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I want a GPS Sat Nav

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January 10, 2005 12:03:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
get.
1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
calculation time once on route?
4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?

More about : gps sat nav

January 10, 2005 12:03:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I have an I-MATE PDA and use a NAVMAN GPS Sat Nav and love it -- easy to load
new maps when I travel.

"Michael" wrote:

> I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> get.
> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?
> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 12:03:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Dell Axim has blue tooth built in and works great.. 400MHZ is good to keep
up while driving with a GPS
NAVMAN is the software my son uses with his iPaq,, and is happy it gives a
route with voice..
They have both USB and BT GPS units..


"Michael" <michgrea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5g63u0t5itrh6l778otae8iuho4htkjshc@4ax.com...
>I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> get.
> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?
> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>
>
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
January 10, 2005 1:48:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Good for you!

So you didn't answer any of the questions he asked I noticed.


"JR" <JR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:79C67650-0432-4CF2-B5F9-B5D5D44C9458@microsoft.com...
> I have an I-MATE PDA and use a NAVMAN GPS Sat Nav and love it -- easy to
load
> new maps when I travel.
>
> "Michael" wrote:
>
> > I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> > get.
> > 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
> > 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
> > 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> > calculation time once on route?
> > 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 5:04:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Inline:

"Michael" <michgrea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5g63u0t5itrh6l778otae8iuho4htkjshc@4ax.com...
> I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> get.
> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
400Mhz, dual memory card support is you don't do BT. You'll want your maps
on a memory card as they can be big and if you keep several like I do
because I drive off on map and onto another you will need the storage.

> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
Not any of the prime players as long as you stay with the upper models.

> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?
Mine recalculates very quick so I don't think it's that big a deal either
way, loading the app and maps is where memory and CPU matter.

> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
I like mine but I am still looking for the right software. Maps are the pain
as they are big, may not cover the area you want or you may move from one
map to another in mid drive.

>
>
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 10:17:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Michael wrote:
> I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> get.
> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?
> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?

The faster the better, processor speed has some bearing on route calculation
speed but the main reason is to give you some future protection.

Ensure the PDA you choose has Bluetooth unless it is one of the PocketPC/GPS
units i.e. the Mitac Mio 168. Route calculation is alos affected by memory
card speed, make and type, this is more important than processor speed.

They're far from expensive toys, they're better navigation devices than
those factory fitted in cars these days and have matured rapidly.

See our site for reviews and forums.

--
Darren Griffin
PocketGPSWorld - www.pocketgpsworld.com
The Premier GPS Resource for News, Reviews and Forums
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 3:10:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?

Go for minimum 400MHz. Not so much because of the time used for
calculations, but specially because the 400MHz processor is much more
efficient in saving battery for you.

> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?

Avoid the Ipaq 1715, and any model that is very old like the 1910 or 1930.
Look for devices that AT LEAST have internal Bluetooth (better if they also
have WiFi).

> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?

I have answered that in the first answer. It will take double time, but you
won't feel it in most cases. However, the old 200MHz devices drain the
batteries in 2 hours, while with the new devices you can get 5-6 continuous
hours of use between charges.

> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?

I have an iMate with a Mobile Crossing Bluetooth GPS, and use Destinator. I
can say that I don't go anywhere without it. In one occasion I can almost
say it saved my life. People that are not used to them would call them toys,
but after you get used to using them they become a very important
productivity tool.

>
>

--
********************************************************
Helio Diamant - MS-MVP/Mobile Devices
Editor-in-Chief
Pocket PC Freak - The Hebrew Pocket PC site
http://www.pocketpcfreak.com
********************************************************
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 2:41:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Michael,

You've gotten some pretty good input up to this point...

I'd just like to voice a vote for the new TomTom 2004 bluetooth GPS and
Navigator software (bought in a bundle with software and the GPS receiver).
The 3-D display is awesome. You can load state maps or multi-state regions.
You have your choice of several voices to receive audible turn-by-turn
directions from. Screen is switchable from day to night colors (night is
much more subdued and won't ruin your night vision. Each (day/night) comes
with several choices of color combination.

As to the PDA, as others have said you want at least 400mhz processor. I
myself have the iPAQ hx4700 with a 624Mhz XScale processor.

The TomTom Navigator software replots almost instantly when I drive through
a suggested turn. I've not yet to find a spot that wasn't on the available
maps of both Texas and Florida where I spend most of my time. The even had
a new Italian restarurant listed in the "points of interest" in my hometown
that has been open just over a year

Hope this helps...

Terry


"Michael" <michgrea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5g63u0t5itrh6l778otae8iuho4htkjshc@4ax.com...
>I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
> get.
> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
> calculation time once on route?
> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>
>
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 2:51:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

You might go take a look at microsoft.public.pocketpc.marketplace...

The following post from there might get you up and running with one
purchase:



"Ian Ruderman" <ian@ruderman.org> wrote in message
news:<f6JAd.25656$Cs3.5218@fe10.lga>...

> Hi,

>

> I'm selling an iPaq 2215 in excellent condition with the following :

>

> Leather case from Sena, a Wi-Fi CF card, and ALK's Co-Pilot Live 4 with

> a Bluetooth receiver.

>

> Asking $450 plus shipping for the whole lot.

>

> Ian

>
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 1:31:39 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

T.A.Austin wrote:
> Michael,
>
> You've gotten some pretty good input up to this point...
>
> I'd just like to voice a vote for the new TomTom 2004 bluetooth GPS
> and Navigator software (bought in a bundle with software and the GPS
> receiver). The 3-D display is awesome. You can load state maps or
> multi-state regions. You have your choice of several voices to
> receive audible turn-by-turn directions from. Screen is switchable
> from day to night colors (night is much more subdued and won't ruin your
> night vision. Each (day/night) comes with several choices of
> color combination.
> As to the PDA, as others have said you want at least 400mhz
> processor. I myself have the iPAQ hx4700 with a 624Mhz XScale
> processor.
> The TomTom Navigator software replots almost instantly when I drive
> through a suggested turn. I've not yet to find a spot that wasn't on
> the available maps of both Texas and Florida where I spend most of my
> time. The even had a new Italian restarurant listed in the "points
> of interest" in my hometown that has been open just over a year

And we have just posted a full review of TomTom navigator 2004 USA.

--
Darren Griffin
PocketGPSWorld - www.pocketgpsworld.com
The Premier GPS Resource for News, Reviews and Forums
January 11, 2005 10:14:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I recommend the iPAQ 2210 with TomTom3 and this stonking CF card antenna
that is fast acting, super accurate, and even gets a good position fix
inside my house! http://www.pocketgps.co.uk/sysonchipcfplus.php

Being direct mounted, there are not extra leads, no extra batteries to go
flat, and the whole thing can even be used whilst walking. I even plan to
buy the connection lead to plug my iPAQ in to the excellent Autocom(tm)
intercom that I use on my motorbike, with the unit and antenna sitting in
the transparent topped tank bag that I go touring with. I found TomTom3 to
be a doddle to learn, and it even allows me to navigate to people defined in
my Outlook contact for whom I have the address saved. The company I
purchased from (http://www.globalpositioningsystems.co.uk) also gave me a
free speed camera download and link to collect free updates.

So, I am truly delighted with exactly this setup.




"T.A.Austin" <bitbucket@dev.null> wrote in message
news:JxEEd.530$2e7.18@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> You might go take a look at microsoft.public.pocketpc.marketplace...
>
> The following post from there might get you up and running with one
> purchase:
>
>
>
> "Ian Ruderman" <ian@ruderman.org> wrote in message
> news:<f6JAd.25656$Cs3.5218@fe10.lga>...
>
> > Hi,
>
> >
>
> > I'm selling an iPaq 2215 in excellent condition with the following :
>
> >
>
> > Leather case from Sena, a Wi-Fi CF card, and ALK's Co-Pilot Live 4 with
>
> > a Bluetooth receiver.
>
> >
>
> > Asking $450 plus shipping for the whole lot.
>
> >
>
> > Ian
>
> >
>
>
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 10:54:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Voyager wrote:
> The company I purchased from
> (http://www.globalpositioningsystems.co.uk) also gave me a free speed
> camera download and link to collect free updates.

I assume that the link is to our database? That is free to all so I'd be
careful of giving them extra credit for pointing you in our direction! A
simple Google for Safety Camera Database would have yielded the same
information.
--
Darren Griffin
PocketGPSWorld - www.pocketgpsworld.com
The Premier GPS Resource for News, Reviews and Forums
January 12, 2005 12:05:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 12:10:55 +0200, "Helio Diamant - MS-MVP/Mobile
Devices" <helio@nospam.pocketpcfreak.com> wrote:

>> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
>
>Go for minimum 400MHz. Not so much because of the time used for
>calculations, but specially because the 400MHz processor is much more
>efficient in saving battery for you.
>
>> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
>
>Avoid the Ipaq 1715, and any model that is very old like the 1910 or 1930.
>Look for devices that AT LEAST have internal Bluetooth (better if they also
>have WiFi).
>
>> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
>> calculation time once on route?
>
>I have answered that in the first answer. It will take double time, but you
>won't feel it in most cases. However, the old 200MHz devices drain the
>batteries in 2 hours, while with the new devices you can get 5-6 continuous
>hours of use between charges.
>
>> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>
>I have an iMate with a Mobile Crossing Bluetooth GPS, and use Destinator. I
>can say that I don't go anywhere without it. In one occasion I can almost
>say it saved my life. People that are not used to them would call them toys,
>but after you get used to using them they become a very important
>productivity tool.
>
>>
>>
Thanks for input, everything you say makes sense. I have a clearer
path to follow.

> In one occasion I can almost say it saved my life.
Please tell me, I am intrigued :-)
January 12, 2005 12:06:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 02:04:44 GMT, "James B" <nospam@here.com> wrote:

>Inline:
>
>"Michael" <michgrea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:5g63u0t5itrh6l778otae8iuho4htkjshc@4ax.com...
>> I want a GPS Sat Nav preferably with BT but I do not know which PDA to
>> get.
>> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
>400Mhz, dual memory card support is you don't do BT. You'll want your maps
>on a memory card as they can be big and if you keep several like I do
>because I drive off on map and onto another you will need the storage.
>
>> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
>Not any of the prime players as long as you stay with the upper models.
>
>> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
>> calculation time once on route?
>Mine recalculates very quick so I don't think it's that big a deal either
>way, loading the app and maps is where memory and CPU matter.
>
>> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>I like mine but I am still looking for the right software. Maps are the pain
>as they are big, may not cover the area you want or you may move from one
>map to another in mid drive.
>
>>
>>
>
Thanks
January 12, 2005 12:06:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:41:02 GMT, "T.A.Austin" <bitbucket@dev.null>
wrote:

>Michael,
>
>You've gotten some pretty good input up to this point...
>
>I'd just like to voice a vote for the new TomTom 2004 bluetooth GPS and
>Navigator software (bought in a bundle with software and the GPS receiver).
>The 3-D display is awesome. You can load state maps or multi-state regions.
>You have your choice of several voices to receive audible turn-by-turn
>directions from. Screen is switchable from day to night colors (night is
>much more subdued and won't ruin your night vision. Each (day/night) comes
>with several choices of color combination.
>
>As to the PDA, as others have said you want at least 400mhz processor. I
>myself have the iPAQ hx4700 with a 624Mhz XScale processor.
>
>The TomTom Navigator software replots almost instantly when I drive through
>a suggested turn. I've not yet to find a spot that wasn't on the available
>maps of both Texas and Florida where I spend most of my time. The even had
>a new Italian restarurant listed in the "points of interest" in my hometown
>that has been open just over a year
>
>Hope this helps...
>
>Terry
>
Thanks
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:13:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I use an rz1710 and Fortuna U2 GPS. Bottom of the line, works perfectly!


"Helio Diamant - MS-MVP/Mobile Devices" <helio@nospam.pocketpcfreak.com>
wrote in message news:o fvrEyv9EHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> 1. What is the minimum spec I should look for?
>
> Go for minimum 400MHz. Not so much because of the time used for
> calculations, but specially because the 400MHz processor is much more
> efficient in saving battery for you.
>
>> 2. Which PDA(s) should I avoid?
>
> Avoid the Ipaq 1715, and any model that is very old like the 1910 or 1930.
> Look for devices that AT LEAST have internal Bluetooth (better if they
> also have WiFi).
>
>> 3. From using a 200Mhz to a 400Mhz PDA is there much difference in the
>> calculation time once on route?
>
> I have answered that in the first answer. It will take double time, but
> you won't feel it in most cases. However, the old 200MHz devices drain the
> batteries in 2 hours, while with the new devices you can get 5-6
> continuous hours of use between charges.
>
>> 4. Are these GPS Sat Nav PDA worth having or are they expensive toys?
>
> I have an iMate with a Mobile Crossing Bluetooth GPS, and use Destinator.
> I can say that I don't go anywhere without it. In one occasion I can
> almost say it saved my life. People that are not used to them would call
> them toys, but after you get used to using them they become a very
> important productivity tool.
>
>>
>>
>
> --
> ********************************************************
> Helio Diamant - MS-MVP/Mobile Devices
> Editor-in-Chief
> Pocket PC Freak - The Hebrew Pocket PC site
> http://www.pocketpcfreak.com
> ********************************************************
>
!