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Is there a better option than the Configurable-HP ProLiant

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August 28, 2006 9:51:35 PM

Hello, all. I am a Sys Admin for an online community website and I am looking to purchase more storage servers and database servers. My CTO and I have come across the Proliant line. I am wondering, are we completely bonkers in beleiving that this is a monster server? What is HP's general reputation? It seems to me that all the reviews state that this is a Class A server. Here are my server details.

Configurable-HP ProLiant DL585 (PC3200) - Rack Server
HP ProLiant DL585 rack server
Two AMD® 885 Opteron™ 2.6GHz/1GHz, Dual Core PC3200 1MB Processors
Two AMD® 885 Opteron™ 2.6GHz/1GHz, Dual Core PC3200 1MB Processors
16GB REG PC3200 4/(2X2048)
Integrated Smart Array 5i Plus Controller with Battery Backed Write Cache
HP 300GB Pluggable Ultra320 SCSI 15,000 rpm (1") Universal Hard Drive
HP 300GB Pluggable Ultra320 SCSI 15,000 rpm (1") Universal Hard Drive
Dual Port HP NC7782 PCI-X Gbit (embedded)
Dual 870W hot pluggable power supply
1.44MB Floppy Disk Drive
CD-ROM drive 24X carbon
3 years parts, labor and onsite service (3/3/3) standard warranty. Certain restrictions and exclusions apply.

I would be very gratefull to anyone who would like to help. I will return the favor.

Moe
August 28, 2006 10:32:20 PM

I like the HP servers. They are great. Currently we use IBM, HP (Compaq), and Dell servers.

What is the budget? Also what is this server being used for? 16GB is bit much for a storage server but great for SQL. 2 300GB drives are great for a file server (but I would have done 3 drives and gone RAID5 for performance but I would split up the drives for a SQL box. Mirror 2 drives (OS and Log files) and a RAID for the DB itself.

The rest looks fine but I have only used the Intel based processors. All the servers we have are Xeons.

Hope that helps.
August 28, 2006 10:55:05 PM

Great input, thanks a lot! The server we are buying will be for fedora core 5
,function will be a dedicated postgresql database server and the other one will be a dedicated NFS server. Our budget is not that important at this stage. We need this technology solid, money is not a concern.

Moe
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August 28, 2006 11:23:57 PM

I used to work at a shop that used mostly HP Proliant servers. I had great luck with them myself. Never had problems with hotswap HDDs, hotswap PSU (never had one go out on me, but I tested hotswap), heat issues, etc. We even had an issue where our data center AC went out, we had to set up huge fans blowing air around our data center, etc. and the HP servers were all fine in the excessive heat.
August 29, 2006 12:07:09 AM

Quote:
Hello, all. I am a Sys Admin for an online community website and I am looking to purchase more storage servers and database servers. My CTO and I have come across the Proliant line. I am wondering, are we completely bonkers in beleiving that this is a monster server? What is HP's general reputation? It seems to me that all the reviews state that this is a Class A server. Here are my server details.

Configurable-HP ProLiant DL585 (PC3200) - Rack Server
HP ProLiant DL585 rack server
Two AMD® 885 Opteron™ 2.6GHz/1GHz, Dual Core PC3200 1MB Processors
Two AMD® 885 Opteron™ 2.6GHz/1GHz, Dual Core PC3200 1MB Processors
16GB REG PC3200 4/(2X2048)
Integrated Smart Array 5i Plus Controller with Battery Backed Write Cache
HP 300GB Pluggable Ultra320 SCSI 15,000 rpm (1") Universal Hard Drive
HP 300GB Pluggable Ultra320 SCSI 15,000 rpm (1") Universal Hard Drive
Dual Port HP NC7782 PCI-X Gbit (embedded)
Dual 870W hot pluggable power supply
1.44MB Floppy Disk Drive
CD-ROM drive 24X carbon
3 years parts, labor and onsite service (3/3/3) standard warranty. Certain restrictions and exclusions apply.

I would be very gratefull to anyone who would like to help. I will return the favor.

Moe



Well, yes this is a MONSTER Server. If you configure with 885 and the 64GB 2700RAM, you will be as fast as MS' servers. All of MS' internal servers - last I heard - were DL585 with Server 2003 X64.

I can honestly say that you can actually save some money on the same specs from monarchcomputer.com

The last time I checked they were $3-5000 less than HP. They are an AMD GoldPartner and MS Gold Partner so they're reliable.

Check them out first.
August 29, 2006 6:05:48 AM

Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.

Don't you think that you are going overboard with 16GB of RAM, a pair of 885's (!) and 15Krpm SCSI HDDs ?

Seriously, 2~4GB of RAM, a two socket mobo, a pair of 270's and a "modest" RAID-5 array made of 160GB WD RE SATA HDDs will cost a lot less and most likely perform just as good.
August 29, 2006 8:35:23 AM

Quote:
Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.


Then whose problem is it when it breaks? If you buy it from HP it's their problem and that's a good thing.
August 30, 2006 12:15:32 AM

Quote:
Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.


Then whose problem is it when it breaks? If you buy it from HP it's their problem and that's a good thing.
Exactly. What you are paying for with HP is the support and compatibility, not the components. If you build your own server and it breaks, you better hope somebody has the component you need in stock and can get it to you ASAP. With HP you don't need to worry about that, and I imagine the TCO is about the same as building your own server even though the upfront cost is greater.
August 30, 2006 1:37:19 AM

Quote:
Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.


Then whose problem is it when it breaks? If you buy it from HP it's their problem and that's a good thing.
Exactly. What you are paying for with HP is the support and compatibility, not the components. If you build your own server and it breaks, you better hope somebody has the component you need in stock and can get it to you ASAP. With HP you don't need to worry about that, and I imagine the TCO is about the same as building your own server even though the upfront cost is greater.

Exactly. Less chance of a cluster****.
August 30, 2006 4:01:21 AM

Quote:
Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.


Then whose problem is it when it breaks? If you buy it from HP it's their problem and that's a good thing.

Sure, we all know that hardware constantly breaks down... :roll:

HP staff don't have superhuman powers, they got the same kind of knowledge and skills as as any other IT or hardware enthusiast, same goes for the hardware they use, it wasn't imbued with some kind of magic that wards off problems, store bought components are just as good, reliable and available.

Given that one can build a server with a certain level of redundancy, a dead CPU, bad stick of RAM or faulty HDD won't cripple the system, just remove the culprit, it will obviously impact the performance until it is replaced or RMA'ed but the system will be functionnal in the meantime.
August 30, 2006 4:15:23 AM

Quote:
I am a Sys Admin for an online community website

Are you good at server (especailly hardware) problem solving?
Are you an enthusiast?

Good point, my stance on the matter pretty much implied that he was, my bad if he's not...
August 30, 2006 1:51:58 PM

Quote:
Rackmounts are somewhat touchy but an experienced hardware enthusiast can build his own server for a fraction of what HP will most likely charge you.


Then whose problem is it when it breaks? If you buy it from HP it's their problem and that's a good thing.

Sure, we all know that hardware constantly breaks down... :roll:

HP staff don't have superhuman powers, they got the same kind of knowledge and skills as as any other IT or hardware enthusiast, same goes for the hardware they use, it wasn't imbued with some kind of magic that wards off problems, store bought components are just as good, reliable and available.

Given that one can build a server with a certain level of redundancy, a dead CPU, bad stick of RAM or faulty HDD won't cripple the system, just remove the culprit, it will obviously impact the performance until it is replaced or RMA'ed but the system will be functionnal in the meantime.

Sorry I didn't meanto be condescending :) 

But I was just saying that with a homebuilt you're essentially on your own when there are problems. The problem comes down the track if a component you're using is phased out. For most people HP fit the bill nicely and provide good support.
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