epson r300 colour accuracy

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The strong blacks in my picture have a strong green cast. I tried printing
in with both the epson printing software and via photoshop cs. When
printing a colour picture are the blacks produced using the black cartridge
or is it the combo of colours?
13 answers Last reply
More about epson r300 colour accuracy
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Are you using Epson paper? Are you turning color management off in the
    printer driver?


    "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    news:e4mNe.1105$5m3.726@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > The strong blacks in my picture have a strong green cast. I tried
    > printing in with both the epson printing software and via photoshop cs.
    > When printing a colour picture are the blacks produced using the black
    > cartridge or is it the combo of colours?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    news:e4mNe.1105$5m3.726@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > The strong blacks in my picture have a strong green cast. I tried
    > printing in with both the epson printing software and via photoshop cs.
    > When printing a colour picture are the blacks produced using the black
    > cartridge or is it the combo of colours?
    >
    If the conversion of RGB to CMYK results in only data in the K channel, then
    the printer will only use the black cartridge. This is far from the usual
    case.
    However, most of the time, the conversion of RGB to CMYK results in some
    data in the C, M, and Y channels and significant data in the K channel.
    Hence when printed, you will usually see some kind of cast.

    The solution is to alter the color content of the strong blacks. You will
    usually find that the R, G, and B values are not identical in the instance
    you cited.

    If, however, you are printing a B & W image, just tell the printer driver to
    use only black. You could also convert it to B & W in photoshop.
    Jim
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    It is not clear if you are describing blacks in color images or blacks in
    b&w images.
    The apparent color cast is also affected by the ambient light with which you
    view the print and the angle with which you view the print.
    The paper surface finish can also be a factor.
    If you do not already do so calibrating your monitor with an external device
    may help. LCD panels do not really produce deep blacks and most CRTs, while
    better, also do not really have as black a black as they are supposed to. It
    is possible that, even if using color management, your eyes' concept of
    monitor black and photoshop/epson printer driver vision of black are very
    different.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Jim" <j.n@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:DWmNe.3297$Z%6.2836@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    > "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    > news:e4mNe.1105$5m3.726@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >> The strong blacks in my picture have a strong green cast. I tried
    >> printing in with both the epson printing software and via photoshop cs.
    >> When printing a colour picture are the blacks produced using the black
    >> cartridge or is it the combo of colours?
    >>
    > If the conversion of RGB to CMYK results in only data in the K channel,
    > then the printer will only use the black cartridge. This is far from the
    > usual case.
    > However, most of the time, the conversion of RGB to CMYK results in some
    > data in the C, M, and Y channels and significant data in the K channel.
    > Hence when printed, you will usually see some kind of cast.
    >
    > The solution is to alter the color content of the strong blacks. You will
    > usually find that the R, G, and B values are not identical in the instance
    > you cited.
    >
    > If, however, you are printing a B & W image, just tell the printer driver
    > to use only black. You could also convert it to B & W in photoshop.
    > Jim

    i'm printing a black cat. i have since printed a creme wedding cake. On
    screen the creme is quite strong. on printout from using my old canon the
    creme is more delicate. Fortunately that is closer to the true colour. an
    epson print has a slight greeny yellow to it. the white wall in the
    background has a green cast, Its not much but i'm getting good at this and
    noticed it immeditely.

    As for my settings they are as follows
    show more options is ticked.
    i have selected colour management.

    source space
    document srgbiec61966-2.1

    print space
    profile printer color management

    inside the epson driver
    best photo
    premium glossy photopaper

    advanced box
    highspeed is unticked

    colour management is set to icm

    no colour adjustment is not ticked.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "birdman" <apquilts@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:UcnNe.1093$3F6.1087@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    > It is not clear if you are describing blacks in color images or blacks in
    > b&w images.
    > The apparent color cast is also affected by the ambient light with which
    > you view the print and the angle with which you view the print.
    > The paper surface finish can also be a factor.
    > If you do not already do so calibrating your monitor with an external
    > device may help. LCD panels do not really produce deep blacks and most
    > CRTs, while better, also do not really have as black a black as they are
    > supposed to. It is possible that, even if using color management, your
    > eyes' concept of monitor black and photoshop/epson printer driver vision
    > of black are very different.

    I am viewing using natural light. I am printing colour photos. using my
    canon printer I have a very close match.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    news:zvpNe.1782$5m3.1470@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    > "birdman" <apquilts@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    > news:UcnNe.1093$3F6.1087@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >> It is not clear if you are describing blacks in color images or blacks in
    >> b&w images.
    >> The apparent color cast is also affected by the ambient light with which
    >> you view the print and the angle with which you view the print.
    >> The paper surface finish can also be a factor.
    >> If you do not already do so calibrating your monitor with an external
    >> device may help. LCD panels do not really produce deep blacks and most
    >> CRTs, while better, also do not really have as black a black as they are
    >> supposed to. It is possible that, even if using color management, your
    >> eyes' concept of monitor black and photoshop/epson printer driver vision
    >> of black are very different.
    >
    > I am viewing using natural light. I am printing colour photos. using my
    > canon printer I have a very close match.

    I have tried using epson standard gamma 1.8. Everything was incredibly
    green and incredibly dark. icm with no cokour adjustment checked is too dark
    and very green.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On 19-Aug-2005, "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote:

    > >> It is not clear if you are describing blacks in color images or blacks in
    > >> b&w images.
    > >> The apparent color cast is also affected by the ambient light with which
    > >> you view the print and the angle with which you view the print.
    > >> The paper surface finish can also be a factor.

    Dan Margulis in his Photoshop, correcting images bible, Professional
    Photoshop, covers colour casts in depth.
    Blacks come in many shades, blue/black, green/black, red/black
    and you can see this using the eyedropper on the blacks. Each
    value for the primaries should be the same, likewise for the whites.
    I often have to remove such casts from .jpg camera files that
    clients send for web pages.
    If you are lucky you can find a neutral white and black somewhere
    in the image. Margulis cites vehicle tyres as black (being mostly
    carbon black), road sign backgrounds for white. I sometimes have
    to use a power socket or a piece of litter someone has dropped.
    Shadows and specular highlights are not suitable.
    As mentioned above ambient light is the main problem, outdoors
    grass casts a green cast by reflection, some windows of offices
    are tinted, artificial light a big source of casts, whatever the source.
    Digi cameras can also have white balance errors.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    news:BknNe.7102$Il.7090@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    > "Jim" <j.n@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:DWmNe.3297$Z%6.2836@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
    >>
    >> "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    >> news:e4mNe.1105$5m3.726@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >>> The strong blacks in my picture have a strong green cast. I tried
    >>> printing in with both the epson printing software and via photoshop cs.
    >>> When printing a colour picture are the blacks produced using the black
    >>> cartridge or is it the combo of colours?
    >>>
    >>>>SNIPPED>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
    >
    > As for my settings they are as follows
    > show more options is ticked.
    > i have selected colour management.
    >
    > source space
    > document srgbiec61966-2.1
    >
    > print space
    > profile printer color management
    >
    > inside the epson driver
    > best photo
    > premium glossy photopaper
    >
    > advanced box
    > highspeed is unticked
    >
    > colour management is set to icm
    >
    > no colour adjustment is not ticked.
    >
    Can't have you failing to get True Blacks.

    I presume you are using Epson Inks, otherwise the Epson Profiles will not be
    accurate, and that you have also Calibrated your monitor.

    Having read your workflow, you seem to be Colour Managing twice. Once in
    Photoshop and once again in the Epson Driver. This will produce incorect
    colours.

    "Print Space --- Profile printer colour management". This should be the
    Printer / Paper profile for the paper you are using. (something like Epson
    Premium glossy R300)


    "Colour Management is set to ICM" The choice in this section should be No
    Colour Management.

    This might work a bit better.

    Roy G
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:_zuNe.12073$wh6.8577@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
    >> As for my settings they are as follows
    >> show more options is ticked.
    >> i have selected colour management.
    >>
    >> source space
    >> document srgbiec61966-2.1
    >>
    >> print space
    >> profile printer color management
    >>
    >> inside the epson driver
    >> best photo
    >> premium glossy photopaper
    >>
    >> advanced box
    >> highspeed is unticked
    >>
    >> colour management is set to icm
    >>
    >> no colour adjustment is not ticked.
    >>
    > Can't have you failing to get True Blacks.
    >
    > I presume you are using Epson Inks, otherwise the Epson Profiles will not
    > be accurate, and that you have also Calibrated your monitor.
    >
    > Having read your workflow, you seem to be Colour Managing twice. Once in
    > Photoshop and once again in the Epson Driver. This will produce incorect
    > colours.
    >
    > "Print Space --- Profile printer colour management". This should be the
    > Printer / Paper profile for the paper you are using. (something like Epson
    > Premium glossy R300)
    >
    >
    > "Colour Management is set to ICM" The choice in this section should be
    > No Colour Management.
    >
    > This might work a bit better.

    Best result thus far is to download picture to cf card. Then place in
    reader slot. select print enhancement to none.

    Setting colour management to none resulted in an incredibly dark print that
    was very dark green. I also tried photoenhance but it seemed to crank up
    the brightness to the point almost all detail was lost, it also seemed to
    oversharpen. The picture was very 'noisy' too.

    With photoshop changing printer colour management to the specific r300/310
    driver seems to have done the job.

    As for monitor calibration it is set to default srgb. That was more than
    adequate for my canon. I also used the auto calibrate of my dedicated dvd
    card. I have checked online sites that have ever increasing squares of
    black. Things were very close to my canon. Colour balance was neutral but
    brightness on the monitor was slightly higher than

    No i am not using the epson carts. I was advised that epson warranty is
    invalid with compats so i was told to leave originals in box and use compats
    from the getgo. Should i need to return then i would simply insert the
    original carts.

    Thanks for all the info so far.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Jim" <j.n@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:DWmNe.3297$Z%6.2836@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...

    > However, most of the time, the conversion of RGB to CMYK results in some
    > data in the C, M, and Y channels and significant data in the K channel.
    > Hence when printed, you will usually see some kind of cast.
    >
    > The solution is to alter the color content of the strong blacks. You will
    > usually find that the R, G, and B values are not identical in the instance
    > you cited.

    The green parts are where the cat has a white sheen on very black areas.

    using the eye dropper i get
    R=56
    G=60
    B=62

    Elsewhere the white bits of the cat are white. As i have exposed for the
    cat the surrounding pavement is almost washed out. There is no cast there.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:_zuNe.12073$wh6.8577@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
    >> As for my settings they are as follows
    >> show more options is ticked.
    >> i have selected colour management.
    >>
    >> source space
    >> document srgbiec61966-2.1
    >>
    >> print space
    >> profile printer color management
    >>
    >> inside the epson driver
    >> best photo
    >> premium glossy photopaper
    >>
    >> advanced box
    >> highspeed is unticked
    >>
    >> colour management is set to icm
    >>
    >> no colour adjustment is not ticked.
    >>
    > Can't have you failing to get True Blacks.
    >
    > I presume you are using Epson Inks, otherwise the Epson Profiles will not
    > be accurate, and that you have also Calibrated your monitor.
    >
    > Having read your workflow, you seem to be Colour Managing twice. Once in
    > Photoshop and once again in the Epson Driver. This will produce incorect
    > colours.
    >
    > "Print Space --- Profile printer colour management". This should be the
    > Printer / Paper profile for the paper you are using. (something like Epson
    > Premium glossy R300)
    >
    >
    > "Colour Management is set to ICM" The choice in this section should be
    > No Colour Management.
    >
    > This might work a bit better.

    My monitor itself has been set to 6500K for image mangement.

    I also have "original panel colour"
    9300K for cad/cam
    sRGB preset
    user preset.

    Also to rule out the colour calibration i selected 'auto colour' The print
    result now matches the canon picture.

    To rule out erroneous driver or photoshop settings i saved to a cf card and
    printed from the buiilt in card reader. The cat still has green but it
    isn't pronounced. Also bright sunlight shows up green more than shaded.
    Also if there is alot of reflected light going through the paper the green
    is more pronounced. The cat has white poors and whiskas and they are white.
    As i exposed for a black cat the surrounding are washed out. The delicately
    coloured paving stone matches the screen. So basically if ther is a green
    black my monitor isn't displaying it.

    using the eye dropper
    R=59
    G=60
    B=66
    I think it is reasonable to assume that somewhere in the driver the canon
    software has its own version of 'auto colour'. Most reviews say canon is
    better out of the box but those who know how to calibrate will get a final
    better image with epson.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    news:CNzNe.8792$Il.5183@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    [..]
    > No i am not using the epson carts.

    That's likely to be 90% of your problem.

    All the 3rd party inks for my R200 I've used so far suffer from a tendency
    towards green on the mid/dark greys.

    Using a paper ICM profile gets rid of it to a large extent, but on black and
    white images its still noticeable in daylight.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Anna Daptor wrote:

    >"ian lincoln" <jessops@sux.com> wrote in message
    >news:CNzNe.8792$Il.5183@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    >
    >[..]
    >
    >
    >>No i am not using the epson carts.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >That's likely to be 90% of your problem.
    >
    >

    YEP AFTERMARKET GARBAGE

    >All the 3rd party inks for my R200 I've used so far suffer from a tendency
    >towards green on the mid/dark greys.
    >
    >Using a paper ICM profile gets rid of it to a large extent, but on black and
    >white images its still noticeable in daylight.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
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