Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Core 2 Duo E6600 configuration?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
September 8, 2006 1:40:19 PM

I've just finished assembling my new Core 2 Duo PC, installed windows etc. Do I need to configure the CPU at all?
Also, on booting it says that the frequency is 1600MHz. Is this correct?
Cheers
September 8, 2006 6:38:10 PM

No, you don't need to configure the cpu. You can adjust its voltage and the bus frequency, but you don't need to.

And what are you looking at that's giving you frequency? The frequency of what?
September 8, 2006 7:15:43 PM

Quote:
I've just finished assembling my new Core 2 Duo PC, installed windows etc. Do I need to configure the CPU at all?
Also, on booting it says that the frequency is 1600MHz. Is this correct?
Cheers


what core 2 duo do you have?

and where are you getting this reading from?

most likely this is your cpu while in idle and therefore it has underclocked itself to save power consumption...
Related resources
September 8, 2006 8:45:22 PM

I suppose that its the frequency of the CPU.
Ahh its on the startup screen, just below where it states the model and speed of the cpu?
September 8, 2006 8:53:57 PM

Quote:
I've just finished assembling my new Core 2 Duo PC, installed windows etc. Do I need to configure the CPU at all?
Also, on booting it says that the frequency is 1600MHz. Is this correct?
Cheers


1.6GHz is not correct for an E6600.

You might have to check the frequency or FSB of your mobo. It might be set wrong; I am suspecting too low. I don't have a Core 2 to compare with, but my 840EE was reading 2.6GHz, and I had to adjust the FSB from AUTO to manual to get it to read 3.2GHz @ 200FSB, I believe.

I would double check it, since the E6600 should be reading 2.4GHz.
September 9, 2006 2:12:11 AM

In the BIOS setup under the advanced tab, it states:

Brand String: Intel Core 2 CPU 6600 @ 2.40GHz
Frequency: 1600MHz
FSB Speed: 1066MHz
Ratio Actual Value: 9

That doesn't seem right? How can I change this?
I'm using an ASUS P5W DH Deluxe mobo, btw.
This is my first time building a PC, so I'm a bit lost..
September 9, 2006 2:23:44 AM

It sounds as if your processor may be underclocking itself when idle. I would try running something very CPU intensive, and observe the clock speed while your E6600 is under load. If your CPU is underclocking itself, then it should ramp right up to 2.4GHz when it is stresses.

If this is the case, there are two technologies that I'm guessing are responsible:
Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology (EIST)
Enhanced Halt State (C1E)

I don't own a CPU with a power-saving feature of any sort, so I am unfamiliar with these technologies. If these are the problem, someone else will have to tell you how to disable them.

I hope I helped...
September 9, 2006 2:36:45 AM

Well I semi-understand what you're talkinga bout, so its definately a help :D 
I've been monitoring the Asus AI booster program, which is an overclocking utility, and the clockspeed is jumping around between 1600MHz to the correct 2400MHz - Ill bet thats consistent with what the power-saving thing does?
September 9, 2006 2:40:18 AM

It also says my CPU is sitting around 64 degrees C. Is this too high?
September 9, 2006 2:54:28 AM

Quote:
In the BIOS setup under the advanced tab, it states:

Brand String: Intel Core 2 CPU 6600 @ 2.40GHz
Frequency: 1600MHz
FSB Speed: 1066MHz
Ratio Actual Value: 9

That doesn't seem right? How can I change this?
I'm using an ASUS P5W DH Deluxe mobo, btw.
This is my first time building a PC, so I'm a bit lost..


Check your multiplier. It might be set to low. I am not sure what the multiplier for an E6600 is suppose to be, but it can give you a lower reading on your CPU.

What does your computer properties show the CPU as? 1.6GHz or 2.4GHz?
September 9, 2006 2:57:24 AM

System properties show the CPU as 2.4.
Is that "Ratio Actual Value: 9" what you mean?
The multiplier on the OC utility = 9.

Also is 65 degrees C not a problem?
September 9, 2006 2:57:55 AM

Here's a guide I found on enabling/disabling EIST. You might as well try it:
http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/asmo-na/eng/products/desktop/platform/viiv/integrate/tech_briefing/eist/203838.htm

http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sspec=sl9s8
This is the data on your E6600. It shows that your CPU supports EIST and the Enhanced halt state that may be causing your clock discrepencies. However, the reason I posted it is to comment on your temperature: The thermal specification for your CPU is 60.1C. The urgency of that reading depends on whether the processor was either idling/loaded and operating at the correct clock. If that is the idle temp, you need to get that under control.

================

@NMDante: I believe the normal multiplier for the E6600 is 9x, and the multiplier used for SpeedStep is 6x. mpohagan, try running CPU-Z to determine your CPU multiplier. http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php
September 9, 2006 2:59:09 AM

what is the quickest/best way to get the temperature under control?
I'm using the heatsink and fan that came with the CPU
September 9, 2006 3:03:44 AM

Sorry buddy, but coolers were never my specialty. You might look into getting an aftermarket cooler for your CPU. At the very least, people will suggest that you change your thermal material. When you opened the stock heatsink, was there a thermal pad on the bottom of the heatsink or was there a paste that you had to apply?

Either way, most will suggest that you change your transfer material to Artic Silver 5, or another similar high-performance material. You could also try adding fans to your chassis, and rewiring the chassis - a messy wiring job can impede airflow.
September 9, 2006 3:06:46 AM

There was a thermal pad on the base of the heatsink. Do you know if there should be any movement on the heatsink when fastened? Its slightly loose, I was thinking that maybe there might not be enough contact between heatsink and the cpu.
September 9, 2006 3:09:20 AM

That temperature was sitting constant regardless of idling or load, too. Rather worried.
September 9, 2006 3:10:00 AM

When you installed the HSF, did it click totally in place.

Intel's stock cooler has been notorious in not being installed completely correct, due to it's crappy push-pin design. Some people have even freaked out when installing the stock cooler, since it sounded like it cracked the mobo when the pins were pushed completely in.

*edit*

But DO NOT go crazy and put too much force when pushing in those pins. It could be bad.
September 9, 2006 3:11:16 AM

It didn't feel like it did, its slightly loose. A bit scared about forcing it, but I'll have a look and try and seat it properly
September 9, 2006 3:13:23 AM

If you have to, remove the motherboard, and push the pins that way.

Yes, it's a pain, but pushing on the motherboard while it's on those motherboard standoffs can cause cracks if you're not careful.

I haven't used an Intel stock cooler in years, but so far, I have heard nothing but problems when they aren't installed correctly.
September 9, 2006 3:16:24 AM

any recommendations for a cooler to buy, then?
September 9, 2006 3:23:56 AM

Wow. Uh...this might take me a bit to research, since I water cool, mostly.

The Artic Cooling Freezer7 linkie has good reviews.

The other Artic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro linkie is also good.

Zalman's CNPS9500 linkie is a good choice, too.

Of course, you're gonna want some good thermal paste:
Artic Silver 5 linkie or Zalman ZM -STG1 linkie are both good products. I haven't personally used the Zalman brand thermal paste, but you can't go wrong with AS5.
September 9, 2006 3:34:07 AM

I reseated the heatsink, and now the cpu temperature is steady at 31 degrees C :)  thanks guys.
Do you think its worthwhile upgrading from the stock cooler and thermal paste anyway?
cheers
September 9, 2006 3:37:48 AM

Not really, unless you plan to overclock.

The stock cooler will actually do a decent job at stock voltages.
September 9, 2006 3:39:31 AM

ok cool :)  thankyou for that!
Now I wonder if when I reboot it'll still show frequency at 1600, even though the OC utility shows it at 2400? hmm.
!