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Idling at 50 C degrees ... Why? I've tried everything.

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  • CPUs
  • Heatsinks
  • Thermal Compound
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September 9, 2006 6:41:26 AM

Can someone please tell my stupid self why I am idling so hot?? I am at my wits end and have tried everything. Brand new computer that I built myself from scratch (my first build) and the case is brand new too, so it's not a dust issue.

I got rid of my stock fan and heatsink for an Arctic Freezer Pro 7, I put a new coat of thermal compound on the chip after wiping off the old compound from the stock fan/heatsink.

Even with my case fans and CPU fan all at full power, I am idling at 48-52 C degrees. My mobo temp is ~40 C degrees.

There are no errors in my system logs (My Computer/Manage), I've actually taken off the new fan/heatsink, reapplied the thermal compound AGAIN (after wiping the old off of course), and reseated the fan/heatsink. No difference.

Everywhere I look I see everyone else idling in the low-to-mid 30s, some in the 40s. I'm up in the 50s. This is me idling, NOTHING running. Why???? At full load, I'd be up in the 70s.

Please if any of you guys can offer me suggestions or have any idea why I am idling so high, please let me know. I appreciate it.

Best regards (My system specs are below in my sig).

More about : idling degrees

September 9, 2006 7:11:06 AM

Would you beable to provide a picture of the inside of your case.

Also your room temp

I know how you feel, I have the Pentium D 805 and when I originally got it it was idling/load 140-170F. I have gotten them down to 107F idle with a Zalman 9500 HSF and max load 135F. Still I dont even really like these temps, but there better then what they where. Basically my first totally complete new build, built it within past few weeks.


All I can say to check and look out for are as followed...

Check HSF and make sure you applied AS5 correctly small layer and have your HSF flat on the CPU fully connected.

Make sure your getting correct airflow

Try and make sure your cables aren't inflicting airflow

Try and have a front intake case fan, and a rear exhaust fan.

Make sure all the fans including the Video Card are all spinning

And just make sure everything looks right inside, and everything is connected.


Try and post a pic of you can.

Storm~
September 9, 2006 7:16:34 AM

Quote:
Please if any of you guys can offer me suggestions or have any idea why I am idling so high, please let me know. I appreciate it.


Simple - it's a Presler! Just kidding.

Are you using the onboard CPU temp sensor? If so, do you have a thermocouple around? I've placed a sensor up against the IHS on a few systems and have been within 2 or 3C of reasonably functional onboard sensors. I've also seen onboard sensors that are 7 or so degrees off.

How did you clean the HSF and IHS mating surfaces? They need to be very clean - I've taken to using the Arctic Silver cleaner. Along these lines, are you sure you're mounting the HSF properly?

Are you at stock volts? Those 3 categories are all I can think of in this sleep-deprived state.
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September 9, 2006 7:24:42 AM

Take a close look at the positioning of the hsf in relationship to the bank of capacitors next to the socket.
You may not be seating the cooler properly because of the layout of the motherboard components.
Remove the hsf clean and reapply the thermal paste.
With steady pressure slide the heat sink in a small circular motion.
You should have no resistance (like sliding on ice) of course that’s a slight exaggeration but you get the picture.
You may have to position the hsf facing another direction to stay clear of what ever is obstructing your installation.
Make sure the locking pins are not turned in the release direction and push two pins across from each other down fairly hard
You should hear it snap in place.
Again with the remaining pins.
If that will not remedy your heat issue update to the latest bios and check temps in bios comparing it to within windows environment.
If you’re still hot and the base of the heat sink is not hot to the touch you may have to rma the board for faulty thermal diode.
September 13, 2006 1:50:52 AM

Is it safe to clean the HSF with Lacquer Thinner or other Paint thinners or will they pit the base of the HSF? Also, is it a good idea to lap the HS while it's off the CPU?
September 13, 2006 4:43:04 AM

To answer all of your questions:

My fans are set up with a pair of front vent fans (80mm) blowing inward (toward the back of my case). I've got a side panel fan (80mm)blowing inward onto my video card. Then there's my rear case fan (120mm) blowing outward out of the rear of the case. Then there's the CPU fan.

My room temperature is normal -- between 70 and 75 farenheit -- in fact right now it's 67 in here with the window open and my CPU is at 47 Celcius.

I've updated to the latest bios.

I've reapplied the thermal compound two times now, but i still see these high temps.

Here's what I'm thinking. I think I may have put the thermal compound onto my processor incorrectly. I spread a thin layer of it throughout the surface of the processor. A friend was telling me that I'm not supposed to spread it. He said the the Pentium D, I should have just put a small amount -- about the size of a drop you'd put in your eye -- onto the processor and then just laid the heatsink onto the processor. He said I shouldn't have spread it. That didn't sound right to me though. If he is right, I'll have to break out the rubbing alcohol and reapply for the third time. He also told me at the beginning to turn the computer off at night for the first week or so to allow the compound to settle, then after a week of turning it off at night, I can leave it on at all times. Does any of this sound right?

Thanks to everyone here for their input so far, I appreciate it.
September 13, 2006 5:03:02 AM

Make sure in your windows setup the computer is set up as laptop notebook to utilize the speedstep.

But other than that your processor tends to run very hot. I've seen people run them from 65-78 celcius. I have seen reports when people have them in the 90's...

But don't worry, that processor should be fine up to 68 Celcius with lots of room to spare.
September 14, 2006 2:32:57 PM

Well I've tried it all. I even took out the processor, heatsink and fan for a third AND fourth time to clean and reapply the thermal compound. This time I did it the right way too by placing a little more than a rice-sized dot of the thermal compound and just placing the heatsink on top as opposed to what I was mistakenly doing earlier and spreading the compound on the processor before snapping the heatsink in.

Anyway, I'll have to live with these high idle temps. But I wanted to ask, another thing I just read is that at the beginning I will have higher temperatures -- right now I'm at a steady 48-50 C degrees at idle. By turning the computer off at night when I'm not using it, will that help the compound settle better and eventually bring me somewhat cooler idle temps? I was told to turn it off at night for about the first week to two weeks to help the compound settle and that there is about a two week adjustment period. Any truth to this? I read it on a newsgroup, so wasn't sure how true this was.

Thanks again all for your help and suggestions.
September 14, 2006 4:01:27 PM

Quote:
Well I've tried it all. I even took out the processor, heatsink and fan for a third AND fourth time to clean and reapply the thermal compound. This time I did it the right way too by placing a little more than a rice-sized dot of the thermal compound and just placing the heatsink on top as opposed to what I was mistakenly doing earlier and spreading the compound on the processor before snapping the heatsink in.


There are numerous belief systems for setting up HSFs. I like the rice grain in the center plan and I gently rotate the HSF back and forth to help the grease disperse. Ideally, the HSF/IHS junction will have a very thin, evenly dispersed layer of grease with no air entrained. If you could prepare clean, atomically flat IHS and HSF surfaces, no grease would be needed.

Quote:
Anyway, I'll have to live with these high idle temps. But I wanted to ask, another thing I just read is that at the beginning I will have higher temperatures -- right now I'm at a steady 48-50 C degrees at idle. By turning the computer off at night when I'm not using it, will that help the compound settle better and eventually bring me somewhat cooler idle temps? I was told to turn it off at night for about the first week to two weeks to help the compound settle and that there is about a two week adjustment period. Any truth to this? I read it on a newsgroup, so wasn't sure how true this was.


Supposedly, the heating and cooling cycles help the grease disperse and thin. Makes sense to me. A while back, we had trouble with a lab instrument that put out a large amount of heat so we made up larger HSF and took some time to optimize the flatness of the interface. It was worth the effort and you could see it when pulling it apart to look at the thermal grease dispersion. The mating surface was ~3x5" and it would take a few days of use and a bunch of hot/cold cycles for it to self-thin.
September 14, 2006 7:24:27 PM

Just extra info on Artic Silver 5. If your referring to AS5, it does have a break in time.

I noticed when I redid my HSF, my 7700 seemed loose. I could turn it back and forth even though the screwes were as tight as they could be. After 2 days (running prime, then shutting down to cool each day) the HSF didn't move at all.

It does however take 200 hours to cure:

Quote:
Important Reminder:
Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired.
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September 14, 2006 7:49:52 PM

When you took the HSF off to redo the compound, was the old stuff spread out, or was it still mostly centered? If not spread out, then maybe the HSF was resting on something else and not forming a good bond with the CPU.
Check your BIOS for an unintended overvolt or overclock.

Are you confident that your PSU output is to spec?

After the PC has been off for a while, and you first turn it on, what are the temps? How fast do they climb, or do they? If they start high and don't climb, your sensor may be way off.
September 15, 2006 4:23:30 PM

Quote:
Just extra info on Artic Silver 5. If your referring to AS5, it does have a break in time.

It does however take 200 hours to cure:


Grimmy, yes it is the Arctic Silver 5. Let me ask you, when you first applied your Arctic Silver, were you getting high temperatures for the first 200 hours or so like I am? Right now what I'm doing is turning my computer off all day while I'm at work, but leaving it on from the time I get home until the time I wake up the next morning.
September 15, 2006 4:40:28 PM

When I started using AS5, my temps were about the same as the reg thermal grease I used to use with my stock and zalman HSF.

Thing is, I never saw a 2-5C difference in switching to it (even after 200 hours). But then, when my room is 80F or higher, I'm not going to see much of a difference. My idle temps are normally 43-44C. Also I'm using a 478 CPU.

In your case, that 775 socket HSF has me wondering. Really hard to say if it is mounted correctly since I've seen people having problems with C2D CPUs.
September 15, 2006 4:54:08 PM

Quote:
When you took the HSF off to redo the compound, was the old stuff spread out, or was it still mostly centered? If not spread out, then maybe the HSF was resting on something else and not forming a good bond with the CPU.
Check your BIOS for an unintended overvolt or overclock.

Are you confident that your PSU output is to spec?

After the PC has been off for a while, and you first turn it on, what are the temps? How fast do they climb, or do they? If they start high and don't climb, your sensor may be way off.


My PSU Is an Antec Neo Power 550 Watt. When I first turn the computer on and go straight into the BIOS to look at the temperatures, it's in the upper 30s (37 .... 37.5 ... 38 ) and quickly jumps into the low 40s within a minute.
September 15, 2006 5:20:21 PM

You have s D940. This is normal for a D940.
September 15, 2006 5:27:34 PM

I also found a cure time for AS5, but it didn't take 200+ hours for it to happen. It was roughly a two-week period of keeping the computer on for 2-6 hours a day. I saw a 2-3C drop. Like Clue69Less, the AS5 I used was rice grain sized and I twisted the heat sink a few times to seat it.

After installing the Zalman CNPS9500 with AS5, my D805 overclocked to 3.5 GHz has the same idle temps as the D805 at stock speed with stock heat sink -- 45-47C (granted the room temp is a few degrees C cooler now).
September 16, 2006 1:23:41 AM

I have a 945 Presler with the Zalman 9500 and the cpu idels at 24 c used artic silver but I also lapped the HSF because it had a slight raised bump in the center not letting it sit flush on the cpu before that the same HS was on a P-4 Prescott idled at 30 got as high as 50 playing game this D core is running real cool so far and it overclocked 10 percen to 3.74 and then again I have a P-3 that runs hot so I have tried to figure out how the temps work just as long as they don't get to hot.
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