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what is the best format of audio music ? mp3??

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September 12, 2006 5:55:17 AM

all my music is in mp3 format
what format is the best quality?
how to convert in the best format?

and how to play @24/192 :roll:

More about : format audio music mp3

September 12, 2006 6:14:56 AM

Quote:
all my music is in mp3 format
what format is the best quality?
how to convert in the best format?

and how to play @24/192 :roll:


"Best" is a relative term. If best to you means perfect quality (lossless) with good compression then I suggest you check out Monkey Audio at http://www.monkeysaudio.com/

Unlike many other formats it is lossless which has quite a few important advantages compared to lossy formats such as MP3 and/or MP3Pro.

HTH.
September 12, 2006 6:35:24 AM

Quote:
and how to play @24/192

As i know, you must have a soundcard which support 24 bit and don't forget to press play on the player.

Quote:
what format is the best quality?

MP3, AAC, Ogg, WMA and your ears.

Quote:
how to convert in the best format?

Easy, click click click...wait...done.

:lol: 
Related resources
September 12, 2006 6:43:57 AM

From what I understand, you can't convert .mp3 files to lossless/better format. You can do the conversion, but because .mp3 loses information in the encoding, you won't have the missing information when you convert to lossless. For better sound, convert the original cds to lossless, skip the .mp3 step.

My question is what makes you ask the question?
September 12, 2006 12:29:51 PM

Quote:
all my music is in mp3 format
what format is the best quality?
how to convert in the best format?

and how to play @24/192 :roll:




m4a! :roll: @ 320 bips!


easiest? rip with Winamp CDs from wave to m4a!! :twisted:

M4A is the new replacement for the older MP3 audio format and includes many enhancement and improvements. Many popular applications and hardware devices already support M4A. The m4a
is dedicated to helping you learn more about M4A and MP4 audio files. Hopefully you will begin to use this popular, new audio file format.



Many people have questions about M4A, since it is relatively new. M4A stands for MPEG 4 Audio, and it is a popular file extension used to represent audio files.

Most people are familiar with MP3 and how it shrinks down the file size of songs and other audio files. M4A and MP4 do the same thing as MP3 does, but even better.

Quality is better and file sizes are usually smaller than MP3 files.
But unlike MP3, no licenses or payments are required to be able to stream or distribute content in M4A format (unlike MP3 which requires you to pay royalties on content you distribute in MP3 format).

This fact alone, is more than enough reason (due to the extreme cost savings) to use M4A files instead of MP3 files.

In addition, M4A files tend to sound much better than MP3 files encoded at the same bitrate.
September 12, 2006 1:21:41 PM

Quote:
all my music is in mp3 format
what format is the best quality?
how to convert in the best format?

and how to play @24/192 :roll:




m4p! :roll: @ 320 bips!

easiest? rip with Winamp CDs from wave to m4p!! :twisted:

LOL .M4P is the extension 4 protected AAC u get from itunes
September 12, 2006 2:52:17 PM

Try FLAC...It was one of the first lossless compression schemes. It is also supported by some MP3 players, I know IAudio supports it, not sure about Creative Zen players.
September 12, 2006 3:17:21 PM

VBR MP3 is an ideal format for a couple of reasons. Firstly, if you use the highest quality setting of the ripper, the sound quality can be excellent and secondly, the file sizes are reasonable - a consideration if you want to listen to your music on a portable player.

I use a program called "Easy CD-DA Extractor" and created my own custom preset for ripping. I use VBR, Highest Quality, Joint Stereo and I turned off the high and low pass filtering to preserve as much quality as the format allows. I'm pretty fussy about audio quality yet I'm very happy with the fidelity of the resulting files.

If you are ripping CDs to use with a portable player, do yourself a favour and get a good pair of headphones. They will help to wring the most out of your player and your music, compressed though it may be. My personal favourite - Koss PortaPro ~ $50 US. The SportaPro ( ~ $30) is a good choice if you're on a tight budget. Koss offers a no-questions-asked lifetime warranty on its products. I can vouch for the service. My 1995 vintage PortaPro developed a buzzing sound in one of the speakers last year after a friend cranked my player to the max while listening to a very bassy passage. The bass was already elevated a few dB for low volume listening and it must have been too much for the speaker. I sent the headphones back to Koss along with $6 P&H and received a new pair of headphones a couple of weeks later. The kicker - one hinge (they fold up too) was broken and cemented into position, but Koss replaced the phones despite the obvious physical damage to the product. That's good service, in my opinion
September 13, 2006 12:04:57 AM

Successor to mp3, m4a (M4A) is the new replacement for the older MP3 audio format and includes many enhancement and improvements.

MPEG Layer 4 audio. A fileformat generally used with music files that is higher in quality for about the same filesize.

Files ending in .m4a are audio content only, .mp4 can contain both audio and video, .m4v are video files.

Within AAC are different encoding types, LC (low complexity), HE (high efficiency) to name a few. To encode your audio to be compatible with most audio players, use the LC compression type (used as default by this encoder). High Efficiency (HE AAC) uses SBR technology (not too different as mp3PRO) if the player knows about HE the extra frequency information can be decoded, otherwise half the audio quality will be missing on playback.

A newer standard again for ultra low bitrates is AAC+ or AAC HEv2, this uses parametric stereo for even lower bitrates, dBpowerAMP is able to decode every AAC type (excluding iTunes m4p protected).

db power amp

Apple supplies protected mp4 files in a .m4p format from its online audio store (whilst dBpowerAMP cannot decode these see Forum for details on fair use). Files ending in .aac are raw audio files.


Many popular applications and hardware devices already support M4A. The m4a
[/img]


Many people have questions about M4A, since it is relatively new. M4A stands for MPEG 4 Audio, and it is a popular file extension used to represent audio files.

Most people are familiar with MP3 and how it shrinks down the file size of songs and other audio files. M4A and MP4 do the same thing as MP3 does, but even better.

Quality is better and file sizes are usually smaller than MP3 files.
But unlike MP3, no licenses or payments are required to be able to stream or distribute content in M4A format (unlike MP3 which requires you to pay royalties on content you distribute in MP3 format).

This fact alone, is more than enough reason (due to the extreme cost savings) to use M4A files instead of MP3 files.

In addition, M4A files tend to sound much better than MP3 files encoded at the same bitrate.


What does M4A stand for?
Many people have questions about M4A, since it is relatively new. M4A stands for MPEG 4 Audio, and it is a popular file extension used to represent audio files. Most people are familiar with MP3 and how it shrinks down the file size of songs and other audio files. M4A and MP4 do the same thing as MP3 does, but even better. Quality is better and file sizes are usually smaller than MP3 files. But unlike MP3, no licenses or payments are required to be able to stream or distribute content in M4A format (unlike MP3 which requires you to pay royalties on content you distribute in MP3 format). This fact alone, is more than enough reason (due to the extreme cost savings) to use M4A files instead of MP3 files. In addition, M4A files tend to sound much better than MP3 files encoded at the same bitrate.
What is the difference between M4A and MP4 files? I am a bit confused.
This is the most popular question we get and seems to cause the most confusion to people new to MPEG 4 Audio. The existance of 2 different file extensions that can be used to represent MPEG 4 Audio files is unfortunate. MP4 files may or may not contain MPEG 4 Audio. If you see a M4A file you always know that it contains only MPEG 4 Audio<. MP4 can be used for MPEG 4 video files, combined video and audio files, or just plain MPEG 4 audio. Apple Computer started using and popularizing the M4A file extension to denote the file was an unprotected (non digital rights management) MPEG 4 Audio file. They did this because MP4 was too general (video, video/audio or audio) and might confuse some media players. Now MPEG 4 Audio has its own file extensions, M4A, to avoid any possible problems with being confused with video files. It is recommended that you use the .m4a file extension rather than .mp4 on your audio files. Up until recently, there was much confusion among MP4/M4A encoder and player software. Some programs (Nero, Compaact) used .mp4 while others (WinAmp 5.02, Apple iTunes, iPod) used .m4a to denote MPEG 4 Audio files. Most software developers have now enabled a user selectable option in their software to allow you to choose the default file extension you wish to use to save MPEG 4 Audio files with. Almost all audio players will now play back files using either the .m4a or .mp4 file extension for maximum compatibility. After all, both the .m4a and .mp4 container file formats are the same, they just have different file extensions. If your software program doesn't recognize your file extension, you can rename the file extension to the other one (i.e. m4a or mp4) and it should work.

What are .AAC files? Should I save files with the .AAC file extension or .M4A?
AAC stands for Advanced Audio Coding and is the "backbone" behind both the MPEG 2 and MPEG 4 audio file formats. MPEG 4 Audio files contain (have encapsulated in them) AAC audio streams. Basically .AAC files are audio files that are not contained in a MPEG 4 Audio container file. They are the raw "building blocks" that are used to make up M4A/MP4 files. The use or distribution to others of .AAC files is not recommended as there is not a "tagging standard" for them. Based on the opinions of audio professionals we have received, you should always save your MPEG 4 Audio files in a container file and use either the .m4a or .mp4 file extension. Plain audio .AAC files are not designed to contain song/album information like .m4a files can. Many players (such as Nero, Apple iTunes, iPods) will refuse to play .AAC files. To avoid these problems, always save your audio files to .m4a or .mp4 format instead.

Transcoding?
How best to convert audio files from MP3 to M4A/MP4 format?
Don't do it using MP3s! Transcoding is the process of converting audio files from one format to another. Since many people have their audio files stored as MP3 files, this is a very common question. MP3 is a lossy compression codec (algorithm) that "tosses away" some of the original audio information when a MP3 file is created (encoded). MPEG 4 Audio is a much better encoder than MP3 is (quality-wise and resulting file size-wise). The problem is that going from one lossy audio format to another introduces even more loss in the conversion process (transcoding process). It is the advice of audio experts to never transcode from MP3 to M4A. The loss and distortion is not recommended. Instead, use your .WAV master audio files, re-rip the master audios from your audio CDs or use your audio files that are stored in a lossless audio file format such as FLAC or APE. There are many programs available that can convert from a lossless audio file (or audio CD) to a pristine sounding MPEG 4 Audio file (M4A or MP4). See the list below to locate many free and commercial M4A/MP4 encoding applications.

What About Microsoft's WMA and WMAPRO formats? What are they and how do they compare to M4A/MP4 audio?
I don't recommend using WMA. Microsoft has for years promoted their proprietary (i.e. closed) audio formats and codecs. They routinely have changed their encoding routines, sometimes breaking backward player compatibility on some platforms (i.e. when audio files encoded in newer WMA or WMAPRO formats can't be played back on previous/older versions of Windows Media Player or other audio players using older versions of Microsoft's WMA libraries). Using a proprietary standard like WMA that is owned, dictated and maintained by one company (in this case Microsoft) is not a good idea in my opinion. MPEG 4 Audio on the other hand uses an Internationally approved MPEG/ISO standard. This MPEG 4 Audio standard exists to enable your audio files to play properly on multiple platforms and on various hardware and software players for years to come. WMA can't make that statement due to its closed nature.
September 13, 2006 12:45:36 AM

Quote:
Try FLAC...It was one of the first lossless compression schemes. It is also supported by some MP3 players, I know IAudio supports it, not sure about Creative Zen players.


I have a ZEN 20Gb and no, it doesn't support lossless :cry:  The next step up in quality after 320kbps MP3/WMA is WAV goodness. :D  Mind you, the rest of the device kicks ass though.

As for best format?

Quote:
MP3, AAC, Ogg, WMA and your ears.


That basically says it all. If I *MUST* compress, I use ATRAC3, because I still use Hi-MD (still the best SQ!), and it works great for my needs as I hardly, if ever, share my music. For the ZEN I use WMA, as I can't stand MP3.

Also, as 4745454b wrote, you're wasting your time trying to upscale a song to a higher bitrate; the SQ won't improve and you'll just waste space so if you want a higher bitrate, buy the CD (DVD-CD/SACD) and go from there.
September 13, 2006 1:20:26 AM

Well... looks like a bunch of people beat me to it...

For a portable player you're going to need a compressed file such as .m4a

If space isn't an issue... maybe .wav? That's what I use and it's incredible if you have the right settings on your speakers (not to mention a good sound card and ear).

If not... try a bunch of lossless formats and some good headphones. You can ruin ANY sound with bad headphones.
September 13, 2006 1:23:26 AM

Quote:
Well... looks like a bunch of people beat me to it...

For a portable player you're going to need a compressed file such as .m4a

If space isn't an issue... maybe .wav? That's what I use and it's incredible if you have the right settings on your speakers (not to mention a good sound card and ear).

If not... try a bunch of lossless formats and some good headphones. You can ruin ANY sound with bad headphones.


u would be mad not to use mp3 i used aac for a little while but almost nothing dap supports it so just used high bitrate mp3
September 13, 2006 1:46:57 AM

I use FLAC and SHN (Shorten), both lossless formats. If I do need to use a compressed format, I use ogg.
September 13, 2006 5:05:21 AM

thanks a lot of relpy

i have imtoo mpeg encoder 3 it can convert to 3gp,3g2,avi.aac,ac3,asf,vob,m4a,mov,mp2,mp3,mp4,mpg,ogg,ra,rm,vob,wav,wma,wmv, @4800,320,5.1

that mp3 is already on my hard disk copy from my friend, if i encode to different format , no improvement, and i can't play .ogg format

more,what is the best/good media player??

thanlk
September 13, 2006 5:28:23 AM

Quote:
thanks a lot of relpy

i have imtoo mpeg encoder 3 it can convert to 3gp,3g2,avi.aac,ac3,asf,vob,m4a,mov,mp2,mp3,mp4,mpg,ogg,ra,rm,vob,wav,wma,wmv, @4800,320,5.1

that mp3 is already on my hard disk copy from my friend, if i encode to different format , no improvement, and i can't play .ogg format

more,what is the best/good media player??

thanlk



if i was to get a mp3 player ild get a new ipod
September 13, 2006 5:58:42 AM

mp3 is horrible sound quality if you have a sound system (home or car) so theres no way its the best... far too much loss...but its fine for generic/low grade speakers and headphones.

I am going to redownload all my cds to my computer using some better audio format... not sure which (because i got tired of listening to the shitty mp3s i burned to CD in my car, original CD is soo much better) so i guess i cant help much, so far from what ive heard .wav
September 13, 2006 3:06:15 PM

Quote:
mp3 is horrible sound quality if you have a sound system (home or car) so theres no way its the best... far too much loss...but its fine for generic/low grade speakers and headphones.


I respectfully disagree, to a point.

MP3 is not the best format under any circumstances, but its sound quality is far from horrible. The settings used to encode an MP3 are critical. Default settings used to encode a WAV to a 128kb MP3 will result in a crummy sounding file. Tweak the ripper to encode at 320kb or use "Extreme" quality and the resulting file will sound excellent. My PC feeds a dedicated 100W amplifier connected to classic JBL studio monitors and if the source file sounds bad, I'm gonna hear it. Encoding as per my earlier post results in files that sound almost indistinguishable from the original. Just to satisfy my curiosity, I converted a WAV to 320kb MP3 and then back to WAV and burned it to a CD along with the uncompressed original. I played the two songs back to back on my car stereo and guess what - there wasn't much of a difference between the two.

If you're an audiophile, this discussion is moot because you're probably not going to fool around with compressed audio in the first place. My comments are intended for the average person who wants to rip his CD collection in order to use his computer as a digital "Jukebox" or to enjoy the music on a portable player.

I know that I'm hammering the point, but it's critical how you encode an MP3.
September 13, 2006 7:36:10 PM

Quote:
mp3 is horrible sound quality if you have a sound system (home or car) so theres no way its the best... far too much loss...but its fine for generic/low grade speakers and headphones.


I respectfully disagree, to a point.

MP3 is not the best format under any circumstances, but its sound quality is far from horrible. The settings used to encode an MP3 are critical. Default settings used to encode a WAV to a 128kb MP3 will result in a crummy sounding file. Tweak the ripper to encode at 320kb or use "Extreme" quality and the resulting file will sound excellent. My PC feeds a dedicated 100W amplifier connected to classic JBL studio monitors and if the source file sounds bad, I'm gonna hear it. Encoding as per my earlier post results in files that sound almost indistinguishable from the original. Just to satisfy my curiosity, I converted a WAV to 320kb MP3 and then back to WAV and burned it to a CD along with the uncompressed original. I played the two songs back to back on my car stereo and guess what - there wasn't much of a difference between the two.

If you're an audiophile, this discussion is moot because you're probably not going to fool around with compressed audio in the first place. My comments are intended for the average person who wants to rip his CD collection in order to use his computer as a digital "Jukebox" or to enjoy the music on a portable player.

I know that I'm hammering the point, but it's critical how you encode an MP3.

Im experienced in the audio world (home/car stereo) but rather weak on my encoding prowess.... since im seeking the max QUALITY how should i rip my music? I have been using iTunes, and have a mp3 player, but itunes max sound for mp3 is 190kb?

So what im wondering is how do i download my music via CD to PC so that there is none to little compression (for burning CDs), and then what is the best way to then take that data and encode it to the higest quality mp3 (for my player)
September 13, 2006 8:16:13 PM

Hey Buckiller,

I use a one-stop shopping approach. There's a nice application out there called "Easy CD-DA Extractor" that costs US $30 that rips, encodes, converts and burns - all from one interface. There is a free version available with fewer bells and whistles - you might want to look into it.

If you want nearly the same functionality for free, try a combination of EAC (Exact Audio Copy) from http://www.exactaudiocopy.org/ and Windows Media Player 10. Use EAC to rips tracks to your hard drive in uncompressed WAV format which you can then burn directly to CD (to make compilation CDs, for example). WMP 10 supports ripping to MP3 - just be sure to change the default ripping format from WMA to the highest quality MP3 bitrate supported. There is a beta version of WMP 11 available that probably works as well as, if not better than version 10.

No matter what program you use to rip your CDs, be sure to explore the options for changing the quality of encoding performed. There's a noticeable improvement in the quality of a 320 bitrate file versus a 160 bitrate file. The better your sound equipment, the more you will notice.
September 13, 2006 8:38:43 PM

This comment is directed to no one...

As I already mentioned, you shouldn't re-encode a 128bit .mp3 to 320, it won't be "true" 320. Take the source info, and encode that at 320. There is something else to remember also.

Some people have mentioned portable players, and what bitrate is best for that. Best is a relative term. Best sound is whatever the highest bitrate is for whatever your player supports. If your player only supports .mp3s, and a max of 192bit, then thats the best sound you can get. From what I've read however, the higher the bitrate, the less play time you get from your batteries.

If you have a portable .mp3 player, rip your music at the best sound quality it supports, whatever that is. This won't be a problem if you have a 20GB+ harddrive based model, but will be an issue if you have a 1GB flash based, as 320bit .mp3s are rather large.

If your doing this as a home [/quote]digital jukebox, then I suggest you experiment. Rip some music at different bitrates, and play them back on whatever speakers your using. Use your own ears, and see what sounds best.
September 14, 2006 12:58:36 PM

Quote:
This comment is directed to no one...

As I already mentioned, you shouldn't re-encode a 128bit .mp3 to 320, it won't be "true" 320. Take the source info, and encode that at 320. There is something else to remember also.


Good point. I have also heard it suggested that one of the ways to get around DRM (Apple's or Microsoft's) is to burn the purchased tracks to CD and then rip the CD to MP3. That doesn't seem like a good idea to me - the original file was compressed in the first place and ripping to MP3 just strips away even more fidelity. It's like making photocopies of photocopies - the quality deteriorates with every generation.
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