Type of Photo printer

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

We have an Epson R300 printer used for printing of photo's here at
work. They have asked me to see about purchasing a Laser Color to
replace this printer. My question is, in order to save money and have
good quality photo printing, what format of printers is best.
I realize that laser is for volume color printing and ink jet is for
better resolution. Where does dye sub fall into in this scenario.
Thanks in advance.
5 answers Last reply
More about type photo printer
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "wizof103" <wizof103@bellatlantic.net> wrote in message
    news:1124720928.802354.205180@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > We have an Epson R300 printer used for printing of photo's here at
    > work. They have asked me to see about purchasing a Laser Color to
    > replace this printer. My question is, in order to save money and have
    > good quality photo printing, what format of printers is best.
    > I realize that laser is for volume color printing and ink jet is for
    > better resolution. Where does dye sub fall into in this scenario.
    > Thanks in advance.

    Dye sub is very expensive. Don't fall for the high number resolution of
    inkjets. Considering the number of dots needed to produce 1 colour it
    doesn't match up. Final print resolution even on a fuji frontier is 300dpi.

    Dye subs are expensive to buy and run. There are varying opinions on
    quality. The ones you get such as those kodak instaprint kiosks in boots is
    that they are inferior to proper minilab prints.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In message <1124720928.802354.205180@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
    wizof103 <wizof103@bellatlantic.net> writes
    >We have an Epson R300 printer used for printing of photo's here at
    >work. They have asked me to see about purchasing a Laser Color to
    >replace this printer. My question is, in order to save money and have
    >good quality photo printing, what format of printers is best.
    >I realize that laser is for volume color printing and ink jet is for
    >better resolution. Where does dye sub fall into in this scenario.
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    How much printing are you doing, and what are the photos being used for?

    --
    Timothy
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    wizof103 wrote:
    > We have an Epson R300 printer used for printing of photo's here at
    > work. They have asked me to see about purchasing a Laser Color to
    > replace this printer. My question is, in order to save money and have
    > good quality photo printing, what format of printers is best.
    > I realize that laser is for volume color printing and ink jet is for
    > better resolution. Where does dye sub fall into in this scenario.
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    Kodak have a relatively new dye-sub, the 1400 priced at around US$500.
    It can do 12 x 8 inch or 10 x 8 prints, photo quality is supposed to be
    pretty good.

    The upsides are:
    Fixed cost - you know exactly how much each print costs in consumables -
    and that cost is comparable to inkjets - not a lot more.
    Water and mar resistant prints - not achievable with dye inkjet on
    papers that provide archival properties.
    Probably much better archival properties than low end dye subs, which
    have extremely poor fade resistance. Kodak figures for longevity should
    be ignored as their test methodology is different - and far less severe
    than the methodolgy used by almost every other maker. But, similar
    process dye-sub prints from Kodak have rated 26 years, which isn't too bad.
    Kodak claim advantages because of continuous tone printing, but this
    isn't really an issue as the dots from any recent quality inkjet photo
    printer are invisible to the naked eye anyway.
    Reasonable speed - a minute and a half per print.
    Much better photo quality than a laser printer.
    No ink clogs.

    Downsides are:
    You can't feed small (ie 6x4s) individually, but you could print 4 6x4s
    on one 12x8 sheet, and cut them.
    Useless for document printing.
    Only prints on OEM gloss/semigloss Kodak dye-sub paper.
    About 300 dpi, but this won't be as sharp or resolve as much fine detail
    as 300dpi from a light-jet or ink-jet - not that most people would notice.
    Reduced colour gamut - 3 colour process - compared to higher end ink jet.
    Dust can be an issue.
    The machine costs about the same as an epson R1800, which will do 13"
    width prints which have better archival quality, are also water
    resistant, and can print documents as well as photos on a wide range of
    media.

    I haven't seen one of these in action yet. They seem an ideal
    alternative to an inkjet for some circumstances and if only photo
    printing is required.

    The answer to your question isn't easy - it depends very much on what
    you plan to print and your expectation for print quality, print volume
    and frequency.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    ian lincoln wrote:

    > Dye sub is very expensive. Don't fall for the high number resolution of
    > inkjets. Considering the number of dots needed to produce 1 colour it
    > doesn't match up. Final print resolution even on a fuji frontier is 300dpi.
    >
    > Dye subs are expensive to buy and run. There are varying opinions on
    > quality. The ones you get such as those kodak instaprint kiosks in boots is
    > that they are inferior to proper minilab prints.
    >
    >
    See my other post - dye-subs are not necessarily that expensive now.

    And although inkjets will not in reality resolve the "headline" figure
    printed on the box or brochure (4880/5660 dpi etc), I can assure you
    that an epson r800 or 1800 will clearly resolve over 600dpi - more than
    twice the resolution of a typical light-jet set at around 300dpi.
    Finding practical use for such high resolution is another matter. You
    can see the difference between 300dpi and 600dpi if you peer very
    closely, but I await an affordable 30mp camera to make use of this on an
    A4 sized print.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    wizof103 wrote:

    > We have an Epson R300 printer used for printing of photo's here at
    > work. They have asked me to see about purchasing a Laser Color to
    > replace this printer. My question is, in order to save money and have
    > good quality photo printing, what format of printers is best.
    > I realize that laser is for volume color printing and ink jet is for
    > better resolution. Where does dye sub fall into in this scenario.
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    Someone posted here recently that Epson have released a new Laser
    printer. have you checked that out?
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