Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Overclocking a Celeron 700 66FSB

Last response: in CPUs
Share
September 10, 2006 7:12:44 PM

I have a Celeron 700 in a Dell i810E motherboard running at 66FSB. The memory is PC-100 and the board is rated for 66/100/133FSB. I'd like to try turning the FSB up to 100 which would result in a chip speed of 1050 with its 10.5 multiplier, as well as the memory running at full speed.

How can I do this? There is nothing related in the BIOS. Should I try to flash the BIOS to an Intel version instead of Dell's? There are one set of pins on the board. There are three of them, two are currently jumpered, and they are labeled BIOS SETTINGS along with J something something. I can take another look for the exact label if necessary.
September 10, 2006 7:40:20 PM

Try pinmodding.
September 10, 2006 7:46:26 PM

Do you have a good link on pinmodding?

Also, let me know if I should try another BIOS or if the pins on my motherboard sound interesting.
Related resources
September 10, 2006 8:00:40 PM

I left that post there so I could update it with information, but I couldn't find anything. I think you might be outta luck... unless you want to strike out and try modding it yourself.

Intel's spec sheets come to mind, that's what I used when I modded my Celeron D socket. Basically, you want to tell the motherboard you have a 100FSB proc.
September 10, 2006 8:25:41 PM

Dell = no overclocking for you!
September 10, 2006 8:31:32 PM

That's not necessarily true, if you fool the motherboard into thinking you have a 100FSB Celeron, it will run it at 100fsb.
September 10, 2006 8:53:46 PM

There are some utility to overclock the fsb through Windows manually. I can't guaranty they are totally safe, but make further check before-hand. It might be your best bet. I would make sure to go realli carefully step by step. This way, if it freeze you would still be able to restart. Go up a notch and do a torture test see if stays sytable. If it won't it'll be OK since starting Windows probably won't crash your system.

Try these: http://www.majorgeeks.com/RightMark_CPU_Clock_Utility_d...

and

http://www.majorgeeks.com/SoftFSB_d434.html (probably not good for you tough since WXP doesn't seem to be supported, still, you can try running it in W98 compatibility mode from the property tab)

If you try it: BE CAREFUL.
September 11, 2006 4:40:28 AM

If you're handy with a soldering iron, i'd pinmod.

Please note: the following is a suggestion, any damage you do to anything is your own fault

ass-covering aside, you want this:
http://www.intel.com/design/celeron/datashts/243658.htm
and you want pages 97 and 121.

The BSEL[1:0] pins tell the motherboard what frequency to run the FSB at. A quick read says that to operate the FSB at 100MHz, the BSEL0 pin must be =1, ie, tie it to the positive rail (but before you touch anything, better check which rail, page23).

Also, to prevent shorting +ve to ground through the cpu, either insulate the pin, by taking off the socket lid and using a 1*2mm piece of electrical tape, or cut the pin off (hard to do, without some damn small side-cutters).

Having a jumper or switch to select between +ve and ground will make it easy to select between 66 and 100FSB, but make sure you've got enough space between your mobo and case, as everything will have to be soldered on the underside (and lets you go back to "normal" 66fsb if 100 doesn't work.)

even so, it may not work, as you probably can't up the Core Vcc in the bios (although you can pinmod them too, pages 126, 20), and it's gets more complicated still...

and handy hint number 392: COOL IT WELL. but i'm sure you knew that already.
September 11, 2006 4:47:01 AM

Ask and you shall receive: :D 



keep in mind this view is "through" the processor, so you're actually looking from the top, through the CPU, and viewing the pins on the other side, sort of like an x-ray. The pins of interest are BSEL[0] and BSEL[1]. On the Celeron 66 MHz fsb, both are "low" or zero (0), meaning they have voltage. For the 100 fsb, BSEL[0] must be set to "high" or one (1), meaning no voltage (disconnected) All you have to do to make BSEL [0] go from a 0 to a 1 is to cover up that pin. Since socket 370 uses pretty large pins, nail polish are that brush-on electrical tape would work great. Once you isolate BSEL[0], power up the computer to see if it boots. If not, you may need to up the vcore to give the CPU more voltage to remain stable at 1.05 GHz. Since you're on a Dell board, the only way to up the vcore is to play with the VID0-VID4 pins on the CPU. I can post a reply on VID pin modding if needed. good luck

Joe
September 11, 2006 5:00:10 AM

Here's the trick I used on my S478 chips:

Use a nail polish inside a metal mechanical pencil lead guide and use it to coat the CPU pin with insulation.
September 11, 2006 5:14:07 AM

That's a great tip. Thanks for sharing!

I suppose I'll share my pin mod trick for socket 478:

I went to radio shack and purchased a spool of 30 gauge wire wrap for ~$3. I don't want the wire, but the insulation on the wire is a PERFECT fit for the CPU pins on the socket 478 cpus. I use a pocket knife or scissors to cut the insulation off the wire, then once I have just the insulation, I grab it by inserting a needle into one of the ends on the insulation, then I can use the needle to guide the CPU pin into the other end of the insulation. It makes for a durable yet easily removable pin mod that leaves no evidence behind if I ever decide to sell of the processor later on.

My pin mod for socket 775:
This was just too easy. Without the pins, it's like working on a Pentium II! All I did was cut out a very small square of invisible tape, grab it using a needle, and then directed it onto the small circle I wish to isolate on the 775 pin landing. Like I said, too easy. :lol:  This is why my Pentium D 805 runs at 1.125 volts and consumes 58 watts (according to the extreme PSU calculator).
September 11, 2006 5:19:17 AM

Haha, LGA775 takes all the challenge out of pinmodding!
September 11, 2006 6:00:21 AM

Oh yes! You know, I started a thread at overclock.net too and all I got was Dell=nooverclock. Nice forum.

Please post info on increasing the voltage if you can. I'm going to give this a try ASAP.
September 11, 2006 7:05:21 AM

Wow!! Great tip
a b à CPUs
September 11, 2006 8:38:05 AM

The coppermine core tops out usually at ~950, thats with a decent motherboard with overclocking options.

Quote:
I have a Celeron 700 in a Dell i810E motherboard running at 66FSB. The memory is PC-100 and the board is rated for 66/100/133FSB. I'd like to try turning the FSB up to 100 which would result in a chip speed of 1050 with its 10.5 multiplier, as well as the memory running at full speed.

How can I do this? There is nothing related in the BIOS. Should I try to flash the BIOS to an Intel version instead of Dell's? There are one set of pins on the board. There are three of them, two are currently jumpered, and they are labeled BIOS SETTINGS along with J something something. I can take another look for the exact label if necessary.
September 11, 2006 11:50:33 AM

It's very unlikely to run it @ FSB 100. I have a 633MHz Celeron and looking for a board to try it for 950 but from the reviews I have seen:
The 600MHz is the OCing toy of the coppermine celerons; most of them run @ 100MHz FSB on stock voltage.
With the 633 and 667 versions you've got a chance of bout 50-50 even with voltage increase and much less chance with a 700MHz version. Your board or bios will give you only the option of 66, 100 and 133 MHz given the Intel chipset so read the documentation and find out how to se the FSB to 100.

You won't even have a chance of slightly increasing the voltage but good luck!
September 11, 2006 11:59:10 AM

Any trick to lower the stock vcore of a S939 cpu?
September 12, 2006 3:42:39 AM

I tried to cover the BSEL[0] pin in electrical tape but it always ended up poking through the tape after I seated the CPU. It doesn't seem like there's any way around that. Then I tried to cover it in fingernail polish with the mechanical pencil trick. That pencil is a perfect fit, but that doesn't seem to be working either. The following Linux command:

cat /proc/cpuinfo

is reporting:

cpu MHz : 697.899

The pins seems like a really tight fit in the holes. I think the fingernail polish is just being scraped off. I do think I've got the right pin. I understand what you're saying with the pins being on the other side of the chip in the diagram.

Any ideas?
September 12, 2006 4:09:28 AM

You know, looking at the diagram I posted, I notice that it says "pin side view". It may be that this diagram is showing the actual pin grid array, and is not a see-through image like the other Intel pinout diagrams. All the new ones say "pin out diagram - top view". Apparently, this is not like the newer diagrams. Try performing the pinmod by looking at the diagram as a "bottom view". Here's the full pic to help you get oriented. Sorry about the misinformation earlier. :lol: 



Try the nail polish trick again, this time on the correct pin. Hopefully it works. I'm really busy studying right now, but I'll get around to writing up a pin mod how-to for the vid pins soon. If one of you other expert pinmodders want to do it, go ahead. :wink:
September 12, 2006 7:34:39 AM

I'm having the same results when insulating that other pin.

Unfortunately, I think I'm going to bow out. My system is acting very strange now for some reason.
September 12, 2006 7:40:48 AM

Quote:
I'm having the same results when insulating that other pin.

Unfortunately, I think I'm going to bow out. My system is acting very strange now for some reason.
I tried the nail-polish trick...years ago on a Celeron Tualatin.....same result, nail polish scraped off.
June 26, 2009 11:50:44 AM

Hey guys, sorry to reopen this old thread. But I've read through this whole thread, but I am not sure if this mod applies to the celeron 700. Also can anyone post a diagram or pictures of pins to connect up to either get to a certain FSB speed or Volt?

Thanks.
!