Japanese release?

Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

Did Japan ever see a localized version of Morrowind, on PC or Xbox? Every
search I do just leads me to an advocacy discussion, so I thought I'd just
ask the question anew. I'm interested to know if there were Japanese-
language voice files, if there was such a release.

Come to think of it, did the European releases have localized language
sound files? It'd be interesting to hear what the dialogue sounds like in
other languages. Or maybe it's interesting only to me. :)

-KKC, who would ask this question on the Penny Arcade forums, except that
they're not very friendly and welcoming over there...
--
--S.S.B. is the code name for America's daring, highly | kendrick @io .com
trained special mission force. Its purpose: to |
defend human freedom against al-Qaeda, a ruthless | Please don't use
terrorist organization determined to rule the world! | eBay. Ask me why.
9 answers Last reply
More about japanese release
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    Kendrick Kerwin Chua typed:
    > Did Japan ever see a localized version of Morrowind,
    > on PC or Xbox? Every search I do just leads me to an
    > advocacy discussion, so I thought I'd just ask the
    > question anew. I'm interested to know if there were
    > Japanese- language voice files, if there was such a
    > release.

    According to MobyGames (which is based on user submissions
    and may not be complete), no - Germany and Poland had there
    own releases, but I'm not sure if voices were localized.

    http://www.mobygames.com/game/elder-scrolls-iii-morrowind/release-info

    > Come to think of it, did the European releases have
    > localized language sound files? It'd be interesting to
    > hear what the dialogue sounds like in other languages.
    > Or maybe it's interesting only to me. :)

    I have the asia-pacific release and only get to hear boring
    ol' English. ;) (What, no elven?)


    --
    };> Matt v3.2 <.{

    <random sig>
    Give me ambiguity or give me something else.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    mec-devil wrote:
    >
    > According to MobyGames (which is based on user submissions
    > and may not be complete), no - Germany and Poland had there
    > own releases, but I'm not sure if voices were localized.
    >
    FYI, the German version has localized voices.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    In article <dec4ti$vnp$02$1@news.t-online.com>,
    Guido Hörster <Guido_Hoerster@t-online.de> wrote:
    >mec-devil wrote:
    >>
    >> According to MobyGames (which is based on user submissions
    >> and may not be complete), no - Germany and Poland had there
    >> own releases, but I'm not sure if voices were localized.
    >>
    >FYI, the German version has localized voices.

    Okay, prepare for language-geek conversation... Did the voice greetings in
    the German version vary between colloquial and high German depending on
    your disposition scores and fame ranking? Come to think of it, the
    majority of the text dialogue should exhibit this kind of variation as
    well. Part of the reason I'm interested in any possible Japanese version
    is that I'd like to see how the dialogue gets more and more formal as the
    player characters achieves a higher status. This is the kind of cultural
    shade of grey you don't generally see in the English language, especially
    not in American English.

    I have no practical ability to communicate in German, but it's my
    understanding that most software localized for Deutschland is made to err
    on the side of caution and renders most text and dialogue exclusively in
    formal, high German. I might be mistaken on that point, and I'll happily
    entertain any correction.

    -KKC, who has half a mind to get some amateurs together and record his own
    Japanese voice files for no particular reason...
    --
    --S.S.B. is the code name for America's daring, highly | kendrick @io .com
    trained special mission force. Its purpose: to |
    defend human freedom against al-Qaeda, a ruthless | Please don't use
    terrorist organization determined to rule the world! | eBay. Ask me why.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    Kendrick Kerwin Chua wrote:
    > In article <dec4ti$vnp$02$1@news.t-online.com>,
    > Guido Hörster <Guido_Hoerster@t-online.de> wrote:
    >
    >>mec-devil wrote:
    >>
    >>>According to MobyGames (which is based on user submissions
    >>>and may not be complete), no - Germany and Poland had there
    >>>own releases, but I'm not sure if voices were localized.
    >>>
    >>
    >>FYI, the German version has localized voices.
    >
    >
    > Okay, prepare for language-geek conversation... Did the voice greetings in
    > the German version vary between colloquial and high German depending on
    > your disposition scores and fame ranking? Come to think of it, the
    > majority of the text dialogue should exhibit this kind of variation as
    > well. Part of the reason I'm interested in any possible Japanese version
    > is that I'd like to see how the dialogue gets more and more formal as the
    > player characters achieves a higher status. This is the kind of cultural
    > shade of grey you don't generally see in the English language, especially
    > not in American English.
    >
    As the reputation of the player's character rises, the people start to
    interact with more respect but they do that like they do in the English
    version (The "It is such an honour to meet you" instead of "Outsiders
    are not welcome" blablabla). I got the impression that the English and
    German versions are almost identical on this point.
    I don't understand the terms "colloquial" and "high": Does it mean the
    difference how people with higher or lower education construct sentences
    with the same meaning?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    "Kendrick Kerwin Chua" <kendrick@fnord.io.com> wrote in message
    news:BNGdnZlMOMbEWZTeRVn-iw@io.com...

    > Part of the reason I'm interested in any possible Japanese version
    > is that I'd like to see how the dialogue gets more and more formal as the
    > player characters achieves a higher status.

    If would be nearly impossible to implement, because YOUR character would
    also have to reflect the various levels of politeness (rough, casual, normal
    polite, keigo, etc.), plus all characters would have to reflect exhaltive
    forms, etc. For example, if you spoke to Caius, you would have to use the
    exhaltive form, and he would speak down to you, etc.

    It would never happen.

    Most games don't use levels of politness. They use a casual form that isn't
    used in the real world (which is why it's a very bad idea to learn Japanese
    from Manga or video games, or anime for that matter). It always cracks me
    up when American Otaku try to speak Japanese that they learned from Manga,
    etc. to a native Japanese speaker. I wonder if they realize that they sound
    like complete idiots.

    I'm fluent in Japanese, in case you're wondering.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    In article <deci19$t2h$04$1@news.t-online.com>,
    Guido Hörster <Guido_Hoerster@t-online.de> wrote:
    >Kendrick Kerwin Chua wrote:
    >>
    >> Okay, prepare for language-geek conversation... Did the voice greetings in
    >> the German version vary between colloquial and high German depending on
    >> your disposition scores and fame ranking? Come to think of it, the
    <snip>
    >I don't understand the terms "colloquial" and "high": Does it mean the
    >difference how people with higher or lower education construct sentences
    >with the same meaning?

    I might be using the terminology wrong, but I was thinking about the the
    informal use of the second-person pronoun specifically. Referring to other
    people as 'du' when they were of little consequence or regard, and then as
    'sie' as they became more prominent or important.

    This kind of vocabulary shift gets ridiculous in Japanese and other Asian
    languages, to the point where you have to have an entirely different
    dictionary depending on your relationship with whomever you're talking to.
    I've always thought that the job of localizing video games for different
    languages is incredibly difficult, since there will be cultural aspects to
    any game that just don't carry over.

    -KKC, who declares lunchtime.
    --
    --S.S.B. is the code name for America's daring, highly | kendrick @io .com
    trained special mission force. Its purpose: to |
    defend human freedom against al-Qaeda, a ruthless | Please don't use
    terrorist organization determined to rule the world! | eBay. Ask me why.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    The REAL Pope Emperor FrogMaN wrote:
    > "Kendrick Kerwin Chua" <kendrick@fnord.io.com> wrote in message
    > news:BNGdnZlMOMbEWZTeRVn-iw@io.com...
    >
    >
    >>Part of the reason I'm interested in any possible Japanese version
    >>is that I'd like to see how the dialogue gets more and more formal as the
    >>player characters achieves a higher status.
    >
    >
    > If would be nearly impossible to implement, because YOUR character would
    > also have to reflect the various levels of politeness (rough, casual, normal
    > polite, keigo, etc.), plus all characters would have to reflect exhaltive
    > forms, etc. For example, if you spoke to Caius, you would have to use the
    > exhaltive form, and he would speak down to you, etc.
    >
    > It would never happen.
    >
    > Most games don't use levels of politness. They use a casual form that isn't
    > used in the real world (which is why it's a very bad idea to learn Japanese
    > from Manga or video games, or anime for that matter). It always cracks me
    > up when American Otaku try to speak Japanese that they learned from Manga,
    > etc. to a native Japanese speaker. I wonder if they realize that they sound
    > like complete idiots.
    >

    Daggerfall allowed for the use of differing levels of politeness when
    talking to people. Depending on who you were talking to and their
    status had some bearing on their response.


    > I'm fluent in Japanese, in case you're wondering.
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    Kendrick Kerwin Chua wrote:
    >
    > I might be using the terminology wrong, but I was thinking about the the
    > informal use of the second-person pronoun specifically. Referring to other
    > people as 'du' when they were of little consequence or regard, and then as
    > 'sie' as they became more prominent or important.
    >
    Oh, I see the point: "Du" is normally used between non-adults or when
    adults are speaking to non-adults or when the two persons are close
    friends or relatives. "Sie" is usually used between eg. business
    partners and typically signals personal distance. If someone becomes
    closer after some time, the older person may offer the "Du" to the
    younger person or a boss may offer the "Du" to someone who works for
    him. Years ago I had the strange situation that my boss was five years
    younger than me. Neither of us dared to offer the "Du" for obvious
    reasons. The situation resolved itself during a party of a common friend
    whom of course we both adressed with "Du". Although the younger person
    may reject the "Du" it is very uncommon to do so. The "Du" can change
    back to "Sie" if the two involved persons relation changed to the worse
    but this is also very uncommon.
    There is also a very common use of "Sie" in conjunction with the first
    name instead of the usual Herr/Frau <last name> when you eg. have
    established a long business relationship or eg. between your
    girlfriends/boyfriends parents and you as long they haven't offered the
    "Du".

    The decision for "Du" or "Sie" has formally nothing to do with the
    prominence or importance of a person. In fact, to a certain degree being
    prominent means you have to accept that more unknown people (eg. fans)
    think they may say "Du" although they are not very close related to the
    prominent person. This might come from the impression that a fan
    typically feels close to his prominent idol but the fan is normally a
    totally unknown person from the prominent's point of view.

    For Computer-RPGs the hero is often directly adressed to as "Ihr" which
    is in the tradition of "pluralis majestatis". Kings have been adressed
    to by using 2nd person plural but today all of these titles are obsolete
    in German society. You might remember our former Minister of Economics
    "Otto Graf Lambsdorff". Before titles like "Graf" (comes close to
    "Count") were obsolete you correctly had to say "Graf Otto Lambsdorff".

    I haven't played the German Morrowind for quite some time because
    "Wizard's Island" is not localized but iirc the hero is adressed to as
    "Ihr" right from the start.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.games.morrowind (More info?)

    "Michael W. Ryder" <_mwryder@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:o3pOe.124370$5N3.95168@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > The REAL Pope Emperor FrogMaN wrote:
    > >
    > > Most games don't use levels of politness. They use a casual form that
    isn't
    > > used in the real world (which is why it's a very bad idea to learn
    Japanese
    > > from Manga or video games, or anime for that matter). It always cracks
    me
    > > up when American Otaku try to speak Japanese that they learned from
    Manga,
    > > etc. to a native Japanese speaker. I wonder if they realize that they
    sound
    > > like complete idiots.
    > >
    >
    > Daggerfall allowed for the use of differing levels of politeness when
    > talking to people. Depending on who you were talking to and their
    > status had some bearing on their response.

    In what language?
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