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European (220-240V) power supply for Canon Pixma iP6000d?

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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 1:13:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hello,

I have a US model Canon Pixma iP6000d that I'm planning to take overseas with
me. In the immediate future, I'll just use a 220V->120V step-down
transformer, but I'm noticing that the power supplies on the Pixmas literally
snap in and out. Does anyone know where I might be able to purchase the
European power supply for the iP6000d? I believe it's the same power supply
that the other Pixmas use, although so far I've been unable to locate a part
number. Anyone know?

Thanks,
---Joel Kolstad
August 23, 2005 1:56:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> I have a US model Canon Pixma iP6000d that I'm planning to take overseas with
> me. In the immediate future, I'll just use a 220V->120V step-down
> transformer, but I'm noticing that the power supplies on the Pixmas literally
> snap in and out.

> Anyone know?

Not off the top of my head, but this is something you can find out on
your own by hitting the canon website and looking for repair places
near you, or where you will be. I could check the service manual for
the mp760 but I don't know if that would be the same, and it's in
deutch.

The Euro supply is auto switching, the north american one is not. If
get a euro supply you don't have to switch back. This is what many
yanks discovered when ordering their Pixmas from overseas, they were
often included with a simple plug adapter. While I don't have the euro
service manual for the ip series, I do have one for the mp series and
those are listed officaly as 100->240v 50 to 60hz.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 11:45:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The unit on my UK model IP4000 is: K30235
Keep in mind that there are many different types of power in "Europe".


"Joel Kolstad" <JKolstad71HatesSpam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11gl8jl75cjvfad@corp.supernews.com...
> Hello,
>
> I have a US model Canon Pixma iP6000d that I'm planning to take overseas
with
> me. In the immediate future, I'll just use a 220V->120V step-down
> transformer, but I'm noticing that the power supplies on the Pixmas
literally
> snap in and out. Does anyone know where I might be able to purchase the
> European power supply for the iP6000d? I believe it's the same power
supply
> that the other Pixmas use, although so far I've been unable to locate a
part
> number. Anyone know?
>
> Thanks,
> ---Joel Kolstad
>
>
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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 1:06:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Dan,

"Dan G" <Dan@xxxx.com> wrote in message
news:vM-dnYnk1NIxtZbeRVn-1A@comcast.com...
> The unit on my UK model IP4000 is: K30235
> Keep in mind that there are many different types of power in "Europe".

Yeah, but just as the "US" model is 100-120V, 50/60Hz (i.e., Japan and USA
voltages), I would be really surprised if the "European" model were anything
other than 220-240V, 50/60Hz (i.e., most of the rest of the world! :-) ). As
someone else pointed out, apparently the "European" models are actually
universal in that they're 100-120V and 220-240V input. Apparently the US is a
big enough market by itself that it's worth the effort to design in a cheaper
US-only power supply... kinda annoying for those of us who travel!

Thanks for the "K" number. The US model is K30238, although from what I've
been able to tell the "full" part numbers are more like QK1-xxxxxxx.

---Joel
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 4:36:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can confirm that my US-model IP3000 has the K30238 PSU.

I suppose that the European model NEEDS to run on 120 or 220, because some
areas in Asia and Europe use 120.
If I was a brave person, I'd swap those PSU's and see if the printers
function, which they should. But I'm not.



"Joel Kolstad" <JKolstad71HatesSpam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11gmib0hfjjl3a@corp.supernews.com...
> Hi Dan,
>
> "Dan G" <Dan@xxxx.com> wrote in message
> news:vM-dnYnk1NIxtZbeRVn-1A@comcast.com...
> > The unit on my UK model IP4000 is: K30235
> > Keep in mind that there are many different types of power in "Europe".
>
> Yeah, but just as the "US" model is 100-120V, 50/60Hz (i.e., Japan and USA
> voltages), I would be really surprised if the "European" model were
anything
> other than 220-240V, 50/60Hz (i.e., most of the rest of the world! :-) ).
As
> someone else pointed out, apparently the "European" models are actually
> universal in that they're 100-120V and 220-240V input. Apparently the US
is a
> big enough market by itself that it's worth the effort to design in a
cheaper
> US-only power supply... kinda annoying for those of us who travel!
>
> Thanks for the "K" number. The US model is K30238, although from what
I've
> been able to tell the "full" part numbers are more like QK1-xxxxxxx.
>
> ---Joel
>
>
August 23, 2005 9:20:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

zakezuke wrote:

>>I have a US model Canon Pixma iP6000d that I'm planning to take overseas with
>>me. In the immediate future, I'll just use a 220V->120V step-down
>>transformer, but I'm noticing that the power supplies on the Pixmas literally
>>snap in and out.
>
>
>>Anyone know?
>
>
> Not off the top of my head, but this is something you can find out on
> your own by hitting the canon website and looking for repair places
> near you, or where you will be. I could check the service manual for
> the mp760 but I don't know if that would be the same, and it's in
> deutch.
>
> The Euro supply is auto switching, the north american one is not. If
> get a euro supply you don't have to switch back. This is what many
> yanks discovered when ordering their Pixmas from overseas, they were
> often included with a simple plug adapter. While I don't have the euro
> service manual for the ip series, I do have one for the mp series and
> those are listed officaly as 100->240v 50 to 60hz.
>


Don't you find that switching from 50Hz / 60Hz you get lines when
printing? This is something like our toaster it has variable voltage /
frequency and we get stripped toast.
August 23, 2005 9:20:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Rob <mesa@mine.com> wrote:
>zakezuke wrote:
>
>>>I have a US model Canon Pixma iP6000d that I'm planning to take overseas with
>>>me. In the immediate future, I'll just use a 220V->120V step-down
>>>transformer, but I'm noticing that the power supplies on the Pixmas literally
>>>snap in and out.
>>
>>
>>>Anyone know?
>>
>>
>> Not off the top of my head, but this is something you can find out on
>> your own by hitting the canon website and looking for repair places
>> near you, or where you will be. I could check the service manual for
>> the mp760 but I don't know if that would be the same, and it's in
>> deutch.
>>
>> The Euro supply is auto switching, the north american one is not. If
>> get a euro supply you don't have to switch back. This is what many
>> yanks discovered when ordering their Pixmas from overseas, they were
>> often included with a simple plug adapter. While I don't have the euro
>> service manual for the ip series, I do have one for the mp series and
>> those are listed officaly as 100->240v 50 to 60hz.
>>
>
>
>Don't you find that switching from 50Hz / 60Hz you get lines when
>printing? This is something like our toaster it has variable voltage /
>frequency and we get stripped toast.

I guess you must be using non-OEM bread.
Best if you use Branded bread from a baker that discloses the formulator and
manufacturer of the flour.
Tony
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 9:20:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <part1of1.1.PdbL0EHuGS9Zmw@ue.ph>, (Tony) wrote:

> >Don't you find that switching from 50Hz / 60Hz you get lines when
> >printing? This is something like our toaster it has variable voltage
> / >frequency and we get stripped toast.
>
> I guess you must be using non-OEM bread.
> Best if you use Branded bread from a baker that discloses the
> formulator and manufacturer of the flour.

ROFL! Excellent!

Jon.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 23, 2005 9:21:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi ZakeZuke,

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1124835499.284567.192970@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> They design them?

Well, I suppose it's more appropriate to say the actual power supply PCB is
specified, although there's some "design" involved in terms of the exact
connectorization, the shape of the plastic housing, etc. But I'm sure you're
correct that the PCB is some generic unit used in many applications besides
Canon's printers.

> PC power supplies typicaly operate on 110 to 220v, been either manual
> switching or auto switching for decades... since 1983 or so since the
> IBM PC was born. There are some exceptions i'm sure, I've just never
> seen any.

The consumer electronics market (which PCs now belong to, although they didn't
back in 1981 when the IBM PC came out) is brutually cost competitive. This is
very evident in printers, where the lower end models are nearly "given" away
at something very close to the manufacturer's cost... and ink sales are used
to provide the profits.

Thanks for the additional information on the part numbers!

---Joel
August 23, 2005 10:56:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Keep in mind that there are many different types of power in
"Europe".

I was under the impression that the power system was almost always 50hz
and 200+v... but the plugs were different among different places, or
specificly different between continental europe with the dual pole
style o o and the UK with it's blade style. One who travels
everywhere could in theory get by with adapters to the pole styles, the
euro plug and the lightly larger south african double or tripple pole,
the dual bade one pole styles of America, the larger dual blade one
earth right angle blade of the uk, and the dual -45 +45 angle blade
style of mainland china, australia, and new zealand and be pretty much
covered. Such a thing exists in a single cube

http://www.giftsforprofessionals.com/92599953-gp5.html

The yank plug tilts to it the oz style, everything else rotates.
Spendy at $20 considering it does no coversion but handy, well unless
you have the UK plug and want to jack into something else, then it's
not so handy, only accepts equipment with either euro plug or US bade.
August 24, 2005 9:11:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

zakezuke wrote:
> > Keep in mind that there are many different types of power in
> "Europe".
>
> I was under the impression that the power system was almost always 50hz
> and 200+v... but the plugs were different among different places, or
> specificly different between continental europe with the dual pole
> style o o and the UK with it's blade style. One who travels
> everywhere could in theory get by with adapters to the pole styles, the
> euro plug and the lightly larger south african double or tripple pole,
> the dual bade one pole styles of America, the larger dual blade one
> earth right angle blade of the uk, and the dual -45 +45 angle blade
> style of mainland china, australia, and new zealand and be pretty much
> covered. Such a thing exists in a single cube
>
> http://www.giftsforprofessionals.com/92599953-gp5.html
>
> The yank plug tilts to it the oz style, everything else rotates.
> Spendy at $20 considering it does no coversion but handy, well unless
> you have the UK plug and want to jack into something else, then it's
> not so handy, only accepts equipment with either euro plug or US bade.
>

There is a universal converter for plugs.

You will find in most motels/hotels in the bathroom the wall socket that
take all configurations
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 24, 2005 9:11:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Rob" <mesa@mine.com> wrote in message
news:430c1d9e$0$15511$61c65585@un-2park-reader-02.sydney.pipenetworks.com.au...
> There is a universal converter for plugs.

Are you thinking of the sockets that have a pair of vertical blades with
little round holes beside them? That covers the US, Japan, China, and most of
Western Europe (a very large percentage of travelers, I expect), but Great
Britain and Oz are left out.

There are the truly universal sockets that are kinda bulky and have about a
half dozen different holes and slots, but I've never seen one in a motel --
only as an adapter plug for travelers.

---Joel
!