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Question: Applying artic silver 5?

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August 31, 2006 5:25:55 AM

This may sound like a really dumb question, but I just bought a Zalman CNPS9500 and some artic silver 5, what is the best way to apply it? I bought the OEM artic silver and it did not come with any application instructions. Also how much do I put on the heatsink? Thanks.
August 31, 2006 7:54:01 AM

its not stupid at all. its scary as all (-)#!! but its not , once you do it a couple a times.

the best way I have found is look at the heatsink base, kinda hover over the chip, and figure out the basic placement of the silver, on said heat sink.

then get some scoth tape and tape off that area. so the inside of the tape is the outside of the chip.

then you put a small amount in the middle, and with plastic card (any old gift card or bank card) and paper towel in hand, carefully move the silver vertically and horizontilly, using the tape as a depth guide. yes only that deep. But make it smooth as suri cruises ass.

pull the tape off, and you have perfect lines.


http://www.overclockers.com/tips692/
Related resources
August 31, 2006 8:58:16 AM

Why on earth would you do that?
August 31, 2006 9:22:05 AM

Quote:
This may sound like a really dumb question, but I just bought a Zalman CNPS9500 and some artic silver 5, what is the best way to apply it? I bought the OEM artic silver and it did not come with any application instructions. Also how much do I put on the heatsink? Thanks.


Use Google to goto the AS site.
August 31, 2006 9:28:21 AM

in my experience there are 2 viable methods:

1) as described on the arctic silver website

2) thin piece of plastic - put a little on top and spread it out with a thin piece of plastic, make *very* sure that the layer is equally spread and thin

I've not noticed temperature differences when using one of the above methods, simply tossing it on and placing your CPU will result in very poor cooling.
August 31, 2006 9:28:47 AM

Reading previous replies are for the noobs.
August 31, 2006 9:31:25 AM

Quote:
its not stupid at all. its scary as all (-)#!! but its not , once you do it a couple a times.

the best way I have found is look at the heatsink base, kinda hover over the chip, and figure out the basic placement of the silver, on said heat sink.

then get some scoth tape and tape off that area. so the inside of the tape is the outside of the chip.

then you put a small amount in the middle, and with plastic card (any old gift card or bank card) and paper towel in hand, carefully move the silver vertically and horizontilly, using the tape as a depth guide. yes only that deep. But make it smooth as suri cruises ass.

pull the tape off, and you have perfect lines.


http://www.overclockers.com/tips692/



That is possibly the dumbest thing I've ever read on these forums. And thats saying alot.
August 31, 2006 9:35:33 AM

Quote:
its not stupid at all. its scary as all (-)#!! but its not , once you do it a couple a times.

the best way I have found is look at the heatsink base, kinda hover over the chip, and figure out the basic placement of the silver, on said heat sink.

then get some scoth tape and tape off that area. so the inside of the tape is the outside of the chip.

then you put a small amount in the middle, and with plastic card (any old gift card or bank card) and paper towel in hand, carefully move the silver vertically and horizontilly, using the tape as a depth guide. yes only that deep. But make it smooth as suri cruises ass.

pull the tape off, and you have perfect lines.


http://www.overclockers.com/tips692/



That is possibly the dumbest thing I've ever read on these forums. And thats saying alot.

I agree with you.
It at really depends how good/flat the heatsink/cpu surface is, as we should all know thermal paste is used to transfer the heat to the heatsink where contact is not making. In some cases using too much will make matters worse.

There's a few ways of doing it, you must have heard of the 'rice sized' blob in the middle, but people fail to mention this is for 'concaved' heatsinks which are not flat.

I myself used clingfilm over my finger and spread a very veeery thin layer over most of it. Seems to get the best results right away for me.

Ofcourse it takes a long time to cure.
August 31, 2006 10:02:33 AM

Personally, I 'lap' the CPU and the heatsink with a 27 CM mill bastard file, then use a butter knife to evenly spread a goodly amount of AS5 over both surfaces. Mount the cpu, then the HSF, and you're away.

Or, to save time and money, just follow kidsmoke's advice.
August 31, 2006 10:52:32 AM

whats wrong with spreading it directly onto the CPU?
thats what i've been doing for the last 3 years... and i've not broken a CPU yet. i just spread it as thin as possible using a credit card or sommit like that without being able to see the original metal.
once thats done, it really doesnt matter since when u place the heatsink on it doesnt really leave any gap. the reason u want it really thin is so there is no leakage around the side of the CPU
August 31, 2006 11:23:32 AM

wOot I'm not an idiot! =P
August 31, 2006 12:02:45 PM

Quote:
the reason u want it really thin is so there is no leakage around the side of the CPU

No, that's wrong. The reason it should be really thin is that all you are trying to do is fill in the microscopic valleys/bumps on the surface of the heatsink and heat spreader, not make an f'n 'smore! Excess thermal compound will actually begin to impede heat transfer.
August 31, 2006 12:11:31 PM

Quote:
then get some scoth tape and tape off that area. so the inside of the tape is the outside of the chip. pull the tape off, and you have perfect lines.

That's gotta be some of the worst advice I have ever heard. The scotch tape will leave glue on the surface of heatspreader which will impede heat flow. What he should do is clean the connection surfaces with 90% isopropyl alcohol using a lint free cloth (coffee filter, eyeglass cloth). Avoid touching the mating surfaces with your bare hands as skin oils, hair, skin cells, and finger prints left of the surfaces can impede heat flow. Insert the CPU into its socket and install brackets for the heatsink if there are any. Then apply a "uncooked rice grain"-sized dollop of AS5 dead center on the heatspreader. Keeping the heatsink level, slowly and gently lower it onto the CPU 1-2 degrees off of the proper orientation. When it is fully resting on the CPU, slowly and gently twist it to proper orientation. This ensures the heatsink properly spreads the AS5 and eliminates air bubbles (I think?). Don't lift up the heatsink to check coverage because reapplication runs the risk of air bubbles.

Or just follow the instructions on AS's website, since this is essentially what they recommend.

You don't need to cover the entire heat spreader. FAR MORE HEAT is transfered from the core directly to area of the heat spreader in direct contact. The outer edges do not require the same thermal coupling as DIRECTLY above the CPU core.
August 31, 2006 12:27:22 PM

I used tha dab method. Basically I use a lent free cloth and then apply the AS5 on it then just dab it to the cpu. It's very light coat and you can still see the surface and works really well too. You can use like credit card to spread the thermal paste very thinly over the surface.
August 31, 2006 12:48:24 PM

Look at your CPU, can you see the core? No? That's because it has a heat spreader already on it. The reason they rec. only putting a little dab on is because of that heat spreader. Follow that advice. I have no idea what half these people are saying, but DON'T LISTEN TO THEM. This could really jack your computer up. Just follow the advice on AS's website, they know what they're talking about. Grain of rice man, grain of rice. I usually put a tiny dot each on cpu and heat sink, then buff it completely off with a lint-free towel. Then I follow their advice. If you try to spread it out evenly, you'll put too much on, and your temps will go way up. WAY up. Don't do it.
August 31, 2006 1:03:22 PM

qwerty is correct. Go to THG resources .. videos.. and watch THG video 17 down about half way on the page.

THG videos

They remove and add processors to these motherboards several times. You'll see the techs place a dab of silver in the middle of the cpu and place the heatsink on with a slight twist. When they remove the HSF you'll see an even layer of paste.
August 31, 2006 1:05:20 PM

Quote:
Look at your CPU, can you see the core? No? That's because it has a heat spreader already on it. The reason they rec. only putting a little dab on is because of that heat spreader. Follow that advice. I have no idea what half these people are saying, but DON'T LISTEN TO THEM. This could really jack your computer up. Just follow the advice on AS's website, they know what they're talking about. Grain of rice man, grain of rice. I usually put a tiny dot each on cpu and heat sink, then buff it completely off with a lint-free towel. Then I follow their advice. If you try to spread it out evenly, you'll put too much on, and your temps will go way up. WAY up. Don't do it.

I'm not sure why you're replying to me with that when basically you said what I said but with less detail. I'm just going to ignore it and assume you're just too lazy to scroll up and reply to the OP. I gave good advice.
August 31, 2006 1:43:56 PM

Quote:
the reason u want it really thin is so there is no leakage around the side of the CPU

No, that's wrong. The reason it should be really thin is that all you are trying to do is fill in the microscopic valleys/bumps on the surface of the heatsink and heat spreader, not make an f'n 'smore! Excess thermal compound will actually begin to impede heat transfer.
Both are correct. If you've read arctic silver's site, you should have noticed this:

Quote:
Caution:
While much safer than silver greases engineered for high electrical conductivity, Arctic Silver thermal compound should be kept away from electrical traces, pins, and leads. The compound is slightly capacitive and could cause problems if it bridged two close-proximity electrical paths.


Considering some cpu's have resistors and electric gates on their surface, burn-e86's information IS correct.
August 31, 2006 1:50:45 PM

Whats all this 'spreading with a credit card" hub-bub...? I always just went by the AS website and put a single dab in the middle and put it on. Although I think I put too much on last time...So I think I'm gonna take off my heat sink and re-apply.
August 31, 2006 1:53:47 PM

it is somewhat what they do when people use cocaine hahahaha but instead of doing those lines they spread the thermal grease in order to create a very thin layer without any excess
August 31, 2006 2:22:34 PM

I put a pea-sized dab on top of the CPU, then spread it into a thin layer with a credit card.
August 31, 2006 2:29:22 PM

Quote:
its not stupid at all. its scary as all (-)#!! but its not , once you do it a couple a times.

the best way I have found is look at the heatsink base, kinda hover over the chip, and figure out the basic placement of the silver, on said heat sink.

then get some scoth tape and tape off that area. so the inside of the tape is the outside of the chip.

then you put a small amount in the middle, and with plastic card (any old gift card or bank card) and paper towel in hand, carefully move the silver vertically and horizontilly, using the tape as a depth guide. yes only that deep. But make it smooth as suri cruises ass.

pull the tape off, and you have perfect lines.


http://www.overclockers.com/tips692/



That is possibly the dumbest thing I've ever read on these forums. And thats saying alot.

If you want dumb, then read the thread that's linked in my signature. Almost 7 months of stupidity.
August 31, 2006 2:33:18 PM

Alright well since I have a heat shredder on my CPU (its an E6600), I am definately going to try the 1/2 rice dab method. Thanks alot for all of your input.
August 31, 2006 2:46:09 PM

jap0nes, burn-e86 implied that the reason for having a thin layer (as opposed to a thick layer) was to prevent the thermal compound from leaking out over the sides. That may be true in older style "open-die" CPUs, but since this is an enthusiast forum, we are assuming lampshadehead has a CPU that uses a heatspreader.

With application on a heatspreader the purpose of a thin layer is to provide optimal thermal coupling. The use of the rice-dollop-squish-and-twist method automatically prevents the thermal compound from leaking out the sides. This is the method advocated by ArcticSilver for newer style CPUs.

So now you see why I said he was wrong.

EDIT: I see now that lampshadehead is infact using a CPU that has a heatspreader. 8)
August 31, 2006 2:51:45 PM

Quote:
If you want dumb, then read the thread that's linked in my signature. Almost 7 months of stupidity.
I wonder.. if it keeps going because it's posted in your sig?! :lol: 

Oh wait I just read the first page. Comedic gold!
August 31, 2006 2:54:32 PM

like i said, both are correct, but if you like to have the last word, then only you are correct.

btw, many "enthusiasts" out there actually remove the heat spreader to expose the die and mount the hsf directly to the die, so burn-e86 is also correct in his proposition, but that's not the case of this thread.
August 31, 2006 3:02:35 PM

Quote:
like i said, both are correct, but if you like to have the last word, then only you are correct.

btw, many "enthusiasts" out there actually remove the heat spreader to expose the die and mount the hsf directly to the die, so burn-e86 is also correct in his proposition, but that's not the case of this thread.


No, I don't need to "have the last word." But you said:

Quote:
If you've read arctic silver's site, you should have noticed this

Which I can only assume was directed at me with a condescending tone. I do stick up for myself, sometimes :lol: 

Well you're right, some enthusiasts might try that. I thought we were talking within the scope of the AS website, which, by the way, doesn't recommend such a method :lol:  :lol: 
August 31, 2006 3:09:29 PM

One thing I’ve read on another thread that I thought was a good idea is to use a razor blade to spread the AS5 as that has an extremely flat/fine edged surface and is small enough to get inside the heat-sink mounting bracket.
Another personal note; after your done and up and running I find that running the CPU under max load for several (4+) hours then turning the computer off for the night allows the AS5 to fill in the micro pores and makes for noticeable (5c) temperature decease the next day.
August 31, 2006 3:16:54 PM

Quote:
I thought we were talking within the scope of the AS website

AS site says keep away from electrical stuff.

thin layer = away from electric stuff = better thermal conductivity

Quote:
Another personal note; after your done and up and running I find that running the CPU under max load for several (4+) hours then turning the computer off for the night allows the AS5 to fill in the micro pores and makes for noticeable (5c) temperature decease the next day.

that's exactly what they say on their site:

Quote:

Important Reminder:
Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired.
August 31, 2006 3:29:04 PM

Quote:
thin layer = away from electric stuff = better thermal conductivity

AS on your resistors will create a slight capacitance. How does preventing that even relate to AS's thermal conductivity? Let alone the fact that thermal conductivity has a static maximum value that can only lessen through improper application and the presence contaminants. You can't improve the thermal conductivity of a thermal compound.
August 31, 2006 3:31:04 PM

Quote:
Alright well since I have a heat shredder on my CPU (its an E6600), I am definately going to try the 1/2 rice dab method. Thanks alot for all of your input.


LMAO! Look at what I wrote, " heat shredder". OMG what the hell was I thinking when I wrote that
August 31, 2006 3:37:50 PM

Quote:
thin layer = away from electric stuff = better thermal conductivity

AS on your resistors will create a slight capacitance. How does preventing that even relate to AS's thermal conductivity? Let alone the fact that thermal conductivity has a static maximum value that can only lessen through improper application and the presence contaminants. You can't improve the thermal conductivity of a thermal compound.
if a=b and a=c, then b=c and a=b=c
August 31, 2006 3:48:05 PM

Quote:
thin layer = away from electric stuff = better thermal conductivity

if a=b and a=c, then b=c and a=b=c


A != B

That's been my point all along. Remember what we've been talking about?
August 31, 2006 3:52:01 PM

and my point is:

thin layer due to electrical issues = good

thin layer due to thermal issues = good

then both are good, in any case

what i'm trying to tell you is that you cant say the guy is wrong, because he is right. The only thing is that what he said does not apply to this context, as the OP's cpu does have a heat spreader. But he is not wrong at all.
August 31, 2006 3:55:21 PM

Quote:
what i'm trying to tell you is that you cant say the guy is wrong, because he is right. The only thing is that what he said does not apply to this context

Right. And I implied (but not directly stated) this in my first reply to you. So we've come full circle. Thread can resume normal conversation now.
August 31, 2006 3:56:35 PM

yeah :) 
the circle is complete
August 31, 2006 6:11:17 PM

*Durrrrr....*
August 31, 2006 6:17:52 PM

Quote:
Look at your CPU, can you see the core? No? That's because it has a heat spreader already on it. The reason they rec. only putting a little dab on is because of that heat spreader. Follow that advice. I have no idea what half these people are saying, but DON'T LISTEN TO THEM. This could really jack your computer up. Just follow the advice on AS's website, they know what they're talking about. Grain of rice man, grain of rice. I usually put a tiny dot each on cpu and heat sink, then buff it completely off with a lint-free towel. Then I follow their advice. If you try to spread it out evenly, you'll put too much on, and your temps will go way up. WAY up. Don't do it.

I'm not sure why you're replying to me with that when basically you said what I said but with less detail. I'm just going to ignore it and assume you're just too lazy to scroll up and reply to the OP. I gave good advice.

Actually, I meant to quote someone else and didn't read what I had quoted. Sorry about that, please don't take offense. And yes, I am lazy, but I refuse to apologize for THAT.
I
'm glad we agree on the proper way to put on AS5, why on earth people want to argue about this is completely beyond me. Good thing there's NO way you could permanently damage your CPU or mobo.....

And one further question, all this "grain of rice" talk.... Does this refer to long-grain wild rice, Jasmine rice, sticky rice, or some kind of rice I've never even heard of?
August 31, 2006 7:16:50 PM

FYI, that's uncooked short-grain white rice.
August 31, 2006 8:10:08 PM

Quote:
FYI, that's uncooked short-grain white rice.


Basmati or Jasmine?
August 31, 2006 8:15:50 PM

arborio, maybe
!