, the Calidad black cart I'm trying at the moment at least
>>>> remains readable after I've dampened it, unlike the ink from
>>>> the Epson cart.
>>>>
>>>> I do remember the introduction of ball-point pens, and your
>>>> point about different formulations applies to fountain pen ink
>>>> too. IIRC, some carbon-black inks were pretty good, even if
>>>> they had a tendency to clog the nib (must have been aftermarket
>>>> inks, as Ron says in his delightful post).
>>>>
>>>> John
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for formulating
>>> In-Jah ink???
>>
>>
>> WHY DON'T YOU GOTO INJAH
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
> Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine.
> Frank

Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine. You mean inbetween your
mothers legs
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 12:22:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

> John - where might one buy aftermarket Lamp Black for
> formulating In-Jah ink???

21st century now - let's go straight to bucky-ball ink :) 

John
July 29, 2005 3:03:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Got any other stereotyped views you want to air?

Sure... Washington :D 
July 29, 2005 3:20:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> The 97 ink cart contains 14 ml of ink for the whole cart and not each
> color, and the 100 grey cart is notorious for driking ink at a rapid
> rate, hence why even with ink purges, Epson and Canon are far more
> cost-effective than HP.

Really are you sure? I don't have any infomration to back up my
statement other than the fact it's listed as having a yield of 450p...
which would sugest a volume of higher than 4.6ml each color. I'm all
for being corrected on this issue... but the numbers sugest a larger
valume.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:28:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <1122602969.847565.156890@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
zakezuke_us@yahoo.com (zakezuke) wrote:

> > Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine.

> England?

Got any other stereotyped views you want to air?

[Climbs into Handsome Cab and drives off through the fog to meet Sherlock
Homes, calling out "Oh, awfully top hole, old bean! Rather!" to a passing
Bow Street runner arresting a gin-sodden Artful Dodger]

Jon.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 6:53:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

tyranix95@hotmail.com wrote:

>The 97 ink cart contains 14 ml of ink for the whole cart and not each
>color, and the 100 grey cart is notorious for driking ink at a rapid
>rate, hence why even with ink purges, Epson and Canon are far more
>cost-effective than HP.
>
>

CANON IS MORE COST EFFECTIVE THEN ALL OF THE OTHER INKJETS.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 7:14:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Jon O'Brien <Jon@noonlyspambrowsingthanx.com> wrote:
> In article <1122602969.847565.156890@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
> zakezuke_us@yahoo.com (zakezuke) wrote:
>
> > > Why don't you go to where the sun don't shine.
>
> > England?
>
> Got any other stereotyped views you want to air?
>
> [Climbs into Handsome Cab and drives off through the fog to meet Sherlock

It's a Hansom cab (I hope that's the right spelling!), named after the
chap who invented/introduced them I believe.

> Homes, calling out "Oh, awfully top hole, old bean! Rather!" to a passing
> Bow Street runner arresting a gin-sodden Artful Dodger]
>
.... and it's Holmes, though I suspect that's just a typo. :-)

I don't really think Holmes would say anything quite like that either.

--
Chris Green
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 9:13:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <3kuvdoF10a1k8U1@individual.net>, usenet@isbd.co.uk () wrote:

> It's a Hansom cab (I hope that's the right spelling!)...

It is. However, since they haven't been in use in the UK for over a
hundred years, I'd forgotten. :-)

> ... and it's Holmes, though I suspect that's just a typo. :-)

It was (ash in keyboard means many keys don't always work first time!).

> I don't really think Holmes would say anything quite like that either.

Neither would any English person, even in the days when each element might
have been used by one person. In case you hadn't realised it, I'm English
and that was supposed be a /reductio ad absurdum/ conglomeration of the
stereotypical images of England held by the kind of people who think that
it's always raining in England and that the sun never shines here.

And that was supposed to have been me saying it, while on my way to see
SH.

Toodle-pip!

Jon.
July 29, 2005 9:45:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:
> HP PRINTERS ARE GENERALLY VERY GOOD. STAY AWAY FROM THE MODELS THAT
> HAVE 3 CARTS WITH ONLY 2 CART SLOTS. YOU WILL BE PLAYING MUSICAL CARTS.
>
> I ALSO HAVE A CANON IP4000. IT IS BETTER ON PHOTOS AND ALMOST AS GOOD
> ON BUSINESS DOCUMENTS BUT MUCH FASTER ON BOTH AND MUCH CHEAPER TO RUN.
> IT ALSO HAS TWIN PAPER FEEDS AND BOTH PROVIDE ME WITH DUPLEX PRINTING.
>




HELLO ANYBODY THERE?
July 29, 2005 9:45:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I'm here but a bit deafened by all the shouting. An HP like my 5550 that is
a 3 into 2 job still starts up and sorts it out quicker after a swap than an
Epson does at switch on, so it's not a real big hassle just a minor one.
Anyway, it's still possible to print some text out with the photo cartridges
in, it just won't be as dark.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 9:45:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Those models are a pain in the ass. The only HP that I think is good is
the one that takes 3 working carts.

SteveB wrote:

>I'm here but a bit deafened by all the shouting. An HP like my 5550 that is
>a 3 into 2 job still starts up and sorts it out quicker after a swap than an
>Epson does at switch on, so it's not a real big hassle just a minor one.
>Anyway, it's still possible to print some text out with the photo cartridges
>in, it just won't be as dark.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 9:45:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <ksrGe.2392$kk6.1185@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com>,
inkystinky@oem.com (measekite) wrote:

> Those models are a pain in the ass. The only HP that I think is good
> is the one that takes 3 working carts.

Hey, measekite! Someone with an IQ in double figures has hacked your
account!

Jon.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 29, 2005 9:45:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Jon O'Brien wrote:

>In article <ksrGe.2392$kk6.1185@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com>,
>inkystinky@oem.com (measekite) wrote:
>
>
>
>>Those models are a pain in the ass. The only HP that I think is good
>>is the one that takes 3 working carts.
>>
>>
>
>Hey, measekite! Someone with an IQ in double figures has hacked your
>account!
>
>Jon.
>
>

YOU ARE SO STUPID
July 29, 2005 10:25:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> HP 97 Tri-color Inkjet Print Cartridge with Vivera Inks
> Specifications:
> Ink volume: 14 ml

I'm aware it's 14... but is it 14ml*3 or 14ml/3. The reason I think
it's 14*3 is because they estimate the yield as being 450p... which
sounds high for only 4.6ml of CM and Y ink.

Actually 14ml sounds small for 450pages but possible.

Given the fact that the old #45 cart could hold 42ml of ink, I could
see how even with seperated chambers they could fit three 14ml chambers
in the cart.
July 30, 2005 2:57:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Peter" <please.reply@news.group> wrote in message
news:leble1lr0apjl6qmatcpqvou99ttm5nrn8@4ax.com...
> On 29 Jul 2005 00:57:57 -0700, "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com>

(snip)
>
> Thank you ZakeZuke!
>
> It is good to see someone getting the thread back on course. It is
> a pain in the neck the way that some people contribute little except
> an insight into their ignorance.
>
> Incidentally I have refilled cartridges for over five years with
> never a leak into a printer. Nevertheless, newspaper on the table,
> tissues at hand and a pair of rubber gloves are sensible precautions
> when doing the filling - Even when relatively skilled and rarely
> spilling a drop of ink!
>
> Peter

Interesting to me that there are so many people popping up on the NG who
have been refilling or using aftermarket inks/carts successfully for many
years. Pretty much shoots down the resident troll's constant upper-case
diatribe against aftermarket products and refilling carts. I've just
killfiled him for good as I'm tired of seeing his insulting, childish,
uninformed responses.
Anonymous
a b α HP
July 30, 2005 3:33:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

>"Peter" <please.reply@news.group> wrote in message
>news:leble1lr0apjl6qmatcpqvou99ttm5nrn8@4ax.com...
>
>
>>On 29 Jul 2005 00:57:57 -0700, "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com>
>>
>>
>
>(snip)
>
>
>>Thank you ZakeZuke!
>>
>>It is good to see someone getting the thread back on course. It is
>>a pain in the neck the way that some people contribute little except
>>an insight into their ignorance.
>>
>>Incidentally I have refilled cartridges for over five years with
>>never a leak into a printer. Nevertheless, newspaper on the table,
>>tissues at hand and a pair of rubber gloves are sensible precautions
>>when doing the filling - Even when relatively skilled and rarely
>>spilling a drop of ink!
>>
>>Peter
>>
>>
>
>Interesting to me that there are so many people popping up on the NG who
>have been refilling or using aftermarket inks/carts successfully for many
>years. Pretty much shoots down the resident troll's constant upper-case
>diatribe against aftermarket products and refilling carts. I've just
>killfiled him for good as I'm tired of seeing his insulting, childish,
>uninformed responses.
>
>

THIS MAN JUST TOLD LIES

>
>
>
!