dual booting ME & W2K off separate drives

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

I've just installed ME on one hard drive and W2K Pro on another. My question
deals with drive letter configuations. Both Drives are Western Digitals.
Drive 1 is 13.6 G. Drive 2 is 80 G. Drive 2 was partitioned into a pair of
10G drives and one 60G drive (numbers rounded). When I boot up into the
different systems, here's what the computer sees. (a: is 3.5 drive for both)

Booting up in ME
C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
D: Unused 10G part of Drive 2.
E: Unused 60G part of Drive 2.
F: CD-ROM
G: CD-DVD

Booting up in W2K Pro
C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
D: W2K Pro on Drive 1
E: Unused 10G part of Drive 2
F: Unused 60G part of Drive 2
G: CD-ROM
H: CD-DVD

Drive 2 with W2K Pro is NTFS. Drive 1 with W2K is FAT32. I know ME doesn't
recognize NTFS, so I understand why when the system is in ME mode it won't
see Drive 2.
My concern is having having different drive letters between the two OS. Only
C: is common to both drives. All the other drive letters differ depending on
the OS i'm using. Will this cause problems down the road? I'm still in the
"rebuilding" process for both drives (started over, reformatted drives,
installed ME first, installed W2K Pro second) and I've run into a few
glitches (browser freezes up trying to go to second page using Explorer 6)
but again, I haven't finished all the updates, reloads, ect ... Any help or
advice would be greatly appreciated.
System:
A7V8X-X Motherboard
AMD 2200 Athlon CPU
1048 K of Ram (already limited to 512 in ME)
Internet via Cable Modem
5 answers Last reply
More about dual booting separate drives
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    Hi, Staggerlee.

    You might want to take a look at a couple of KB articles:
    Order in Which MS-DOS and Windows Assign Drive Letters
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/51978/EN-US/

    How Windows 2000 Assigns, Reserves, and Stores Drive Letters
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/234048/EN-US/

    As the WinXP Pro Resource Kit says, "Windows XP Professional and Windows
    2000 assign drive letters differently from how Windows 98, Windows Me, and
    Windows NT 4.0 assign drive letters. Therefore, if the computer starts
    multiple operating systems, the drive letters might vary depending on which
    operating system is running."
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prkb_cnc_vzqu.asp

    (I can't always get the URL for a specific page in the RK, so you may have
    to drill down to:
    Welcome > Part II Desktop Management > Ch 12 Disk Management > Managing
    Volumes During Windows XP Professional Setup> Creating Volumes During
    Windows XP Professional Setup)

    See if these references explain what you are seeing.

    Of course, only we humans will be confused with different drive letters
    between the two Windows versions. But we will be booted into only one
    version at a time, and the Windows we are running at the time will not be
    confused, since it will have no idea what letters the other version might
    have assigned. As you probably know, you can change drive letters, except
    for the System and Boot volumes, by using Device Manager in WinME and Disk
    Management in Win2K. If you specifically assign letters, Windows will
    attempt to use those same letters persistently; otherwise, letters are
    assigned anew each time you reboot, based on the hardware configuration at
    that time, in the orders explained in the KB articles.

    You did not tell us whether all of your volumes are primary partitions or
    whether some are logical drives in extended partitions. It makes a
    difference in the order in which letters are assigned. You also did not say
    which partition on each drive is marked Active (bootable).

    You also did not specifically say that you are using the dual-boot method
    built into Win2K. With this method, common to all NT-type versions of
    Windows (WinNT4/2K/XP), there is only one System Partition for the computer,
    plus a Boot Volume for each Windows installation. The boot process always
    starts on the System Partition (typically Drive C:), then branches to
    whichever volume holds the Windows version selected from the opening menu.

    As you can see from the plain-text file, C:\boot.ini, the computer locates
    Win2K by rdisk(#)partition(#), rather than by drive letter. Rdisk(#) is the
    physical drive number, starting with zero; partition(#) starts with one on
    each HD. So the single partition on your first HD would be
    rdisk(0)partition(1). The first partition on your second HD would be
    rdisk(1)partition(1), but WinME is not located by this reference. The last
    line in C:\boot.ini should be:
    C:\="Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition"
    or something similar. The label inside the quotes doesn't matter to the
    computer; it is there only to provide the text for the opening menu so that
    we humans will know which menu item is WinME. When we select WinME, it uses
    C:\msdos.sys to locate and load WinME, just as if we were booting into a
    WinME-only computer.

    You may want to rethink your partition lineup to make it easier on yourself.
    When I was dual-booting Win98 and WinXP, I created a small primary partition
    at the front of my first HD and formatted it FAT(16) for maximum
    compatibility. The rest of my HD became an extended partition, divided into
    logical drives. When I added a second HD, I made it all an extended
    partition with logical drives (except for a very small primary partition at
    the beginning, which I can use for booting if the first HD fails). So long
    as I continued to run Win98, I kept all my volumes formatted FAT, so that I
    could access them from either Windows version. (After retiring Win98, I
    converted all the logical drives to NTFS.) I installed Win98 into
    E:\Windows, then installed Win2K into D:\WinNT; D: and E: were logical
    drives on HDD0, my first physical drive. Over the years, logical drives
    have come and gone, but I still use the same basic pattern: C: is the
    System Partition; D: is my main Windows version (now WinXP); other volumes
    contain my programs, data, other operating systems (such as a parallel
    installation of WinXP, Longhorn), and whatever I feel like putting there. I
    keep letters for CD/DVD drives, USB "thumb" drives, cameras, etc., further
    out in the alphabet (S:, V:, W:, etc.) to avoid having to change HD volume
    letters when something gets added or removed. I much prefer using DM
    (Device Manager or Disk Management) to assign letters that suit me than
    settling for "the luck of the draw".

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@corridor.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP

    "staggerlee228" <staggerlee228@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:D4C9E2D8-A9E3-4959-9E64-6285C2EFDDB3@microsoft.com...
    > I've just installed ME on one hard drive and W2K Pro on another. My
    > question
    > deals with drive letter configuations. Both Drives are Western Digitals.
    > Drive 1 is 13.6 G. Drive 2 is 80 G. Drive 2 was partitioned into a pair of
    > 10G drives and one 60G drive (numbers rounded). When I boot up into the
    > different systems, here's what the computer sees. (a: is 3.5 drive for
    > both)
    >
    > Booting up in ME
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: Unused 10G part of Drive 2.
    > E: Unused 60G part of Drive 2.
    > F: CD-ROM
    > G: CD-DVD
    >
    > Booting up in W2K Pro
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: W2K Pro on Drive 1
    > E: Unused 10G part of Drive 2
    > F: Unused 60G part of Drive 2
    > G: CD-ROM
    > H: CD-DVD
    >
    > Drive 2 with W2K Pro is NTFS. Drive 1 with W2K is FAT32. I know ME doesn't
    > recognize NTFS, so I understand why when the system is in ME mode it won't
    > see Drive 2.
    > My concern is having having different drive letters between the two OS.
    > Only
    > C: is common to both drives. All the other drive letters differ depending
    > on
    > the OS i'm using. Will this cause problems down the road? I'm still in the
    > "rebuilding" process for both drives (started over, reformatted drives,
    > installed ME first, installed W2K Pro second) and I've run into a few
    > glitches (browser freezes up trying to go to second page using Explorer 6)
    > but again, I haven't finished all the updates, reloads, ect ... Any help
    > or
    > advice would be greatly appreciated.
    > System:
    > A7V8X-X Motherboard
    > AMD 2200 Athlon CPU
    > 1048 K of Ram (already limited to 512 in ME)
    > Internet via Cable Modem
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    It's because the boot record is on one drive only. A small technical
    note here: your drives are actually HDD0 and HDD1. Usually the boot
    info is on HDD0, what you refer as Hard Drive 1. When you installed W2k
    the active partition on HDD0 was already used by ME and W2K used the
    active partition on HDD1 and assigned it drive letter D because C was
    already used, follows a simple logic. Whether or not this will cause
    any problems is somewhat debatable, it doesn't really matter all that
    much but it makes it annoying and a bit more confusing to maintain the
    operating system when it doesn't reside on C.

    Personally I have found that the easiest way to tackle the problem is to
    install the operating systems to their respective drives while the other
    drive is unplugged or turned off in the BIOS, then use a third party
    boot manager to load the operating system. Your operating systems will
    be on drive C but the rest of your drive letter assignments will still
    be illogical in your thinking but not so in the thinking of the
    operating system. For example, W2K will see itself on drive C on the
    drive where it is installed but will probably see ME on the other drive
    as drive D, because of the active status of the drive. ME of course
    wont see the NTFS drives so the drive letter assignments won't seem so
    out of whack. As to the CD/DVD drive letters they will be different on
    both OS but they will or should take their letter assignment after the
    hard drive partitions.

    John

    staggerlee228 wrote:
    > I've just installed ME on one hard drive and W2K Pro on another. My question
    > deals with drive letter configuations. Both Drives are Western Digitals.
    > Drive 1 is 13.6 G. Drive 2 is 80 G. Drive 2 was partitioned into a pair of
    > 10G drives and one 60G drive (numbers rounded). When I boot up into the
    > different systems, here's what the computer sees. (a: is 3.5 drive for both)
    >
    > Booting up in ME
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: Unused 10G part of Drive 2.
    > E: Unused 60G part of Drive 2.
    > F: CD-ROM
    > G: CD-DVD
    >
    > Booting up in W2K Pro
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: W2K Pro on Drive 1
    > E: Unused 10G part of Drive 2
    > F: Unused 60G part of Drive 2
    > G: CD-ROM
    > H: CD-DVD
    >
    > Drive 2 with W2K Pro is NTFS. Drive 1 with W2K is FAT32. I know ME doesn't
    > recognize NTFS, so I understand why when the system is in ME mode it won't
    > see Drive 2.
    > My concern is having having different drive letters between the two OS. Only
    > C: is common to both drives. All the other drive letters differ depending on
    > the OS i'm using. Will this cause problems down the road? I'm still in the
    > "rebuilding" process for both drives (started over, reformatted drives,
    > installed ME first, installed W2K Pro second) and I've run into a few
    > glitches (browser freezes up trying to go to second page using Explorer 6)
    > but again, I haven't finished all the updates, reloads, ect ... Any help or
    > advice would be greatly appreciated.
    > System:
    > A7V8X-X Motherboard
    > AMD 2200 Athlon CPU
    > 1048 K of Ram (already limited to 512 in ME)
    > Internet via Cable Modem
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    Thanks for the information. In answer to the primary/logical drive question,
    the 13G drive is all primary. On the 80G, the first 10G is the primary while
    the other 10G and the 60G parts are logical drives. I'm also using W2K to
    manage the dual booting. My main reason for the split was to keep my programs
    and things I use on one complete drive while my kids older programs that
    won't run on W2K reside elsewhere. My fear at this point is having to
    rearrange everything after I managed to get both systems working. I think
    I'll be fine as long as the computer knows what it's doing depending on which
    system I'm working on. I guess I just want to make sure that any "automatic"
    function (program installations, for example) will know where it's suppose to
    go. I've continued working to get both system's back to normal, and so far so
    good. I still, however, want to be sure I'm not setting myself up for a
    bigger problem later (reinstalling all the stuff needed for both system ain't
    fun).
    Staggerlee


    "staggerlee228" wrote:

    > I've just installed ME on one hard drive and W2K Pro on another. My question
    > deals with drive letter configuations. Both Drives are Western Digitals.
    > Drive 1 is 13.6 G. Drive 2 is 80 G. Drive 2 was partitioned into a pair of
    > 10G drives and one 60G drive (numbers rounded). When I boot up into the
    > different systems, here's what the computer sees. (a: is 3.5 drive for both)
    >
    > Booting up in ME
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: Unused 10G part of Drive 2.
    > E: Unused 60G part of Drive 2.
    > F: CD-ROM
    > G: CD-DVD
    >
    > Booting up in W2K Pro
    > C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    > D: W2K Pro on Drive 1
    > E: Unused 10G part of Drive 2
    > F: Unused 60G part of Drive 2
    > G: CD-ROM
    > H: CD-DVD
    >
    > Drive 2 with W2K Pro is NTFS. Drive 1 with W2K is FAT32. I know ME doesn't
    > recognize NTFS, so I understand why when the system is in ME mode it won't
    > see Drive 2.
    > My concern is having having different drive letters between the two OS. Only
    > C: is common to both drives. All the other drive letters differ depending on
    > the OS i'm using. Will this cause problems down the road? I'm still in the
    > "rebuilding" process for both drives (started over, reformatted drives,
    > installed ME first, installed W2K Pro second) and I've run into a few
    > glitches (browser freezes up trying to go to second page using Explorer 6)
    > but again, I haven't finished all the updates, reloads, ect ... Any help or
    > advice would be greatly appreciated.
    > System:
    > A7V8X-X Motherboard
    > AMD 2200 Athlon CPU
    > 1048 K of Ram (already limited to 512 in ME)
    > Internet via Cable Modem
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    "=?Utf-8?B?c3RhZ2dlcmxlZTIyOA==?="
    <staggerlee228@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    news:AD4C777F-0CCD-4183-AD50-11E276FA908E@microsoft.com:

    > Thanks for the information. In answer to the primary/logical drive
    > question, the 13G drive is all primary. On the 80G, the first 10G is
    > the primary while the other 10G and the 60G parts are logical drives.
    > I'm also using W2K to manage the dual booting. My main reason for the
    > split was to keep my programs and things I use on one complete drive
    > while my kids older programs that won't run on W2K reside elsewhere.
    > My fear at this point is having to rearrange everything after I
    > managed to get both systems working. I think I'll be fine as long as
    > the computer knows what it's doing depending on which system I'm
    > working on. I guess I just want to make sure that any "automatic"
    > function (program installations, for example) will know where it's
    > suppose to go. I've continued working to get both system's back to
    > normal, and so far so good. I still, however, want to be sure I'm not
    > setting myself up for a bigger problem later (reinstalling all the
    > stuff needed for both system ain't fun).
    > Staggerlee
    >
    >
    > "staggerlee228" wrote:
    >
    >> I've just installed ME on one hard drive and W2K Pro on another. My
    >> question deals with drive letter configuations. Both Drives are
    >> Western Digitals. Drive 1 is 13.6 G. Drive 2 is 80 G. Drive 2 was
    >> partitioned into a pair of 10G drives and one 60G drive (numbers
    >> rounded). When I boot up into the different systems, here's what the
    >> computer sees. (a: is 3.5 drive for both)
    >>
    >> Booting up in ME
    >> C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    >> D: Unused 10G part of Drive 2.
    >> E: Unused 60G part of Drive 2.
    >> F: CD-ROM
    >> G: CD-DVD
    >>
    >> Booting up in W2K Pro
    >> C: Win Me on 10G part of Drive 2
    >> D: W2K Pro on Drive 1
    >> E: Unused 10G part of Drive 2
    >> F: Unused 60G part of Drive 2
    >> G: CD-ROM
    >> H: CD-DVD
    >>
    >> Drive 2 with W2K Pro is NTFS. Drive 1 with W2K is FAT32. I know ME
    >> doesn't recognize NTFS, so I understand why when the system is in ME
    >> mode it won't see Drive 2.
    >> My concern is having having different drive letters between the two
    >> OS. Only C: is common to both drives. All the other drive letters
    >> differ depending on the OS i'm using. Will this cause problems down
    >> the road? I'm still in the "rebuilding" process for both drives
    >> (started over, reformatted drives, installed ME first, installed W2K
    >> Pro second) and I've run into a few glitches (browser freezes up
    >> trying to go to second page using Explorer 6) but again, I haven't
    >> finished all the updates, reloads, ect ... Any help or advice would
    >> be greatly appreciated. System:
    >> A7V8X-X Motherboard
    >> AMD 2200 Athlon CPU
    >> 1048 K of Ram (already limited to 512 in ME)
    >> Internet via Cable Modem

    You should not have any problems with the different drive letters. One
    OS does not know about the other OS, same for the programs you install.
    You can always change some of the drive letters in Windows 2000 using
    Disk Administrator but it really isn't necessary.

    Leonard Severt
    Microsoft Enterprise Support

    --
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.file_system (More info?)

    Couple of suggestions since I have learned from my teenagers

    Option 1

    If your bios supports it you can set each drive to boot as the primary
    drive. This would require a reinstall on the 2nd drive so boot and
    registry pointers are correct. This way, booted into the kids boot
    there is nothing that can happen to your drive/OS/config. So if
    booting the 2nd disk the first is set to 'not installed'.

    Option 2

    Partition Magic has a utility called Boot Magic. Once installed you
    can 'hide' the other drive so the kids can't access it. Only weakness
    to this software is if you have them booting the primary drive they can
    trash both boots by messing with c:

    Just some thoughts :-)


    --
    wanderer
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posted via http://www.mcse.ms
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    View this thread: http://www.mcse.ms/message1336039.html
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