Installing Windows 2000 Drive Letters

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Hello,


I am trying to install Windows 2000 Server, the hard disk is at the
moment blank and unused. This server is going to be a terminal
services server and because of this I need Windows installed on the M
drive, ie M:\Winnt. I do not want to have any other drives like C:.
Going through setup I can not assign the drive letter M and Windows
default is the C: drive. How is this done Please can anyone advise me?
Thanks in advance.


Timothy.
13 answers Last reply
More about installing windows 2000 drive letters
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    "Timothy" <tpateman@equity.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:42c306ab.0407210641.2d00cbe5@posting.google.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    >
    > I am trying to install Windows 2000 Server, the hard disk is at the
    > moment blank and unused. This server is going to be a terminal
    > services server and because of this I need Windows installed on the M
    > drive, ie M:\Winnt. I do not want to have any other drives like C:.
    > Going through setup I can not assign the drive letter M and Windows
    > default is the C: drive. How is this done Please can anyone advise me?
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    >
    > Timothy.

    The answer:

    How To Restore the System/Boot Drive Letter in Windows

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;223188

    And some useful supplemental info:

    How Windows 2000 Assigns, Reserves, and Stores Drive Letters

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;234048

    --

    Mike Brown
    Asset Forwarding Corp.
    EPA-compliant Electronics Recycling
    DoD 5220.22-M Data Elimination
    http://www.assetforwarding.com
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    It would be a hell of work.

    Create thirteen (?) partitions, the last one should be M:, and install OS.
    Delete twelve partitions, resize and convert M: partition to primary, fix
    MBR, boot record, loader and the boot.ini files. You can clone M: partition
    and save some time.
    Another approach is a registry editing. Advanced registry editors such as
    Norton one have Replace function, and you can quickly change all the
    incursions of C: on M: after the regular setup. You can do it manually
    indeed.

    Keep in mind you'll must change any installation path disk letter (C: by
    default) during applications setup on the Terminal Services server as such.

    Let's wait and see who'll ask "Why do you need that?" :o)
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Jetro wrote:
    > It would be a hell of work.
    >
    > Create thirteen (?) partitions, the last one should be M:, and
    > install OS. Delete twelve partitions, resize and convert M: partition
    > to primary, fix MBR, boot record, loader and the boot.ini files. You
    > can clone M: partition and save some time.
    > Another approach is a registry editing. Advanced registry editors
    > such as Norton one have Replace function, and you can quickly change
    > all the incursions of C: on M: after the regular setup. You can do it
    > manually indeed.
    >
    > Keep in mind you'll must change any installation path disk letter (C:
    > by default) during applications setup on the Terminal Services server
    > as such.
    >
    > Let's wait and see who'll ask "Why do you need that?" :o)

    OK - I'll bite. "Why do you need that?"
    (I was gonna ask anyway) :-D
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Yea, initially I was gonna just ask too 8-B
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Oh, BTW: I hope Timothy won't install Exchange on this box because the
    letter M(ail) is occupied.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Apparently this article should be re-written in more plain and layman
    language.

    It was quite surprised reading it at a glance - it's seemed too good to be
    true and contradicted all the experience - until I found the warning (sorry,
    I follow all the Murphy's laws :) which clearly states "Do not use the
    procedure that is described in this article to change a drive on a computer
    where the drive letter has not changed. If you do so, you may not be able to
    start your operating system. Follow the procedure that is described in this
    article only to recover from a drive letter change, not to change an
    existing computer drive to something else." This warning must be printed in
    bold and largest point!

    I change the C: letter on XP box as described and after restart and logon
    attempt the nice warning popped up: "A problem is preventing Windows from
    accurately checking the license for this computer. ERROR 0x80090006."
    All-hackers mentor Jerold Schulman explains: "This problem is the result of
    the hardware ID on the restored installation being different from the
    hardware hash calculated for the current hardware. To resolve this problem,
    perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP and reactivate the Windows XP
    license." Thank you very much, I was thinking, but I don't want no silly
    in-place upgrades and quickly returned the letter C: (maybe I deleted the
    value completely). As expected, the system's been shaken but didn't raise a
    brow and came to life.

    Next victim was W2k installation just for redundancy. It wasn't interesting
    already: after the first reboot I got infamous warning "No paging file" so
    it involved registry editing at HKLM\SYSTEM\CCS\Control\Session
    Manager\Memory Management, REG_MULTI_SIZE "PagingFiles", and after that
    logon got in the dead loop without any warning as predicted. I gave up.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    The article title used to be "How To Change the System/Boot Drive Letter in
    Windows" I at least got them to change that.

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect

    "Jetro" wrote:
    | Apparently this article should be re-written in more plain and layman
    | language.
    |
    | It was quite surprised reading it at a glance - it's seemed too good to
    be
    | true and contradicted all the experience - until I found the warning
    (sorry,
    | I follow all the Murphy's laws :) which clearly states "Do not use the
    | procedure that is described in this article to change a drive on a
    computer
    | where the drive letter has not changed. If you do so, you may not be able
    to
    | start your operating system. Follow the procedure that is described in
    this
    | article only to recover from a drive letter change, not to change an
    | existing computer drive to something else." This warning must be printed
    in
    | bold and largest point!
    |
    | I change the C: letter on XP box as described and after restart and logon
    | attempt the nice warning popped up: "A problem is preventing Windows from
    | accurately checking the license for this computer. ERROR 0x80090006."
    | All-hackers mentor Jerold Schulman explains: "This problem is the result
    of
    | the hardware ID on the restored installation being different from the
    | hardware hash calculated for the current hardware. To resolve this
    problem,
    | perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP and reactivate the Windows XP
    | license." Thank you very much, I was thinking, but I don't want no silly
    | in-place upgrades and quickly returned the letter C: (maybe I deleted the
    | value completely). As expected, the system's been shaken but didn't raise
    a
    | brow and came to life.
    |
    | Next victim was W2k installation just for redundancy. It wasn't
    interesting
    | already: after the first reboot I got infamous warning "No paging file" so
    | it involved registry editing at HKLM\SYSTEM\CCS\Control\Session
    | Manager\Memory Management, REG_MULTI_SIZE "PagingFiles", and after that
    | logon got in the dead loop without any warning as predicted. I gave up.
    |
    |
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Hey,

    Will I need / would like to do this because we did have Citrix
    installed before moving to windows terminal services and when using
    citrix it installs it all on the M drive and there is no C drive at
    all. When we moved users over on the same box to terminal services all
    there programs and everything is setup to access apps from the M drive
    which is why I wanted to keep to this setting. Does anyone know if
    this is still the standard thing to do setting up terminal services
    servers as M drive or is it just C drive now? Thanks for your help so
    far. Timothy.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Please read Citrix docs

    http://knowledgebase.citrix.com/kb/entry.jspa?entryID=1985
    Server Drive Remapping and using the Driveremap.exe Utility in MetaFrame XP
    FR2

    http://knowledgebase.citrix.com/kb/entry.jspa?entryID=1983
    MetaFrame 1.8 and MetaFrame XP Drive Remapping Best Practice
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    you can get around that issue by changing the path in the registry to this
    key
    Change from:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
    Version\Winlogon\Userinit:Reg_SZ:C:\WINNT\system32\userinit.exe
    Change to:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
    Version\Winlogon\Userinit:Reg_SZ:userinit.exe
    there is more information in this article
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;249321&sd=tech

    This is common after gohsting a drive or upgrading from a smaller drive to
    another larger one. I would recomend making the change before switching
    drive letters so you don't need to mess around with network conections. also
    i think this article will shed some light on it too.
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;223188
    you should be able to piece the stuff together and get it working.

    An alternative to this hassle might be to just install the os on a small
    partition then do a rename the drive letter of the second partition to the
    one he wan'ts to use (m:\) then you should be able to do another install to
    that drive and because of the way 2000/xp asigns drive letters it should
    continue to se the drive as m:\ or whatever you use. you might need to
    modify the boot ini to bot to it. I'm not sure why he would need to have the
    boot drive letter as m: though. there should be another way around it like
    mounting the filesystem as another drive letter. I'm pretty sure windows
    2000/xp lets you do this. I know it can be done in linux but i forget the
    way to do it in windows. M aybe there is somethign with dynamic disks that
    would allow it? i dunno

    "Jetro" <ik9480@spam.rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:OfRml33bEHA.2840@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Apparently this article should be re-written in more plain and layman
    > language.
    >
    > It was quite surprised reading it at a glance - it's seemed too good to
    be
    > true and contradicted all the experience - until I found the warning
    (sorry,
    > I follow all the Murphy's laws :) which clearly states "Do not use the
    > procedure that is described in this article to change a drive on a
    computer
    > where the drive letter has not changed. If you do so, you may not be able
    to
    > start your operating system. Follow the procedure that is described in
    this
    > article only to recover from a drive letter change, not to change an
    > existing computer drive to something else." This warning must be printed
    in
    > bold and largest point!
    >
    > I change the C: letter on XP box as described and after restart and logon
    > attempt the nice warning popped up: "A problem is preventing Windows from
    > accurately checking the license for this computer. ERROR 0x80090006."
    > All-hackers mentor Jerold Schulman explains: "This problem is the result
    of
    > the hardware ID on the restored installation being different from the
    > hardware hash calculated for the current hardware. To resolve this
    problem,
    > perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP and reactivate the Windows XP
    > license." Thank you very much, I was thinking, but I don't want no silly
    > in-place upgrades and quickly returned the letter C: (maybe I deleted the
    > value completely). As expected, the system's been shaken but didn't raise
    a
    > brow and came to life.
    >
    > Next victim was W2k installation just for redundancy. It wasn't
    interesting
    > already: after the first reboot I got infamous warning "No paging file" so
    > it involved registry editing at HKLM\SYSTEM\CCS\Control\Session
    > Manager\Memory Management, REG_MULTI_SIZE "PagingFiles", and after that
    > logon got in the dead loop without any warning as predicted. I gave up.
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    My point is that the KB article 223188 might mislead and as I see, it does
    mislead.
    BTW, I've never been having any problem with cloned drives/partitions.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    i see your point and second it.

    the cloned drives and changing the drive letter are basically the same
    issue. I mentioned it because others would read your post and probably be in
    some sort of trouble when reading it. i figured it would be the best place
    for a reply when it comes up.

    it would be interesting to find if there are any other solutions to those
    problems.

    "Jetro" <ik9480@spam.rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:%23uwP5zFcEHA.2940@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > My point is that the KB article 223188 might mislead and as I see, it does
    > mislead.
    > BTW, I've never been having any problem with cloned drives/partitions.
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.hardware,microsoft.public.win2000.file_system,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    "jazz" <aprilo9@hotmail.com.nospam> wrote in message
    news:%23q4C4ZFcEHA.3580@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > An alternative to this hassle might be to just install the os on a small
    > partition then do a rename the drive letter of the second partition to the
    > one he wan'ts to use (m:\) then you should be able to do another install
    to
    > that drive and because of the way 2000/xp asigns drive letters it should
    > continue to se the drive as m:\ or whatever you use. you might need to
    > modify the boot ini to bot to it. I'm not sure why he would need to have
    the
    > boot drive letter as m: though. there should be another way around it like
    > mounting the filesystem as another drive letter. I'm pretty sure windows
    > 2000/xp lets you do this. I know it can be done in linux but i forget the
    > way to do it in windows. M aybe there is somethign with dynamic disks that
    > would allow it? i dunno

    The SUBST command could save the OP quite a bit of trouble here.

    >SUBST /?

    Associates a path with a drive letter.

    SUBST [drive1: [drive2:]path]
    SUBST drive1: /D

    drive1: Specifies a virtual drive to which you want to assign a
    path.
    [drive2:]path Specifies a physical drive and path you want to assign to
    a virtual drive.
    /D Deletes a substituted (virtual) drive.

    Type SUBST with no parameters to display a list of current virtual drives.


    So...

    SUBST M: C:\

    But I'm not sure how this would react to registry entries, etc. which point
    to C:

    --

    Mike Brown
    Asset Forwarding Corp.
    EPA-compliant Electronics Recycling
    DoD 5220.22-M Data Elimination
    http://www.assetforwarding.com
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