Good wireless bridge?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

I want a wireless bridge (is that redundant?) to act as an ethernet
converter, connecting to different brand APs (one at a time, of course).
Would like to buy only 1 bridge and have it work with other brands of APs. An
external antenna connector would be a plus.

I hear good things about D-Link's DWL-900AP+, rev C.

Do you have a favorite? If so, what do you like about it?

Thanks,
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

DaveC
me@privacy.net
This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group
9 answers Last reply
More about good wireless bridge
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    "DaveC" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:0001HW.BE979820007C3EEBF04075B0@news.sonic.net...
    > I want a wireless bridge (is that redundant?) to act as an ethernet
    > converter, connecting to different brand APs (one at a time, of
    course).
    > Would like to buy only 1 bridge and have it work with other brands
    of APs. An
    > external antenna connector would be a plus.
    >
    > I hear good things about D-Link's DWL-900AP+, rev C.
    >
    > Do you have a favorite? If so, what do you like about it?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > --
    > Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
    > ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

    I think what you are looking for is an ethernet bridge or a workgroup
    bridge.
    One that will bridge multiple clients. The Zyxel g-405 is one example.
    They should talk to any AP but there is no guarantee.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    In article <0001HW.BE979820007C3EEBF04075B0@news.sonic.net>,
    DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    :I want a wireless bridge (is that redundant?)

    No, most WiFi equipment these days does not have a briding mode
    [at least not in the shipped versions.] Some of the more stable and
    reliable bridges that have been on the market for years are quite
    restricted as to which systems they will connect to -- sometimes
    only to the exact same model, sometimes only to devices by the same
    manufacturer.

    Wireless bridges that follow a standard and so should interoperate
    [in theory] use 'WDS', "Wireless Distribution Standard". If a device
    you are examining does not advertise WDS, then it isn't the right one
    for you [short of replacing the firmware]; if the devices you want to
    connect to are not WDS, then you might not be able to connect to them
    from anything other than a device made by the same manufacturer.


    :to act as an ethernet
    :converter, connecting to different brand APs (one at a time, of course).
    :Would like to buy only 1 bridge and have it work with other brands of APs. An
    :external antenna connector would be a plus.

    :I hear good things about D-Link's DWL-900AP+, rev C.

    I have no particular models to suggest at the moment, just general
    comments:

    1) Read the reviews in places like pcmag and tomsnetworking and amazon .
    When I was last looking around a few weeks ago, it was quite
    discouraging: the top-rated consumer-level 802.11g devices were
    at 6 out of 10 or less in customer satisfaction. Mass sales is no
    guarantee of quality.

    2) Read the reviews again, and read the informal reports in places
    like alt.internet.wireless and dslreports.com, this time with a view
    to what customers are saying about their support experiences with the
    companies. -My- quick summary, looking at those reports, would be

    "If one of the devices works for you in -your- circumstances, then
    Great! -- but that doesn't mean it will work for everyone. If you
    are having a problem with it, and it is from any of the well-known
    commodity WiFi manufacturers, chances are that you will be
    disenchanted by the support organization, with a significant chance
    that you will end up swearingly up and down that you will never
    EVER buy from that manufacturer again."

    Or to put things another way: If it works for you, then it works
    for you; if it doesn't work for you, then be prepared to throw it
    out (or sell it on eBay). You seldom get serious support attention
    from a WiFi manufacturer unless you have paid several times the
    going commodity-device price.
    --
    History is a pile of debris -- Laurie Anderson
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    In article <42726fa4$0$1909$2c56edd9@news.cablerocket.com>,
    campbell@alliancecable.net (Airhead) writes...
    >
    > "DaveC" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    > news:0001HW.BE979820007C3EEBF04075B0@news.sonic.net...
    > > I want a wireless bridge (is that redundant?) to act as an ethernet
    > > converter, connecting to different brand APs (one at a time, of
    > course).
    > > Would like to buy only 1 bridge and have it work with other brands
    > of APs. An
    > > external antenna connector would be a plus.
    > >
    > > I hear good things about D-Link's DWL-900AP+, rev C.
    > >
    > > Do you have a favorite? If so, what do you like about it?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > --
    > > Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
    > > ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.
    >
    > I think what you are looking for is an ethernet bridge or a workgroup
    > bridge.
    > One that will bridge multiple clients. The Zyxel g-405 is one example.
    > They should talk to any AP but there is no guarantee.


    A WiFi access point is simply an ethernet to WiFi bridge, so I
    assume what the OP wants is just a recommendation for a WiFi AP?

    Since WiFi AP's these days tend to be more expensive than WiFi
    routers, and because (according to Jeff Liebermann) most WiFi
    routers have an undocumented "AP" mode which can be used simply
    by plugging an ethernet cable into the LAN side and leaving the
    WAN side unconnected, you may want to consider that direction
    if price is an issue.


    --
    * Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which *
    * differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are *
    * even incapable of forming such opinions. -- Albert Einstein *
    * *
    * To send email, remove numbers and spaces: pjkusenet64 @ ekahuna27 . com *
    * Simple answers are for simple minds. Try a new way of looking at things. *
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:17:14 -0700, Philip J. Koenig wrote
    (in article <MPG.1cdc6e6719b73f9398a715@corp.supernews.com>):

    > A WiFi access point is simply an ethernet to WiFi bridge, so I
    > assume what the OP wants is just a recommendation for a WiFi AP?

    Terminology (correct me if I'm wrong):
    AP is "point-to-multipoint" device; connects wireless clients to a wired
    network (a WAN, for example).

    Client is "multi-point-to-point" device, connecting wired network (or single
    computer) to the AP, via wireless signal.

    I want to connect a wired subnet to a remote AP (this device already exists
    and cannot be changed or replaced). As I understand it, I can use an AP
    device used in Client mode (talks to APs) or a Bridge (also talks to APs).

    > ...most WiFi
    > routers have an undocumented "AP" mode which can be used simply
    > by plugging an ethernet cable into the LAN side and leaving the
    > WAN side unconnected...

    So a router can be used in Client mode? It can talk to APs?

    Thanks,
    --
    Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
    ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

    DaveC
    me@privacy.net
    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    "DaveC" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:0001HW.BE9875A000B02977F04075B0@news.sonic.net...
    > On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:17:14 -0700, Philip J. Koenig wrote
    > (in article <MPG.1cdc6e6719b73f9398a715@corp.supernews.com>):
    >
    > > A WiFi access point is simply an ethernet to WiFi bridge, so I
    > > assume what the OP wants is just a recommendation for a WiFi AP?
    >
    > Terminology (correct me if I'm wrong):
    > AP is "point-to-multipoint" device; connects wireless clients to a
    wired
    > network (a WAN, for example).
    >
    > Client is "multi-point-to-point" device, connecting wired network
    (or single
    > computer) to the AP, via wireless signal.
    >
    > I want to connect a wired subnet to a remote AP (this device already
    exists
    > and cannot be changed or replaced). As I understand it, I can use an
    AP
    > device used in Client mode (talks to APs) or a Bridge (also talks to
    APs).
    >
    > > ...most WiFi
    > > routers have an undocumented "AP" mode which can be used simply
    > > by plugging an ethernet cable into the LAN side and leaving the
    > > WAN side unconnected...
    >
    > So a router can be used in Client mode? It can talk to APs?

    Only if it supports AP Client Mode otherwise a wireless router AP
    wont talk to another wireless router AP. The other issue is how many
    MACs will an AP client pass.. 1 for sure, note the word client and not
    clients. AP client mode is really acting as a wireless adapter
    converting
    a non-wireless device to wireless. Allot of devices such as myWAP54G
    use WDS and has AP, Bridge, Repeater and Client mode.
    Repeater mode and Client mode will talk to an AP, Bridge mode
    talks to another bridge.


    >
    > Thanks,
    > --
    > Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
    > ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.
    >
    > DaveC
    > me@privacy.net
    > This is an invalid return address
    > Please reply in the news group
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    Philip J. Koenig wrote:

    > A WiFi access point is simply an ethernet to WiFi bridge, so I
    > assume what the OP wants is just a recommendation for a WiFi AP?
    >
    > Since WiFi AP's these days tend to be more expensive than WiFi
    > routers, and because (according to Jeff Liebermann) most WiFi
    > routers have an undocumented "AP" mode which can be used simply
    > by plugging an ethernet cable into the LAN side and leaving the
    > WAN side unconnected, you may want to consider that direction
    > if price is an issue.
    >
    >

    What I did, was connect a Wifi router to a 3rd NIC on my Linux firewall.
    This way, Wifi is outside my firewall and the only way in, is via ssh or
    VPN. I also have WEP enabled.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    Airhead wrote:

    >> So a router can be used in Client mode? It can talk to APs?
    >
    > Only if it supports AP Client Mode otherwise a wireless router AP
    > wont talk to another wireless router AP. The other issue is how many
    > MACs will an AP client pass.. 1 for sure, note the word client and not
    > clients. AP client mode is really acting as a wireless adapter
    > converting
    > a non-wireless device to wireless. Allot of devices such as myWAP54G
    > use WDS and has AP, Bridge, Repeater and Client mode.
    > Repeater mode and Client mode will talk to an AP, Bridge mode
    > talks to another bridge.

    FWIW, there are some Linksys models than run on Linux and can be configured
    to do things far beyond what the designers intended. There is even one
    package available, that's essentially a "hot spot in a box", for use in a
    coffee shop etc.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 05:25:03 -0700, Airhead wrote
    (in article <427378f3$0$1908$2c56edd9@news.cablerocket.com>):

    > Repeater mode and Client mode will talk to an AP, Bridge mode talks to
    > another bridge.

    Thanks for that. Now that I've got the terminology down, I'm looking for a
    device (regardless of what it's called) that can operate in client mode.
    Since I the existing remote AP cannot be changed, bridge mode it out of the
    question.

    I like a lot of the D-Link devices, many of which operate in client mode.

    Thanks again,
    --
    Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
    ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

    DaveC
    me@privacy.net
    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,ba.internet (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:17:14 -0700, Philip J. Koenig
    <See_email_@ddress_below.This_one_is.invalid> wrote:

    >
    >Since WiFi AP's these days tend to be more expensive than WiFi
    >routers, and because (according to Jeff Liebermann) most WiFi
    >routers have an undocumented "AP" mode which can be used simply
    >by plugging an ethernet cable into the LAN side and leaving the
    >WAN side unconnected, you may want to consider that direction
    >if price is an issue.

    Most routers do NOT support client mode, however, which is needed for the
    far end of a bridge, at least not without doing custom linux firmware
    hacking or whatever.
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