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Interesting Intel article from 5 years ago

Last response: in CPUs
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September 11, 2006 12:48:45 AM

I just came across this old article from June,2001 stating Intel has been working on 45nm a lot longer than I realized...

"These transistors -- featuring structures just 20 nanometers (nm) in size -- will allow Intel to build microprocessors containing a billion transistors, running at speeds approaching 20 gigahertz and operating at less than one volt in approximately 2007."

"These transistors will be the basis of Intel's 45 nanometer (0.045-micron) process generation, which the company plans to have in production in approximately 2007."

To bad the 20ghz prediction is slightly off - :cry: 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/0106120706...
September 11, 2006 1:38:25 AM

Hmm... well I do know that in like 2003 (please correct me if I'm wrong) but Intel made a 10GHz CPU. Now it probably ate up a TON of power but it's possible that they could make a 20GHz CPU. It just might eat up more power than a prescott!
September 11, 2006 3:15:09 AM

Damn 20Ghz, i'd never have to turn the furnace in winter. JK. :lol: 

Well even if they can do 10Ghz by 1015 i'd be floored.
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September 11, 2006 3:55:17 AM

One thing to take into consideration is that around that time ( if memory serves me right), mhz was more important that anything else.

Now, architecture, how much cache and some other things are more important. They probably couldn't take all those things into consideration 5 years ago.

What was around in 2001, PIII? Maybe the conroe or the core 2 quadro is comparable to a PIII @ 20 ghz? :lol: 

Who knows, although its funny to think about.
September 11, 2006 4:47:34 AM

Well considering the recently tested kentsfield is running at 4 x 2.67 ghz = 10.68 Ghz combined, or the overclocked 3.33 x 4 = 13.32 ghz we are getting close to 20 ghz computing power. If moores law holds true within the next 18 months, with 45 nm we should be at something around 25 ghz combined computing power.

Not to mention 1 Mhz today does much more work than 1 Mhz did 5 years ago. If the current generation kentsfield does 40% more work than equivilently clocked p4's then 13.32 ghz *1.4 = 18.68 ghz equivilent processing capabilities, and thats just on 65 nm.
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September 11, 2006 5:04:58 AM

Quote:
I just came across this old article from June,2001 stating Intel has been working on 45nm a lot longer than I realized...

"These transistors -- featuring structures just 20 nanometers (nm) in size -- will allow Intel to build microprocessors containing a billion transistors, running at speeds approaching 20 gigahertz and operating at less than one volt in approximately 2007."

"These transistors will be the basis of Intel's 45 nanometer (0.045-micron) process generation, which the company plans to have in production in approximately 2007."

To bad the 20ghz prediction is slightly off - :cry: 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/0106120706...


20ghz is sort of right in a way, a 45nm Core 2 Duo with a little more cache, IMC and new FSB (aswell as the standard higher clock speeds, perhaps in the end ~4ghz) will perform like a 20ghz P4 cpu.
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