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Industrial Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Switch by GarrettCom,..

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Anonymous
May 31, 2005 8:02:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

FIRST INDUSTRIAL POWER OVER ETHERNET SWITCH ADDRESSES
CHICKEN/EGG QUESTION, OPENS MARKET FOR PoE APPLICATIONS

Implementation Costs for Devices such as Surveillance Cameras
and Remote IP Phones Can Be Reduced - Even in Hostile Environments
- Using PS14P PoE Switch

GarrettCom™, Inc., is bringing the flexibility and cost-savings
benefits of Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) to industrial applications with
the introduction of its four-port Magnum™ PS14P PoE Power Source
Convenient Switch. The hardened PS14P switch is the first
industrial-spec switch to offer an IEEE 802.3af standards-compliant way
to power and connect small devices such as IP phones, surveillance
cameras, wireless access points and industrial sensors at the remote
edges of an industrial network. The PS14P switch is premium-rated for
temperature-uncontrolled environments with a temperature rating of
-40°C to 75°C, and resists dirt, moisture, and other threats from
hostile industrial environments.
Originally developed to provide an inexpensive power source for VoIP
phones being deployed in enterprises, PoE (IEEE 802.3af), enables Power
Sourcing Equipment (PSE) to provide power over standard twisted-pair
Ethernet cabling to a compliant Powered Device (PD). PDs use PoE
standard protocols to - and utilize - power transmitted over the
data link. In effect, PoE provides a standards-based way to provide
power to a wide variety of PDs in areas where it is physically or
financially prohibitive to offer normal power.

Many Enterprise Ethernet applications are utilizing a device called a
"Midspan Power Source" to "inject" power into an existing
network. This box sits between an existing Ethernet switch and the
target PDs. By integrating Ethernet switching, PoE power sourcing, and
industrial-hardened components and packaging into a single unit,
GarrettCom's Magnum PS14P PoE Power Source Convenient Switch saves
costs and space, and increases reliability in a wide spectrum of
industrial applications. As more new industrial PoE devices arrive in
the market, the Magnum PS14P Switch will also enable new applications,
extending Ethernet LANs further into high-availability industrial
systems.

GarrettCom is at the forefront of bringing this much-needed technology
to the industrial environment," said Norman Pearl, VP of Engineering,
Dataradio Inc., Montreal, Quebec. We plan on deploying the PS14P
switches with our spread-spectrum, license-free HiPR900 radio system
that is used in SCADA and telemetry industrial applications.
GarrettCom's PoE implementation gives us plug-and-play solutions with
minimal complexity, while the small package makes it ideal for remote
substations, and other locations with limited available real estate.

The Magnum PS14P Switch has four PoE-enabled RJ-45 ports that can drive
802.3af-compliant PDs as well as deliver 10/100 Mb data transmission
over the same twisted-pair cable. The PS14P switches have an
auto-sensing algorithm that cuts off power when 802.3af-compliant
devices are not attached.Proprietary PoE and non-PoE equipment are not
recognized, which protects them from possible damage. The PS14P switch
supports the Power-over-Ethernet PSE standard for over-current
protection, under-current detection, and fault protection.

Built to Take the Heat

The Magnum PS14P Switch, about the size of a deck of playing cards, is
only 3.5 in x 3.0 in. x 1.0 in. ( (8.9 cm x 7.6 cm x 2.5 cm), and
weighs 5.2 oz. (150 g).Its four PoE RJ-45 ports can be supplemented by
connecting the switch to a Magnum CS14P Converter Switch™ device or a
Magnum ES42P Edge Switch to obtain fiber connectivity or additional
non-PoE hardened Ethernet ports.

The PS14P models are built with premium-grade extended temperature
components to be suitable for use in sheltered outdoor locations. It
uses GarrettCom's patent-pending thermal techniques and is equipped
with a robust metal case for durability. Mounting options include
stand-alone panel-mounting, DIN-rail, or rack-mount tray. No internal
air flow is required for cooling, so the PS14P resists dust, dirt,
moisture, smoke and insects.The Magnum PS14P PoE Power Source
Convenient Switch and all other Magnum products are designed and
manufactured in the USA and backed by a three-year warranty.

About GarrettCom

GarrettCom, Inc., Fremont , Calif. , is recognized for its innovation
in the design of industrial, power utility, intelligent transportation
systems and telecommunications markets. For more information on
GarrettCom and its Magnum line of Ethernet products, visit
www.GarrettCom.com, or contact the company at 213 Hammond Ave.,
Fremont, CA 95439, USA, voice 510-438-9071, fax 510-438-9072, email
mktg@garrettcom.com.

More information can be found at: http://garrettcom.com/ps14p.htm

###
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 12:30:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> wrote:
>GarrettCom™, Inc., is bringing the flexibility and cost-savings
>benefits of Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)

Which brings up a nagging question:

How can Linksys build POE gear, including 802.11af power injectors and
5V or 12V endpoint power extractors, for under $50 a pair, while
everyone else's POE gear is on the order of $100/port for just the
injector (10/100 switch ports are essentially free to a first
approximation in this case, IMHO).
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:23:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

William P. N. Smith wrote:

> "GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> wrote:
>>GarrettCom™, Inc., is bringing the flexibility and cost-savings
>>benefits of Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
>
> Which brings up a nagging question:
>
> How can Linksys build POE gear, including 802.11af power injectors and
> 5V or 12V endpoint power extractors, for under $50 a pair, while
> everyone else's POE gear is on the order of $100/port for just the
> injector (10/100 switch ports are essentially free to a first
> approximation in this case, IMHO).

Perhaps you should be asking why everyone else is $100 per port. Maybe
there's no justification for that price. This sort of thing has been
happening for years. Initially the price is high, but someone then drives
it down. This might be one such instance.
Related resources
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 7:57:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Magnum products from GarrettCom are hardened for industrial and outdoor
applications such as video surveillance. The PS14P PoE Switch is a
specialty item for stressful applications, not a commodity product.

For more information, please visit www.GarrettCom.com/ps14p.htm


William wrote:
> "GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> wrote:
> >GarrettCom™, Inc., is bringing the flexibility and cost-savings
> >benefits of Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
>
> Which brings up a nagging question:
>
> How can Linksys build POE gear, including 802.11af power injectors and
> 5V or 12V endpoint power extractors, for under $50 a pair, while
> everyone else's POE gear is on the order of $100/port for just the
> injector (10/100 switch ports are essentially free to a first
> approximation in this case, IMHO).
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 7:58:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Magnum products from GarrettCom are hardened for industrial and outdoor
applications such as video surveillance. The PS14P PoE Switch is a
specialty item for stressful applications, not a commodity product.

For more information, please visit www.GarrettCom.com/ps14p.htm


William wrote:
> "GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> wrote:
> >GarrettCom™, Inc., is bringing the flexibility and cost-savings
> >benefits of Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
>
> Which brings up a nagging question:
>
> How can Linksys build POE gear, including 802.11af power injectors and
> 5V or 12V endpoint power extractors, for under $50 a pair, while
> everyone else's POE gear is on the order of $100/port for just the
> injector (10/100 switch ports are essentially free to a first
> approximation in this case, IMHO).
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 8:59:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

James Knott wrote:

> Perhaps you should be asking why everyone else is $100 per port. Maybe
> there's no justification for that price. This sort of thing has been
> happening for years. Initially the price is high, but someone then
> drives
> it down. This might be one such instance.

I agree with you. PoE is a hot technology, and everybody is trying to reap
the most profits while they can. In terms of design, circuitry, amount of
ICs and overall complexity a PoE-enables Ethernet switch is only
marginally higher than a regular one. If you are able to buy a 5-port
Ethernet switch for $30 today, I do not see why you wouldn’t be able to
buy a PoE-enabled 5-port switch for $50 as soon as the market saturates
enough.

Cheers!






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Anonymous
June 8, 2005 10:08:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

rcdd_at_teledatasystems_dot_com@foo.com (telecom-gear.com) wrote:
>In terms of design, circuitry, amount of
>ICs and overall complexity a PoE-enables Ethernet switch is only
>marginally higher than a regular one.

My point exactly. There _is_ about $15 worth of additional power
supply, so I'd happily pay $20-$25 per port extra, but $100/port is
way too much.

I just bought the last of http://www.phihong.com/html/psa-16u.html
from
https://www.alliedelec.com/cart/ProductDetail.asp?SKU=6...
for $26.46, though I haven't had a chance to try it out yet. I've
also got a couple of the Linksys 5V and 12V kits, so as soon as my
Round Tuit arrives I can start fiddling... 8*)

Now if Phihong would make an 8-port version for $150...
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 11:39:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

telecom-gear.com wrote:

(snip)

> I agree with you. PoE is a hot technology, and everybody is trying to reap
> the most profits while they can. In terms of design, circuitry, amount of
> ICs and overall complexity a PoE-enables Ethernet switch is only
> marginally higher than a regular one. If you are able to buy a 5-port
> Ethernet switch for $30 today, I do not see why you wouldn’t be able to
> buy a PoE-enabled 5-port switch for $50 as soon as the market saturates
> enough.

I now have a five port gigabit switch I got at Fry's on sale for $30.

No PoE, though. It has to get popular enough to make the economy
of scale work, and I don't believe that is true yet.

How much extra should the actual power supply cost?

-- glen
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 9:13:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:
>How much extra should the actual power supply cost?

Somewhere on the order of a buck a watt, or $15 for the power supply,
and another few dollars for the PoE chipset, IMNSHO.
June 10, 2005 2:07:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

<William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
news:t6cha1p9aoosupfde5b2ls51gcefi4kqtj@4ax.com...
> glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:
> >How much extra should the actual power supply cost?
>
> Somewhere on the order of a buck a watt, or $15 for the power supply,
> and another few dollars for the PoE chipset, IMNSHO.

isnt PoE 15 watts per port?

so $75 on your 5 port switch
>
--
Regards

Stephen Hope - return address needs fewer xxs
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 2:07:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"stephen" <stephen_hope.xx@ntlxworld.com> wrote:
><William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
>> glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:
>> >How much extra should the actual power supply cost?

>> Somewhere on the order of a buck a watt, or $15 for the power supply,
>> and another few dollars for the PoE chipset, IMNSHO.

>isnt PoE 15 watts per port?

Yes, sorry, my numbers were 'per port'.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 3:43:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> writes:

> Magnum products from GarrettCom are hardened for industrial and
> outdoor applications such as video surveillance. The PS14P PoE
> Switch is a specialty item for stressful applications, not a
> commodity product.

Hardened in what way?

> For more information, please visit www. [ snip ]

Why? If you're going to spam this newsgroup you should answer in it.

--
David Magda <dmagda at ee.ryerson.ca>
Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under
the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well
under the new. -- Niccolo Machiavelli, _The Prince_, Chapter VI
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 8:14:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

David Magda wrote:

> Hardened in what way?

They can withstand a direct hit from a thermo-nuclear weapon. ;-)
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 12:48:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

David Magda <dmagda+trace050401@ee.ryerson.ca> wrote:
>"GarrettCom" <mktg@garrettcom.com> writes:
>> Magnum products from GarrettCom are hardened for industrial and
>> outdoor applications such as video surveillance. The PS14P PoE
>> Switch is a specialty item for stressful applications, not a
>> commodity product.

>Hardened in what way?

To be fair:

/*
The PS14P switch is premium-rated for temperature-uncontrolled
environments with a temperature rating of –40°C to 75°C, and resists
dirt, moisture, and other threats from hostile industrial
environments.
[...]
The PS14P models are built with premium-grade extended temperature
components to be suitable for use in sheltered outdoor locations. It
uses GarrettCom’s patent-pending thermal techniques and is equipped
with a robust metal case for durability. [...] No internal air flow is
required for cooling, so the PS14P resists dust, dirt, moisture, smoke
and insects. [...] three-year warranty.
*/

Not everyone needs 'industrial strength' PoE solutions, so it's an
interesting product to a small subset of the market.

It's not clear if it comes with a power supply, though, which could
add a few bucks.
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 8:45:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

William P. N. Smith wrote:

> rcdd_at_teledatasystems_dot_com@foo.com (telecom-gear.com) wrote:
>>In terms of design, circuitry, amount of
>>ICs and overall complexity a PoE-enables Ethernet switch is only
>>marginally higher than a regular one.
>
> My point exactly. There _is_ about $15 worth of additional power
> supply, so I'd happily pay $20-$25 per port extra, but $100/port is
> way too much.

Why would the power supply cost $1/watt? PC power supplies typically go
around 20 cents a watt or so, with multiple output voltages.

> I just bought the last of http://www.phihong.com/html/psa-16u.html
> from
>
https://www.alliedelec.com/cart/ProductDetail.asp?SKU=6...
> for $26.46, though I haven't had a chance to try it out yet. I've
> also got a couple of the Linksys 5V and 12V kits, so as soon as my
> Round Tuit arrives I can start fiddling... 8*)
>
> Now if Phihong would make an 8-port version for $150...

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 5:34:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote:
>Why would the power supply cost $1/watt? PC power supplies typically go
>around 20 cents a watt or so, with multiple output voltages.

Because it's not a PC supply made in the bazillions, but a (somewhat
custom) 48V supply made for a specific purpose, with far less volume
and (as of now) very little competition. When PoE gets popular and
everyone has dozens of PoE peripherals in their house, it'll be a lot
less, but at this point, random power supplies (and other power
electronics, like inverters, battery chargers, solar grid-tie boxes,
etc) are on the order of a buck a watt.
!