file permissions @@@

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

When logged on locally what is the resulting permissions if both shared and
NTFS permissions are set.. I think I have read that ONLY the shared
permissions would take effect , is this correct ?

-Thanks again
Darren
2 answers Last reply
More about file permissions
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    Nope, just the opposite. When logging on locally, the shared permissions
    don't apply, UNLESS for some reason you decide to connect to the shares.

    Example: D:\ shared as GROUPS, then connect to something like
    \\localhost\groups. Then, you would have both NTFS and share permissions
    efective.

    If you go to D:\ , then only the NTFS permissions will be effective.

    I've read in a few places, that it's best to leave the share permissions
    at default, which is Full Control for Everyone, and then restrict rights
    on the actual file system. This way, you don't need to look in 2 places
    to determine what the effective file rights are.

    If you're sharing from something non-NT (W98, etc), then share
    permissions are your only option. Hopefully you don't have to do that.

    Anyone else care to offer a good reason for using share permissions?
    -Sean


    Darren D wrote:

    > When logged on locally what is the resulting permissions if both shared and
    > NTFS permissions are set.. I think I have read that ONLY the shared
    > permissions would take effect , is this correct ?
    >
    > -Thanks again
    > Darren
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    Sean.. Thank you very much ,you're correct.. error on my end..

    "Sean M" <seanm@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:eMJjmxThEHA.3632@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Nope, just the opposite. When logging on locally, the shared permissions
    > don't apply, UNLESS for some reason you decide to connect to the shares.
    >
    > Example: D:\ shared as GROUPS, then connect to something like
    > \\localhost\groups. Then, you would have both NTFS and share permissions
    > efective.
    >
    > If you go to D:\ , then only the NTFS permissions will be effective.
    >
    > I've read in a few places, that it's best to leave the share permissions
    > at default, which is Full Control for Everyone, and then restrict rights
    > on the actual file system. This way, you don't need to look in 2 places
    > to determine what the effective file rights are.
    >
    > If you're sharing from something non-NT (W98, etc), then share
    > permissions are your only option. Hopefully you don't have to do that.
    >
    > Anyone else care to offer a good reason for using share permissions?
    > -Sean
    >
    >
    > Darren D wrote:
    >
    > > When logged on locally what is the resulting permissions if both shared
    and
    > > NTFS permissions are set.. I think I have read that ONLY the shared
    > > permissions would take effect , is this correct ?
    > >
    > > -Thanks again
    > > Darren
    > >
    > >
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