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Athlon 3400 Very Bad Heat Issues, Please Help!

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September 8, 2006 8:18:32 PM

Hi, I've very recently brought a new system, it uses an Athlon 3400 (Venice), and an Akasa 860 HSF. Its in a Packard Bell case, with a 550W twin fan PSU. Its having some pretty bad heat problems, I was wondering if any of you guys might be able to help me idenitfy the cause of the problem. The temps are:

Idle: 47C
Gaming: 62C

The HSF is fitted okay (as far as I know), and I applied thermal paste to the base of it. Cool'n'quiet, and bios controlled fan speed are enabled, at idle the fan is pretty quiet, and in games it gets a bit louder. I also have the stock cooler PB fitted, which gives similar results (idle 45c, games 66c).

I'm very concerned about this as even my o/c'd Athlon 3000XP ran quite a bit cooler than this. If anyone could help that would be brilliant.

Cheers.

Edit: I'm using Speedfan to get the temps..which sensor should I use for the CPU, one labeled "CPU" on ATIGP SMBUS, DME1737 chip, or one labeled "Core" on "PCI" bus, "AMD K8" chipset.
September 8, 2006 9:00:49 PM

Maybe you should check your thermal paste.
September 8, 2006 9:09:59 PM

What do you mean by check it? I applied a thin layer over the base of the heatsink, and spread it over using the supplied coolermaster peice of plastic.
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September 8, 2006 9:39:54 PM

Too much is as bad as not enough, did you use a VERY small amount and spread it evenly? I prefer to use the artic silver method with the rice sized dot in the center of the cpu and the heatsink mashes it out evenly when it's latched down. Changing my application technique (using less paste) lowered the temps on a hot 3700 about 4 degrees C.
September 8, 2006 9:43:47 PM

IMO, you should reapply the thermal paste, using Arctic Silver instead of the crap that comes with the CPU.

Quote:
I prefer to use the artic silver method with the rice sized dot in the center of the cpu and the heatsink mashes it out evenly when it's latched down.


Do not rely on the CPU to spread the Arctic Silver, as it won't be distributed over the whole CPU. I prefer to spread the Arctic Silver with my finger inside a Ziploc bag.
September 8, 2006 9:47:23 PM

Yep I spread it evenly over the base of the heatsink using a credit card like peice of plastic. I never rely on the CPU to spread it. I only used a small bit.

Would spending a tenner on thermal paste actually lower the temp any though? The thermal grease I'm using is just cheap white stuff, but still.

Which temp reading do you think I should trust, the one Speedfan reports as coming from the processor, labeled "Core", or the motherboard CPU reading, which is the concerningly high one? Both vary in accordance with CPU load, but the "AMD K8" one never goes over 38C while the motherboard sensor is reporting 65C. Odd.
September 8, 2006 10:14:29 PM

I think you should tell us how your system fans are situated. A picture would be even better.

Tell us which fans are sucking into the case and which fans are blowing out.

Sure, your HSF might be cooling it properly, but if you don't have airflow to exhaust the hot air, a good HSF ain't gonna help much.
September 8, 2006 10:19:46 PM

Can't find the USB lead for the cam at the mo, but its all very simple, I have no added fans. The only extractor is the twin fan PSU, which has one fan pulling the hot air straight up from the cpu, and has another fan that pushes it out the back of the PSU. It makes no difference if the side panel is on or off.

Interesting thought, what is the heat difference between the cpu and the heatsink normally? My heatsink is cold. I've just spent 30 mins in a graphics & CPU intensive game and its still cooler than my GPU heatsink, which is in the mid-40's. Is there really that much of a difference between the CPU and heatsink temperature, or is it just my crappy MSI board is reporting the temperature higher than it actually is? The air being pushed out the back of the PSU is also cool, would it still be cool if the CPU was really running 65C?
September 8, 2006 11:36:09 PM

Quote:
Can't find the USB lead for the cam at the mo, but its all very simple, I have no added fans. The only extractor is the twin fan PSU, which has one fan pulling the hot air straight up from the cpu, and has another fan that pushes it out the back of the PSU. It makes no difference if the side panel is on or off.

Interesting thought, what is the heat difference between the cpu and the heatsink normally? My heatsink is cold. I've just spent 30 mins in a graphics & CPU intensive game and its still cooler than my GPU heatsink, which is in the mid-40's. Is there really that much of a difference between the CPU and heatsink temperature, or is it just my crappy MSI board is reporting the temperature higher than it actually is? The air being pushed out the back of the PSU is also cool, would it still be cool if the CPU was really running 65C?

I'd follow everyone else's advice about reseating your HSF. If its still overheating if you put a big fan next to the computer w/ the side panel out and its blowing cool air in, I'd say either the HSF isn't mounted right and/or you need better thermal paste.

I think you can go into the BIOS and monitor temps from there too if you question your motherboard software.
September 8, 2006 11:40:03 PM

How would you recommend re-seating it. I am confident the thermal grease was applied correctly, and I can't see how theres more than 1 way to clamp the heatsink on?

Putting a fan next to the system with the side off isn't an option, as its loud, impratical and wastes power.
September 8, 2006 11:54:44 PM

Quote:
How would you recommend re-seating it. I am confident the thermal grease was applied correctly, and I can't see how theres more than 1 way to clamp the heatsink on?

I mean reapply thermal grease using Artic Silver. Also to make sure that the heatsink is making contact w/ the processor.

Quote:
Putting a fan next to the system with the side off isn't an option, as its loud, impratical and wastes power.

Yes I know, but that's one heck of a way to test if your system or CPU is overheating. Having a big fan there would practically eliminate any heat trapped in the case. Its not a permanent solution, just a way to test if the heat is getting trapped in your case.
September 9, 2006 12:00:17 AM

I'll order some Artic Silver tomorrow if you reckon it'll make much of a difference.

The ambient temperature as reported by the bios and Speedfan is 27C with the case on or off. Room temp is 23C. I'll stick a big fan on the side of it tomorrow and see if it still runs hot under a heavy load.
September 9, 2006 12:16:08 AM

Quote:
What do you mean by check it? I applied a thin layer over the base of the heatsink, and spread it over using the supplied coolermaster peice of plastic.


Usually when you put thermal grease on, it should be on top of the CPU heat spreader. By putting it on the bottom of the HS, you can end up wasting more thermal grease that way, depending if you totally covered the bottom.

Most retail CPUs that come with stock HSF would have it already on the bottom, but that was done by machine, and prolly more precise amount.

Kinda hard to say if you have too much, which can help insulate heat.

I kinda think its just poor aiflow of the PC case. I had one PC case (still using) that had bad airflow. Turns out, everytime I ran a online game, it would freeze up. Had to open the side case, and the game ran fine.

Allot later on, I found a hot spot above the video card that was acutally a loop hole of heat fed back into the CPU. So I figured a way to duct the heat using cardboard and fan to push that heat spot away (out of the case) from the CPU HSF.
September 9, 2006 12:23:29 AM

True enough it used a bit more putting it on the heatsink. I only covered the surface area that touches the heat spreader though.

I only applied a thin layer, on my last system I did initally apply a bit too much which trapped the heat a bit, but on this i'm confident its okay on this one.

Anyway i'll order some Artic Silver and put it on the heat spreader next time. Whats the best way to remove the old thermal paste? I'd rather not spend another £6 on specific cleaning stuff for it.

On a random note..CPU-Z tells me it has a Venice core, 2.2Ghz 90nm. But I can't find anywhere that actually sells a 3400 with the Venice core, is it possible my system is an underclocked 3500 from the factory or something?

Thanks for all the advice so far guys, very helpful.
September 9, 2006 12:29:22 AM

In most cases, I wouldn't expect too much from AS5, especially if your room temps are at or above 80F.

Here are the AS5 instructions:

AS5 instructions

Quote:
ONLY Arctic Silver thermal compound should be between the processor core and the heatsink. Remove any thermal pads or other interface material from the heatsink before applying the Arctic Silver. Thermal pads can be scraped off with a plastic tool that will not scratch the bottom then the remnants can be removed with a xylene based cleaner, (Goof Off and some carburetor cleaners) acetone, mineral spirits, or high-purity isopropyl alcohol.

Never use any oil or petroleum based cleaners (WD-40, citrus oil based cleaners and many automotive degreasers) on the base of a heatsink. The oil, which is engineered to not evaporate, will fill in the microscopic valleys in the metal and significantly reduce the effectiveness of any subsequently applied thermal compound.

If your heatsink has a thermal 'pad' mounted on it, this pad must be removed before using Arctic Silver thermal compound. Thermal pads are made with paraffin wax that melts once it gets hot. When it melts, it will fill in the microscopic valleys in the heatsink with wax. To minimize the permanent contamination of the mounting surface with wax, the thermal pad should be removed before it is used and melted. Never use heat or hot water to remove the pad, the heat will melt the wax into the heatsink.
September 9, 2006 3:07:13 AM

It's possible that his heatsink is mounted improperly or that there's not enough thermal conductivity between the CPU and heatsink, but do you really think AS5 will make the difference between his heatsink being cool and getting warm? The difference between AS5 and cheap thermal paste is usually only a few degrees which isn't a big enough difference to be described as going from a cold heatsink to a warm one.

But as far as diagnosing the problem goes, a big fan on the side might help. I just can't imagine the problem being heat getting stuck in the case if his GPU doesn't peak above 40C, which is quite cool by GPU standards. If it's a problem of hot air getting stuck, all of his temperatures should be high.

Because it's just CPU temperatures, then I'd say it's either an inaccurate reporting, or a problem with the heatsink. I'd try using a different program to monitor temperatures and see if that changes anything.

If that doesn't help, and the heatsink is properly mounted and the thermal paste correctly applied, then either your temperature sensor on the motherboard is just wrong, or you need a new HSF.

But for the record, your HSF should be at least getting warm.

Another possibility, though I doubt this is it, is that you need to upgrade your BIOS. Sometimes the fan won't spin as fast as it maybe should be spinning (the HSF fan speed is controlled by the BIOS), which can cause an increase in temperatures, but since you said your heatsink isn't even warm (which it should be), I would assume it's a problem with the heatsink itself.

For whatever reason, it sounds like the heat generated from your CPU isn't being properly dissipated to the heatsink.

Also, check your BIOS for idle temperatures. What is it reporting?
September 9, 2006 9:05:27 AM

I really don't think its trapped heat, because every other temp is fine. HD's are all around the 32C mark, right now the ambient temp is 2C above room temp, and the "Core" cpu reading is 31C. Its just the mobo cpu temp is 45C, and thats just sitting here typing this message.

I'll get some AS5 on there anyway, just to rule out the thermal grease I used being crap, and my application of it.

The GPU peaks around 50C after a couple of hours of gaming, but its idle temp is 40-42C.

To clarify a bit, when its sitting here doing nothing, the heatsink is almost cold. When its in games and the like, it does heat up a bit. The fan on the HSF pushes a pretty suprising amount of air.

It has the latest bios, but I can't find any other application that can monitor the temperatures of the board. Is an MSI MS-7168, using the ATI RS400 chipset. MBM doesn't recognise it and I don't know of any other utility for this.

The bios reports the idle temp to be around 48C.
September 9, 2006 10:14:22 AM

Just to update, it seems the thermal paste I applied has stabalised a bit now its been heat cycled, because it didn't quite hit 60C while playing call of duty 2 this morning. Still confused about which sensor to believe though, have a look at the attached pic of Speedfan and tell me which sensor you think is reporting incorrectly. The green one is the mobo, the grey one is reported to be on the processor, and red is ambient case temp. Prior to taking the screenshot i'd been playing COD2 for a while to see what temps it gets up to.

Really pleased with it compared to my old 3000XP though, performance is up more than I thought it would be, and it runs significantly quieter when not in a game.

September 9, 2006 8:24:49 PM

nobly, tried as you suggested and stuck a big desk fan next to it with the side off. Doesn't make a whole lot of difference to the cpu, so that rules out bad ventilation. Dropped ambient temp by 3C (24C), cpu temps remain the same (47C idle on the mobo sensor, 33C idle on the "AMD-K8" sensor).

Did cool the HD's down though :) 
September 9, 2006 8:57:45 PM

Yeah, the HSF on my old 3400+ idled at 28C.
September 9, 2006 9:23:10 PM

verndewd, thanks for the links. Unfortunately I do not have a stock AMD cooler (the stock one has a copper slab on the bottom right?), only the one Packard Bell fitted, which isn't a very good design, and the Akasa I picked up from my local shop for a fiver.

The system design isn't too old, you can see the case http://www.packardbell.co.uk/products/live/at-home/desktops/imedia/imedia-2559/productsheet-PB34316801-46.html Internally its a fairly standard design, it took my old PSU without a problem (came with a 250W PSU..didn't know them still sold them 8O ).

What other monitoring applications would you recommend? The system came with none, MBM doesn't recognise the board, so the only one I know of is Speedfan, which has always worked well for me.
September 9, 2006 9:45:41 PM

Nice one, thanks.

Everest raised an interesting detail. My CPU ID says its a 3400, but it identified it as a 3500, which makes sense, as the Venice wasn't released as a 3400? Odd.

Everest is reporting the same temp as the bios and Speedfan - right now 49C just browsing the web. Personally I think the motherboard sensor is way off, as the heatsink doesn't feel over 40C, and Speedfan reckons it can read the temp direct from the CPU, and that currently reads 33C. Varies in accordance with the motherboard reported temp, as per the graph I posted.
September 9, 2006 10:09:55 PM

Unfortunately I don't have an IR temp reader. I'm used to guessing motor temps with my RC truck though, I know the heatsink is definately a lot less than the motherboard is reporting. Is the actual cpu though? I don't know.

For comparison, right now the cpu heatsink is cooler than the video card heatsink. And i'm just sitting here listening to music, so neither are doing much. The GPU is at 42C.
September 9, 2006 10:11:24 PM

There is SO MUCH wrong with this thread I don't know where to start.

- Akasa 860 is junk, expected to do poor job. Even so, idle 47 gaming 62 is not exceptionally high (so long as stable. HOWEVER, both of these numbers are meaningless. The relevant number is that of it running at full load for an extended period of time at the highest ambient temp the (room) is expected to encounter year-round, or if it's not feasible to get the room that hot, add this offset to the CPU temp observed now (as above, full load).

- Spreading heatsink compond is always wrong! It cannot result in as thin a layer as only applying to the middle. Well I should restate this, barely spreading that tiny grain-of-rice (or less with very flat 'sink) only in the center can more quickly normalize the CPU temp instead of a few extra thermal cycles, but either way, spreading over the whole core or metal spreader on top is wrong, it can never be as thin because it results in more comopond over whichever area is *highest*.

- Forget exotic compounds or Arctic Silver for this purpose, there is no special compound needed to achieve acceptible temps with that CPU at stock speed. However, silicone based grease may degrade over time (months or more), it's longevity is a larger issue. If you find a substantial difference in temp with premium compound, it means compound was way too thickly applied (presuming average quality generic compound, there is of course some really poor junk that's dried out, separated or too thin.

- There is no need to spread it with plastic bag on your finger. It'll work fine that way, if it weren't for that part about it being worse to spread it, but the stuff is not especially toxic nor is it significant to get tiny trace amounts of finger oil on it. If your hands are absolutely filthy just wash them first.
September 9, 2006 10:17:48 PM

If you have nothing useful to contribute, please don't waste my time typing crap. Or at least be polite about it :!:

The relevant temperature to me is the highest it hits while doing what I want to do with it. The most demanding thing I do normally is play games, therefore the maximum temperature it hits in a game is whats important to me. Not the temp it can hit while running a program designed purely to generate cpu heat.

So the HSF is poor quality, you don't expect much for a fiver these days, its better than what I had, and the fan is actually very quiet at any RPM.
September 9, 2006 10:25:32 PM

(continued)

- We can ignore case airflow for the moment by merely opening the side and pointing a desk fan at it. We aren't suggesting this as a constant state, only to find out what's going on with your case cooling and temps- troubleshooting purposes only. It'd be a bit of a waste to suggest you start carving up the case to improve airflow then later find out it wasn't the problem, BUT sometimes it IS the problem. The open case/desk-fan is a good gauge of this.

- It is easy to see which software temp report is correct based on which rapidly elevates in temp when a stress program like Prime95's Torture Test is ran. Some reporting uses an offset though, which is why it is better to just look at the bios screen temp and forget your idle temp. Bios screen temp is typically around 70% of the difference between idle and full load, as a ballpark that would be close enough to gauge which monitoring temp is correct (but again, observe if it changes with stress test programs).

- When heatsink is cold, again run the stress test program to generate a known amount of load/heat. THEN touch-test the 'sink and if not reflective of a similar rise in temp, it is not making good contact with CPU.

- Run Prime95's Torture Test for 12 hours/overnight. If there are no errors, you might consider just leaving it alone (if aforementioned full load temp test doesn't cause a significant rise over the gaming temp already reported). However, if the case cooling were bad, more important to focus on the other system parts- HDD, motherboard capacitors, PSU exhaust temp (not case exhaust, we're concerned about PSU capacitor overheating mostly, but also other discrete BJT or diodes in the longer term).

- You can't just apply thermal compound again and then get a meaningful temp till a few days and thermal cycles have occured. It tends to normalize after about 3-4 days and thermal cycles, or much longer (maybe a week or two) if system isn't turned off or under as much load. Even so, it's only a few degrees diff, usually, unless compound was put on way too thick.

- Why did you bother buying a $5 heatsink? What did you expect? Important- Most low-end 'sinks ratings for the CPus they can handle are outright lies, unless you're willing to run the CPU very very hot. It's been that way since the beginning.
September 9, 2006 10:31:48 PM

Quote:
If you have nothing useful to contribute, please don't waste my time typing crap. Or at least be polite about it :!:


I state fact without any concern for ego. Sometimes that offends, but if someone is offended by a plain statement that they're doing something sub-optimal, in a problematic way, what is the point in not just stating it?

What has wasted your time???

Several posts that didn't ask the right questions or solve the problem. This is NOT an accusation of all posts, many had good points but the good points generally do not need restated as "that's right" but even so, I did it some too.

The larger question is why your system is not as cool as the typical system, what you are doing differently. If you can't accept that something you are doing has caused the higher temp, how will it be solved?

What I mean is, if you choose a low quality sink and are ok with the higher temps that result, fine. If you choose a high quality sink and have lower temps, fine too. If you choose a low quality sink and have high temps and then think high temps are a problem, what are we to say that you don't already know?

Quote:
The relevant temperature to me is the highest it hits while doing what I want to do with it. The most demanding thing I do normally is play games, therefore the maximum temperature it hits in a game is whats important to me. Not the temp it can hit while running a program designed purely to generate cpu heat.


With all due respect, it doesn't really matter if that's what you think, if you want the system set up properly it has to survive any possible running state and that includes times when a virus or windows bug or program infinite loop or whatever, causes a temp elevation. If anyone buys an OEM system that can't pass the full load test, a lawsuit should result, this is a manditory part of proper system setup.

Now, if you don't mind this, what's the point of the thread? If it'll be too hot at full load, it'll also look pretty hot at a little less than full load. Others that have lower temp, likewise have lower full load temp. That's the whole point you're failing to see, there is a reason for the suggestion whether you understand why or not it is not an insult, it's time-tested good system design and testing, which is how problems get solved rather than spreading urban myths.

Quote:
So the HSF is poor quality, you don't expect much for a fiver these days, its better than what I had, and the fan is actually very quiet at any RPM.


Ok but is this not an obvious reason to change it? This is the same situation as any system, put too low a quality and low an RPM sink on and... heat builds up more. If you were ok with this, fine, but instead we have this thread about temp.

The bottom line- nobody compels anyone to do anything, but there are lots of ways to make things easier, or to waste time.
September 9, 2006 10:52:22 PM

Quote:
If you have nothing useful to contribute, please don't waste my time typing crap. Or at least be polite about it :!:


Futher, when you ask for free help, sometimes the truth will hurt. Who are you to label crap?

Have some respect for those who came before you and don't need help, that it is worse to NOT point out fallacies because if you don't, then the next time around some n00b has learned things wrong (this not directed at you, I mean the NEXT person) and repeats the myths, even arguing about them.

I know some of you are thinking "but I have only 35-odd posts". There's more out there than one forum.
September 10, 2006 12:14:09 AM

Hmm, I don't think I made myself too clear. I appreciate your contribution to this thread and the suggestions you have made, but when I initally read your post, you came off with a negative tone which implied every other persons contribution was worthless, which they're not. However, I probably read it the wrong way, and for this I apologise. I didn't mean to come off offensive towards you nor ment any disrespect.

I purchased a £5 heatsink, because its all they had in stock. I figured it had to be better than the crappy one already fitted, and I used an older Akasa heatsink on my 3000XP and was very pleased with it, for the price. If you could suggest one that would be a good improvement that isn't too pricey, i'll order it right now.

The fan is at low RPM when its not really doing anything. When I go into a game or something, its RPM increases quite a bit. When its first turned on, its even louder.

Of course I want it to run at a good temperature under maximum loads. What I ment to say was my priority is to have it running at a respectable temperature for what I do with it. I would like it to remain cool while running CPU intensive tests like you suggest.

Personally, I'm none too pleased with the motherboard. Its stopped recognising drives on the secondary IDE cable now. I've tried changing the cable, both the drives, tried switching them to cable-select, reset the bios, and simply plugging the primary IDE cable into the secondary port, and it still doesn't do anything. If I plug it back in the primary port though, it works fine.
September 10, 2006 12:28:09 AM

To update, I've just started running Prime95, the motherboards reported cpu temp increased 15C from 49C up to 64C, but I felt only a small difference on the heatsink, definately not 15C worth. So would it be reasonable to conclude, there's poor thermal conductivity between the cpu, and the heatsink, so the heat isn't transferring correctly?

Infact, the temp on the heatsink of the chipset is higher than the cpu's heatsink.
September 10, 2006 10:18:58 AM

The problem is the cpu isn't touching the HSF!
Since the HSF is cold to the touch leads me to think the problem is there is a gap between the AMD 3400 mobile's silicon and the base of the HSF. Remember this is a mobile chip used in a mobo that would normally use an AMD 64 chip with a heat dissipating lid. The HSFs used on the desktop mobos take into account the thickness of the lid, when you use a mobile AMD 64 you would end up with a gap between the chip's silicon and the bottom of the HSF.
Thus the heat wouldn't be transferred from the cpu to the HSF and the cpu would overheat and hopefully be shutdown by the mobo overtemp monitor.
John.
September 10, 2006 10:25:09 AM

How did you establish I have a mobile processor? Thats news to me. The heatsink was a fairly tight clamp.

I do agree though I don't think theres good thermal transfer between the cpu and heatsink, I'm going to see if any local retailers have a better one in today (nooo, only comp shop around here open on sundays is pc world *shudder*).
September 10, 2006 11:10:39 AM

Sorry, I was doing to many things at one time and I responded to the wrong forum, but do look closer at the HSF to cpu area. The difference in temp shouldn't be that different. Good luck
September 10, 2006 5:22:02 PM

No worries.

I really do hate computers sometimes. Imagine this: system is stone cold, having been off for a number of hours. Room temp is 21C. I turn it on, and the 1st thing I do is go into the bios to check temps. I have the temps up within 7-8 secs of pressing the power switch. The case temp is 21C (room temp), but the CPU temp is 53C. 21-53C in a few seconds with no load and only 1.3v being fed into it? I don't think so.

What also doesn't make sense, is after using it for an hour or so, experimenting with a new game mod so it has a fairly high load, then deciding to re-apply the thermal paste, going from a high load to having the system off and the HSF removed within a couple of mins, the cpu is *not* 50-60c. It feels only warm, like 40C or so warm. Don't tell me it can cool from 65C to 40C that quick, espically with the heatsink remaining only mildly warm the whole time?

This has led me to believe the motherboards thermal sensor is faulty. Whereabouts is the sensor normally anyhow? I decided I did put a bit too much thermal grease on before, so removed it all, cleaned up both surfaces, and applied less. Dropped temps by 2-3C.

Now, the sensor that Speedfan identifies as "AMD K8 Core" reads 28C on idle, and yet the motherboards reported cpu temp is 45C. Can there be any realistic possibility except for a bad sensor reading? This is what confuses me, having two conflicting reads, that both vary in accordance with cpu voltage and load, one being the motherboard, the other being identified as straight from the cpu.

If you look here, you will see what I'm referring to (speedfan reading the cpu's internal temp directly), Speedfan Notes Look under V4.29 news.
September 11, 2006 5:57:54 PM

Its starting to sound like a bad sensor to me too.

I don't think we ever asked you - what motherboard do you have?
September 11, 2006 5:59:54 PM

Motherboards an MSI-7168. Its an OEM board only used by NEC/Packard Bell as far as I know. Its very limited in terms of voltage/speed adjustments, as in, there are none :(  Uses the ATI RS400 chipset.

Does seem very stable so far though. Good Linux compatibility, everything was auto detected and configured. No fan on the chipset just a big heatsink, which is nice.
September 11, 2006 9:34:49 PM

Give Core Temp a try, it read the temp straight from the on-die sensor.

I'm also curious to know if your CPU is a bare die (no IHS) mobile/DTR CPU...
September 11, 2006 10:11:25 PM

Maybe You have a stuffy or case or one with little airflow.
September 11, 2006 10:48:57 PM

Quote:
Hi, I've very recently brought a new system, it uses an Athlon 3400 (Venice),....


Correct me if I am wrong but these 2 specs cannot belong to the same CPU; a 3400+ is a S-754 while Venice cores are socket 939 CPUs. What CPU do you exactly have?
September 11, 2006 11:24:22 PM

Okay, this is just getting silly. Never ever post a 'help me' thread if you're not going to give good details for people to look at.

List everything, I mean everything. Cpu, board, ram, powersupply, fan directions, settings, phase of the moon, omit no detail because if you do, you'll end up wasting everybodies time.

First, yes the 3400 Venice exists, and yes it is a 754 chip. And it is a 2400MHz 90nm 67W chip so it should idle around 30, and hit 40 underload even with a stock hsf. I have the 3000+ 51W 754 oc'd to 2.6 on the stock hsf, and well, i think bf2 hit 42 deg one day after 6 hours....

I've never heard of a cpu fan 'pulling' heat away from a chip, rather the opposite for every chip I've ever seen - blowing air down onto it to get it away from the cpu. Maybe you install the fan backwards, but I've never heard of the hsf (ghetto: arctic freezer, else get a real thermalright or zalman 7000/9500)

Though I also read the chip is running at 2200MHz, which adds more confusion. The fun aspect of this 'fix' is the fact that MSI made both a 754 and 939 version of that board... But if it reads a 3400 in CPU-Z it should be a 754.

Again, list all the facts however seemingly unnecessary or the help you get will be a waste
September 11, 2006 11:24:41 PM

Quote:
Maybe You have a stuffy or case or one with little airflow.

We already dealt with that, please read the thread before posting.
:) 
September 12, 2006 9:15:18 PM

all I can say is WOW; it's a rarity, kind of 939 Semprons or (less rare) X2 3600+.
!