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How to turn off "Low disk space" popup?

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Anonymous
November 8, 2004 7:19:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

How can I permanently turn off the "Low disk space" popup that says "You are
running out of disk space ..."?

Thanks,
Don Culp
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 4:24:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Why would you not want to be warned that you are about to run out of
storage? Is the message spurious? If it the warnings are valid, why would
you not want to take steps to increase storage space?

"Don Culp" <dculp@krell-engineering.com> wrote in message
news:o W5i9NXxEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> How can I permanently turn off the "Low disk space" popup that says "You
> are
> running out of disk space ..."?
>
> Thanks,
> Don Culp
>
>
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 7:53:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Because when I'm downloading, I'm aware of how much space I have left, and I
want to squeeze as much on to my hdd without the annoyance.

my 2cw



"Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> wrote in message
news:u23hCEdxEHA.2620@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Why would you not want to be warned that you are about to run out of
> storage? Is the message spurious? If it the warnings are valid, why
would
> you not want to take steps to increase storage space?
>
> "Don Culp" <dculp@krell-engineering.com> wrote in message
> news:o W5i9NXxEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > How can I permanently turn off the "Low disk space" popup that says "You
> > are
> > running out of disk space ..."?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Don Culp
> >
> >
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 7:53:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

You should leave at least 10% of your hard drive free for the operating
system to use for temp files and defragmentation. Filling it to the brim
will lead to unneccesary hard drive activity and wear and tear.

"My PC" <someone@not.here> wrote in message
news:p 8hkd.30946$K7.30908@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Because when I'm downloading, I'm aware of how much space I have left, and
> I
> want to squeeze as much on to my hdd without the annoyance.
>
> my 2cw
>
>
>
> "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:u23hCEdxEHA.2620@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Why would you not want to be warned that you are about to run out of
>> storage? Is the message spurious? If it the warnings are valid, why
> would
>> you not want to take steps to increase storage space?
>>
>> "Don Culp" <dculp@krell-engineering.com> wrote in message
>> news:o W5i9NXxEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > How can I permanently turn off the "Low disk space" popup that says
>> > "You
>> > are
>> > running out of disk space ..."?
>> >
>> > Thanks,
>> > Don Culp
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 11:36:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> skrev i melding
news:uHDD9PuxEHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> You should leave at least 10% of your hard drive free for the operating
> system to use for temp files and defragmentation. Filling it to the brim
> will lead to unneccesary hard drive activity and wear and tear.

Not everybody uses a configuration where C: is the only hard drive
partition. I have several partitions with no system files, temp files and
where fragmentation is not an issue. I see no reason whatsoever why you
should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right up to the brim and
then some.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 11:36:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

My PC speaks of his HDD in the singular.

"André Gulliksen" <andre.gulliksen@start.no> wrote in message
news:2vdukvF2jajofU1@uni-berlin.de...
> "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> skrev i melding
> news:uHDD9PuxEHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>> You should leave at least 10% of your hard drive free for the operating
>> system to use for temp files and defragmentation. Filling it to the brim
>> will lead to unneccesary hard drive activity and wear and tear.
>
> Not everybody uses a configuration where C: is the only hard drive
> partition. I have several partitions with no system files, temp files and
> where fragmentation is not an issue. I see no reason whatsoever why you
> should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right up to the brim and
> then some.
>
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 5:10:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

In news:2vdukvF2jajofU1@uni-berlin.de,
André Gulliksen <andre.gulliksen@start.no> typed:


> I see no reason whatsoever
> why you should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right
> up to
> the brim and then some.


Although I don't necessary agree, I at least understand what
"right up to the brim" means. But I'm having a hard time with
"and then some." Please explain.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 8:27:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sorry, my 40 Gig HDD is divided into four 10 Gig partitions, my C drive has
always 50% free.


"Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> wrote in message
news:o MxFLrvxEHA.1400@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> My PC speaks of his HDD in the singular.
>
> "André Gulliksen" <andre.gulliksen@start.no> wrote in message
> news:2vdukvF2jajofU1@uni-berlin.de...
> > "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> skrev i melding
> > news:uHDD9PuxEHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> >> You should leave at least 10% of your hard drive free for the operating
> >> system to use for temp files and defragmentation. Filling it to the
brim
> >> will lead to unneccesary hard drive activity and wear and tear.
> >
> > Not everybody uses a configuration where C: is the only hard drive
> > partition. I have several partitions with no system files, temp files
and
> > where fragmentation is not an issue. I see no reason whatsoever why you
> > should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right up to the brim
and
> > then some.
> >
>
>
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 3:03:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> skrev i melding
news:o iG7rm2xEHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>> I see no reason whatsoever
>> why you should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right up to
>> the brim and then some.

> Although I don't necessary agree, I at least understand what "right up to
> the brim" means. But I'm having a hard time with "and then some." Please
> explain.

Well, that part was not really supposed to be taken literally ;o) But since
you asked: There is no harm in filling the cup until it spills over, i.e.
you get an error that the partition is full. That is, you may lose your
download or whatever file you are trying to store there, but the system
suffers no damage or instability.
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 3:03:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

It can cause the system to operate poorly if the OS is attempting a file
operation with only fragmentary space available. XP does not check for
"next available disk" when trying to complete a task.

"André Gulliksen" <andre.gulliksen@start.no> wrote in message
news:2vjjidF2m7t36U1@uni-berlin.de...
> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> skrev i melding
> news:o iG7rm2xEHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>>> I see no reason whatsoever
>>> why you should not be allowed to fill storage partitions right up to
>>> the brim and then some.
>
>> Although I don't necessary agree, I at least understand what "right up to
>> the brim" means. But I'm having a hard time with "and then some." Please
>> explain.
>
> Well, that part was not really supposed to be taken literally ;o) But
> since you asked: There is no harm in filling the cup until it spills over,
> i.e. you get an error that the partition is full. That is, you may lose
> your download or whatever file you are trying to store there, but the
> system suffers no damage or instability.
>
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 7:57:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Colin Barnhorst wrote:
> It can cause the system to operate poorly if the OS is attempting a
> file operation with only fragmentary space available. XP does not
> check for "next available disk" when trying to complete a task.

In my post I mentioned storage partitions, i.e. partitions where you don't
have any system files, temp files, pagefiles and preferably no folders
needed by running programs. These partitions can for instance be filled with
media files or program installation files. Installation files are rarely
accessed, and media files generally do not require very fast access, meaning
that even if files are fragmented it is not really a big problem.

Personally I have a relatively small C:. If this is filled more than 80% I
take steps to either clean it up or expand it. I also have a larger D: where
I store program files. I also try to keep some free space on this, but not
as strictly as C:. I also have E:, F: and G:, which I have no reservation in
filling all the way up.
Anonymous
November 21, 2004 2:49:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

With the prices of hard disk today, it is never a bad idea to have a second
one. Also, mail-in rebates are very common around christmas, and if you
check Best-Buy and Circuit City ads weekly, I guarantee you will find good
deals (at least on the east coast). I know someone will probably reply
telling me how mail-in rebates are a piece of junk, because they cause
headaches and they never seem to get there money back, but if they cause a
problem by not giving you your money from the rebate back, then call the
company and complain (assuming you sent your rebate and receipt in time,) and
they will give you your money back.

Try these links:

http://www.circuitcity.com/ssm/Western-Digital-Internal...

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/catOid/-12976/N/2001296...




"André Gulliksen" wrote:

> Colin Barnhorst wrote:
> > It can cause the system to operate poorly if the OS is attempting a
> > file operation with only fragmentary space available. XP does not
> > check for "next available disk" when trying to complete a task.
>
> In my post I mentioned storage partitions, i.e. partitions where you don't
> have any system files, temp files, pagefiles and preferably no folders
> needed by running programs. These partitions can for instance be filled with
> media files or program installation files. Installation files are rarely
> accessed, and media files generally do not require very fast access, meaning
> that even if files are fragmented it is not really a big problem.
>
> Personally I have a relatively small C:. If this is filled more than 80% I
> take steps to either clean it up or expand it. I also have a larger D: where
> I store program files. I also try to keep some free space on this, but not
> as strictly as C:. I also have E:, F: and G:, which I have no reservation in
> filling all the way up.
>
>
>
!