I have Netgear WLAN Router, how can I can howmany laptops ..

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
Router?. How I will know?.

Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 1-54MBps / 14 channels)". What is
the Channels meaning here?. is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
connected simultaneously?.

Thanks in advance.
9 answers Last reply
More about netgear wlan router howmany laptops
  1. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    In article <1103077741.951461.106160@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    :Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 1-54MBps / 14 channels)". What is
    :the Channels meaning here?. is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    :connected simultaneously?.

    No, there are 14 frequency bands allocated, with different subsets
    of those being legal to use in different parts of the world. My
    probably incorrect recollection is that channel 14 is
    only authorized in France (which doesn't allow some of the
    lower-numbered bands.)

    When the radio is transmitting on a particular "channel", then
    the peak energy is going to frequencies near the official channel.
    However, with 802.11b there is also significant energy transmitted
    in the two frequency ranges on other side of the centre. This causes
    some degree of interference with transmissions on those other channels --
    for example, if there is a nearby device transmitting on channel 8
    then the energy it transmits in the range allocated to the centre
    of channel 6 might turn out to overwhelm the energy from a more
    distant device which is transmitting its peak energy in channel 6.

    Because of this overlap and potential for interference, you will
    often hear the guideline that that if you have multiple devices
    in an area, you should set them to be 5 channels apart, such as
    using channels 1, 6, and 11. That should be understood as a guideline
    and not a hard rule, though: it depends on your antennae and the
    signal strength from the overlapping chanels -- and there is a lot
    of redundancy in the transmitted data. Someone did an analysis of
    the energy patterns and determined that in all but the worst cases
    (device very close to each other), you could safely use channels
    that are only 3 apart, thus getting 4 effectively non-overlapping
    channels in the range of 11 that are permitted in USA/Canada.

    802.11g works on similar principles, but is defined in such a way
    as to effectively "hard-code" the 1/6/11 guideline -- you only
    have a choice of 3 channels for 802.11g.

    802.11a does NOT work on the same principles, and all of its channels
    can be used without interference.


    :I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    :can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    :Router?. How I will know?.

    It depends on -which- Netgear device you have. The reference to 54
    megabits per second and to channel 14 lead me to suspect you have one
    of the 802.11g routers such as Netgear's WGR614. It is often quite
    difficult to find information about how many devices an AP/router
    supports. What you are looking for is the "size of the MAC table" or
    "number of entries in the ARP table".

    I happen to have researched this figure a couple of weeks ago for the
    Linksys WAP54G. Linksys apparently told someone the limit was 5000. One
    highly respected wireless expert over in alt.internet.wireless (the
    place I suggest you post nearly all your wireless questions to) tested
    the Linksys WAP54G and found it can handle 253 clients.

    I'm going to hazard a guess that your Netgear might be the
    WGR614v4. If so, then if you look in the reference manual in the
    Key Features of the Router section, you will find:

    Parents and network administrators can establish restricted access
    policies based on time-of-day, web site addresses and address
    keywords, and share high-speed cable/DSL Internet access for up to
    253 personal computers.

    253 is the same number given in the v1 and v5 reference manual;
    I'm not going to bother looking at the v2 and v3 reference manual
    for completeness ;-)
    --
    IMT made the sky
    Fall.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Walter Roberson" <roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote in message
    news:cpoie5$gq3$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca...
    > In article <1103077741.951461.106160@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    > <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > :Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 1-54MBps / 14 channels)". What is
    > :the Channels meaning here?. is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    > :connected simultaneously?.
    >
    > No, there are 14 frequency bands allocated, with different subsets
    > of those being legal to use in different parts of the world. My
    > probably incorrect recollection is that channel 14 is
    > only authorized in France (which doesn't allow some of the
    > lower-numbered bands.)
    >
    > When the radio is transmitting on a particular "channel", then
    > the peak energy is going to frequencies near the official channel.
    > However, with 802.11b there is also significant energy transmitted
    > in the two frequency ranges on other side of the centre. This causes
    > some degree of interference with transmissions on those other channels --
    > for example, if there is a nearby device transmitting on channel 8
    > then the energy it transmits in the range allocated to the centre
    > of channel 6 might turn out to overwhelm the energy from a more
    > distant device which is transmitting its peak energy in channel 6.
    >
    > Because of this overlap and potential for interference, you will
    > often hear the guideline that that if you have multiple devices
    > in an area, you should set them to be 5 channels apart, such as
    > using channels 1, 6, and 11. That should be understood as a guideline
    > and not a hard rule, though: it depends on your antennae and the
    > signal strength from the overlapping chanels -- and there is a lot
    > of redundancy in the transmitted data. Someone did an analysis of
    > the energy patterns and determined that in all but the worst cases
    > (device very close to each other), you could safely use channels
    > that are only 3 apart, thus getting 4 effectively non-overlapping
    > channels in the range of 11 that are permitted in USA/Canada.
    >
    > 802.11g works on similar principles, but is defined in such a way
    > as to effectively "hard-code" the 1/6/11 guideline -- you only
    > have a choice of 3 channels for 802.11g.
    >
    > 802.11a does NOT work on the same principles, and all of its channels
    > can be used without interference.
    >
    >
    > :I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    > :can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    > :Router?. How I will know?.
    >
    > It depends on -which- Netgear device you have. The reference to 54
    > megabits per second and to channel 14 lead me to suspect you have one
    > of the 802.11g routers such as Netgear's WGR614. It is often quite
    > difficult to find information about how many devices an AP/router
    > supports. What you are looking for is the "size of the MAC table" or
    > "number of entries in the ARP table".
    >
    > I happen to have researched this figure a couple of weeks ago for the
    > Linksys WAP54G. Linksys apparently told someone the limit was 5000. One
    > highly respected wireless expert over in alt.internet.wireless (the
    > place I suggest you post nearly all your wireless questions to) tested
    > the Linksys WAP54G and found it can handle 253 clients.
    >
    > I'm going to hazard a guess that your Netgear might be the
    > WGR614v4. If so, then if you look in the reference manual in the
    > Key Features of the Router section, you will find:
    >
    > Parents and network administrators can establish restricted access
    > policies based on time-of-day, web site addresses and address
    > keywords, and share high-speed cable/DSL Internet access for up to
    > 253 personal computers.

    just be aware that there is likely to be a much lower limit on the number of
    simultaneous wireless devices (as opposed to devices connected via ethernet)

    alt.internet.wireless is a good place to ask, but i would be surprised if
    the Netgear can handle more than 15 or so wireless devices.
    >
    > 253 is the same number given in the v1 and v5 reference manual;
    > I'm not going to bother looking at the v2 and v3 reference manual
    > for completeness ;-)
    > --
    > IMT made the sky
    > Fall.
    --
    Regards

    Stephen Hope - return address needs fewer xxs
  3. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Begin <cpoie5$gq3$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>
    On 2004-12-15, Walter Roberson <roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote:
    > In article <1103077741.951461.106160@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    > <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >:Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 1-54MBps / 14 channels)". What is
    >:the Channels meaning here?. is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    >:connected simultaneously?.
    >
    > No, there are 14 frequency bands allocated, with different subsets
    > of those being legal to use in different parts of the world. My
    > probably incorrect recollection is that channel 14 is
    > only authorized in France (which doesn't allow some of the
    > lower-numbered bands.)
    [other good points snipped for brevity]

    Japan, actually. They started out with _just_ 14, but now they also (or
    instead?) allow 1..13. France also had some weirdness. It involved only
    allowing channels from say 10 to 13 or something like that. I can't seem
    to find it so I'm tempted to think they've conformed to the ETSI range
    of 1..13. Canada allows 1..11 like the usa and apparently the rest of
    the americas (give or take things like the mexican quirk that you can't
    use 1..8 outdoors).

    This is all about the 2.4GHz band for 802.11b (and, mostly, g), and that
    makes 11 channels available. The other three simply aren't legal to use.
    But wait! Add channels 36, 40, and 44 in the 5GHz band for 802.11a, for
    north america, presumably including canada, and you get 14 channels
    total. Isn't marketing great?

    I've taken this from appendix a of a cisco aironet ios config guide.
    A bit of googling suggests this is the working version but there may
    be some more quirks hidden in laws and regulations around the world.


    >:I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    >:can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    >:Router?. How I will know?.
    >
    > It depends on -which- Netgear device you have. The reference to 54
    > megabits per second and to channel 14 lead me to suspect you have one
    > of the 802.11g routers such as Netgear's WGR614.
    [snip!]

    I think the thing can do at least two out of three, at least one of
    which is `a', or maybe all three, since no other combination has a
    `14' popping up anywhere in north america.


    > 253 is the same number given in the v1 and v5 reference manual;
    > I'm not going to bother looking at the v2 and v3 reference manual
    > for completeness ;-)

    :-)


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
  4. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    jpd wrote:

    > France also had some weirdness.

    So, what else is new? ;-)

    > Canada allows 1..11 like the usa and apparently the rest of
    > the americas (give or take things like the mexican quirk that you can't
    > use 1..8 outdoors)

    People with amateur radio licences can use other channels as well as much
    more power.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    James Knott <james.knott@rogers.com> wrote:
    >People with amateur radio licences can use other channels as well as much
    >more power.

    Is that with standard WiFi gear, or do you have to do some ID thing?
    Would putting your call sign in the SSID field count?
  6. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    William P.N. Smith wrote:

    > James Knott <james.knott@rogers.com> wrote:
    >>People with amateur radio licences can use other channels as well as much
    >>more power.
    >
    > Is that with standard WiFi gear, or do you have to do some ID thing?
    > Would putting your call sign in the SSID field count?

    I haven't investigated the details, but your call sign has to be included
    somewhere. You might be able to use the higher channels, that can't
    otherwise be used. And of course modified or home built equipment is
    entirely legal and can run up to 1000 watts. Now, all I have to do, is
    modify my microwave oven, to send & receive data. ;-)
  7. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    I am looking for howmany maximum laptops over Wi-Fi can be supported?.
    How can I findout?. My Netgear Router had web interface. Is it based on
    MAC entries or ARP entries?. I wanted to know Is there any table can
    tell me the Max supported entries for that Router?.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    In article <1103257810.600147.116830@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >I am looking for howmany maximum laptops over Wi-Fi can be supported?.
    >How can I findout?. My Netgear Router had web interface. Is it based on
    >MAC entries or ARP entries?. I wanted to know Is there any table can
    >tell me the Max supported entries for that Router?.
    >


    What does netgear say ?

    --

    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    In article <1103257810.600147.116830@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    :I am looking for howmany maximum laptops over Wi-Fi can be supported?.
    :How can I findout?. My Netgear Router had web interface. Is it based on
    :MAC entries or ARP entries?.

    ARP is a protocol for discovering MAC addresses, so the two are
    synonymous for this purpose.

    :I wanted to know Is there any table can
    :tell me the Max supported entries for that Router?.

    I know of no publically available table with that information.

    Under reasonable assumptions about what -kind- of Netgear you had,
    I already pointed you to Netgear documentation that said 253 was
    the limit.

    But really we need you to define what it means to "support" a laptop.
    Do you mean "The maximum number that can be associated at the same
    time, with all of them doing nothing except keeping the device busy
    renewing the associations", or do you want to give some kind of
    performance metric -- .e.g, the maximum number that you can have all
    trying to transfer data at once with you still getting at least some
    specific number of kilobits per second of throughput when measured over
    (say) 1 minute.

    How many plates can you hold in your arms? Now how many plates
    can you hold in your arms and still do something useful with
    the plates? Different questions.
    --
    *We* are now the times. -- Wim Wenders (WoD)
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