Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

I have 10/100/1000 Mbps ports one side and two switches co..

Tags:
  • Routers
  • Switch
  • Ethernet Card
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
Share
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 10:08:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
speed?.

More about : 100 1000 mbps ports side switches

Anonymous
February 7, 2005 6:19:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <1107745719.881503.73700@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
<santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
:I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
:two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
:second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
:to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
:speed?.

No. Autonegotiation can only occur when both ends play along. If
one of the sides is fixed speed then the other side will what
the standards say to do when autonegotiation fails, which is to
set itself to 10 Mb/s half duplex -- no matter what the other end
of the link is set for.
--
Inevitably, someone will flame me about this .signature.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 6:19:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Walter Roberson wrote:

> In article <1107745719.881503.73700@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
> :I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
> :two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
> :second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
> :to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
> :speed?.
>
> No. Autonegotiation can only occur when both ends play along. If
> one of the sides is fixed speed then the other side will what
> the standards say to do when autonegotiation fails, which is to
> set itself to 10 Mb/s half duplex -- no matter what the other end
> of the link is set for.

If he has a 10baseT switch and a 100baseTX switch the gigabit switch should
negotiate the correct speed with each. Remember, there is hardware out
there that is only capable of running at one speed, although it's for the
most part pretty old.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 12:54:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Walter Roberson wrote:

> In article <cu7058012na@news3.newsguy.com>,
> J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> |Walter Roberson wrote:
>
> |> In article <1107745719.881503.73700@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> |> <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
> |> :I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
> |> :two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
> |> :second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
> |> :to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
> |> :speed?.
>
> |> No. Autonegotiation can only occur when both ends play along. If
>
> |If he has a 10baseT switch and a 100baseTX switch the gigabit switch
> |should negotiate the correct speed with each.
>
> And how exactly is it going to do that when it can't see the link
> pulses from the devices?
>
> |Remember, there is hardware out
> |there that is only capable of running at one speed, although it's for the
> |most part pretty old.
>
> The OP is saying that s/he has some of that equipment. One
> of the OP's switches runs at 100 Mbps ONLY and the other at 10 Mbps ONLY.
> There are not many devices out there [excluding gigabit] which
> support only one speed and yet will send out link pulses indicating
> that speed... what, after all, would such a device do if the other end
> indicated that it was only capable of running at a different speed?

By your reasoning a 100TX hub cannot cannot connect to a 10/100 switch or
NIC because autonegotiation would fail and the switch or NIC would fall
back to 10 which the hub can't support.

In the real world they connect just fine. Seems to me that the designers
know something that you don't. If I had time right now to get this rat's
nest of cables untangled I'd configure my system so that this post was
going through just such a channel.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 8:10:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <cu6mn9$hdk$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>,
roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote:

> In article <1107745719.881503.73700@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
> :I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
> :two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
> :second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
> :to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
> :speed?.
>
> No. Autonegotiation can only occur when both ends play along. If
> one of the sides is fixed speed then the other side will what
> the standards say to do when autonegotiation fails, which is to
> set itself to 10 Mb/s half duplex -- no matter what the other end
> of the link is set for.

No, the standard does NOT say that an Auto-Negotiating device should set
itself to 10 Mb/s half-duplex upon failure of Auto-Negotiation.

If by "failure" you mean that the link partner is not using FLP bursts
to advertise its capabilities, then Auto-Negotiation requires the use of
parallel detection. The device must be able to determine, through
passive observation, the signaling method used by the link partner, for
all signaling methods supported by the Auto-Negotiating device. If it
determines that the partner and the Auto-Negotiating device have a
signaling method in common, it should use that method. This means that
speed negotiation should work, regardless of whether the link partner
uses Auto-Negotiation.

Of course, duplexity will default to half-duplex; this is the "safest"
course of action. If the non-Auto-Negotiating partner has been manually
configured to operate in full-duplex mode, then communication problems
will likely result due to the mismatch. It is for this reason that the
standard states that Auto-Negotiation is "highly recommended" for
devices that are capable of full duplex operation.

If by "failure" you mean that the Auto-Negotiation process does not
result in a conclusion by the negotiating device as to the proper speed,
signaling, and duplexity to use, then the standard requires that the
device not enable the link for frame exchanges. (This is what those of
us in the standards community would mean by "Auto-Negotiation failure.")
Parallel detection is *part of* Auto-Negotiation; "Auto-Negotiation
failure" implies a failure of parallel detection as well as a failure of
FLP burst exchanges.

For what it's worth: I have heard innumerable anecdotal accounts of
devices that could not properly Auto-Negotiate, however I have never
personally observed such an event.


--
Rich Seifert Networks and Communications Consulting
21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700 Los Gatos, CA 95033
(408) 228-0803 FAX

Send replies to: usenet at richseifert dot com
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 8:57:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <cu7vq70278k@news4.newsguy.com>,
J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
:By your reasoning a 100TX hub cannot cannot connect to a 10/100 switch or
:NIC because autonegotiation would fail and the switch or NIC would fall
:back to 10 which the hub can't support.

:In the real world they connect just fine.

In my experience they don't, not unless you force the speed on
the 10/100 switch.
--
Are we *there* yet??
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 9:07:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

On 7 Feb 2005 03:19:05 GMT, roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter
Roberson) wrote:

>In article <1107745719.881503.73700@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
>:I have one Router with each port 10/100/1000 Mbps, I need to connect
>:two switches where one switch ports are at 100 Mbps only and where as
>:second switch ports are at 10 Mbps only. When I plugin my two switches
>:to Router ports, can be the ports auto-negotiated at their maximum
>:speed?.

>No. Autonegotiation can only occur when both ends play along. If
>one of the sides is fixed speed then the other side will what
>the standards say to do when autonegotiation fails, which is to
>set itself to 10 Mb/s half duplex -- no matter what the other end
>of the link is set for.

But would autonegotiate fail if one site is set to 100 Mb ?

Do you litteraly mean what you write "Autonegotiation can only
occur when both ends play along" which would imho imply that no
communications can occur unless both sites support auto negotiate
?
I would expect the negotiating site to detect the other site's
only capability on 100 Mb and thus settle for this speed.

--
Kind regards,
Gerard Bok
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 9:24:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <4207ad1d.28650246@News.Individual.NET>,
Gerard Bok <bok118@zonnet.nl> wrote:
|But would autonegotiate fail if one site is set to 100 Mb ?

|Do you litteraly mean what you write "Autonegotiation can only
|occur when both ends play along" which would imho imply that no
|communications can occur unless both sites support auto negotiate

|I would expect the negotiating site to detect the other site's
|only capability on 100 Mb and thus settle for this speed.

Older equipment that literally cannot run at speeds other than
10 or 100 Mb often *in practice* did not get parallel link
speed detection to work, and so the autonegotiating end often
could not match speeds. Parallel link detect of speed is "supposed"
to work, but in reality it failed a non-trivial number of times,
including some well known cases involving some of the biggest
vendors in the business.

But that's speed detection. There is not parallel duplex detection
facility at all for 10 or 100, so if the fixed link was 10 Full
or 100 Full, even if the speed detection went okay, the link
able to do the autonegotiation would go for 10 Half and 100 Half.
See for example Table 1 in Sun's "Ethernet Autonegotiation Best
Practices" whitepaper, http://www.sun.com/blueprints/0704/817-7526.pdf
--
Those were borogoves and the momerathsoutgrabe completely mimsy.
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 3:40:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Rich Seifert wrote:

(snip)

> For what it's worth: I have heard innumerable anecdotal accounts of
> devices that could not properly Auto-Negotiate, however I have never
> personally observed such an event.

If it happens, how do you decide which end failed?

I only once ran into a problem, connecting an Asante 10baseT
Macintosh to a 3com 10/100 dual speed repeater, I believe
a 3C16611.

The result was that the link light on the Asante would blink
at about 1Hz, and the connection did not work. The board was
probably designed before fast ethernet and auto-negotiation,
and the manual had no description for such a blink mode.

Connected to my old favorite, 3C16671 it worked fine.

-- glen
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 7:17:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Rich Seifert <usenet@richseifert.com.invalid> writes:

> No, the standard does NOT say that an Auto-Negotiating device
> should set itself to 10 Mb/s half-duplex upon failure of
> Auto-Negotiation.

As far as I understand it, it is possible to determine the speed the
other side is talking by the encoding method of the bits. It cannot
determine whether the other side is full- or half-duplex.

> For what it's worth: I have heard innumerable anecdotal accounts of
> devices that could not properly Auto-Negotiate, however I have
> never personally observed such an event.

I have. Specifically Sun's hme interface talking to Cisco
switches. This was in two different jobs. The solution in both cases
was simply to peg both sides at 100/Full.

--
David Magda <dmagda at ee.ryerson.ca>, http://www.magda.ca/
Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under
the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well
under the new. -- Niccolo Machiavelli, _The Prince_, Chapter VI
!