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installed a new PSU, strange buzzing sound

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September 12, 2006 6:22:36 PM

Hey guys, i got a new PSU today, 450watts.

I have a problem whereby the PSU (pretty sure its PSU) makes a very quite buzzing sound. Infact, i can only notice it when i put my head close to my PC. Now, the strange part happened when i went to play WoW. I have WoW minimized now and i cant hear the buzzing sound. The second i click on the WoW tab i get a much louder, unhealthy buzzing sound. It is similar to the sound of a fly but a lower pitch. Again, the moment i minimize WoW, or press exit the buzzing sound dies out.

Im seriously confused. At first i thought the 450w was not sufficient for my PC ( amd x2 4400+ 2x1gb DD2 RAM, 2 Sata HDD, 1900xt, Dvd RW, CD RW, floppy disk, TV tuner, Wireless network card, asus sli-deluxe) So i unplugged both my CD/DVD drives but the buzzing still continues. The make of the PSU is FSB.

help pls, thx
September 12, 2006 6:34:40 PM

almost sounds more like a vid card problem

sounds happens when game maximized(vid card working hard)
sound gone when game minimized(vid card not working so hard)

try another vid card if ya have one kickin around....if the sound is still there then you may be right about the PSU
September 12, 2006 7:53:15 PM

its deffo not the gfx card making any noise. It is either the PSU or the CPU or mobo. Is it not the CPU fan or mobo fan tho...so its unlikely. I checked the PSU and it appears they are 18amp rails. i am going to try it out with a different game, because WoW is wierd in many ways...i get a wierd humming sound on my headphones when i play wow which also goes when i minimize
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September 12, 2006 8:19:26 PM

i have onboard sound on the asus-sli deluxe mobo.

and HOLY SHIT, i turned my PC off and i get a buzzing sound until i remove the power cable...i hope your joking about that leaky capacitor. I am using my old PC now just to be safe, i dont wanna get my head blown off while im listening closely to the buzzing.
September 12, 2006 9:02:31 PM

oh man, they are gonna think im taking the piss...so far i have already RMA'd a harddrive, then the whole machine for a faulty motherboard and cathodes lights which didnt work and the PSU i installed i got given today after i RMA'd my old one due to failure !!! Lol

anyway, thanks for the advice mate, in all honesty i would have emailed the company but i would still be using my computer atm. You may have just saved me from some nasty trouble there ;)  thanks friend.
September 12, 2006 9:24:13 PM

They should be happy to do it since if the PSU failed and a capacitor blew, it would probably fry all your parts...
Sounds like their customer service is getting a work out.
September 13, 2006 3:54:58 PM

ok, company told me it to continue using it as they dont think its broken.

From what i see, the PSU makes a buzzing sound whenever my Graphics card goes under strain. Though it does make a buzzing sound all the time, i can only just about hear it. Could this possibly be caused by the fact my graphics card had a 3pin power reciever and i used a 4 pin? I dont think the PSU came with any 3 pins.
September 13, 2006 4:21:28 PM

just had a look inside, they put in a little connector from the graphics card which splits two ways, 3 wires each. I removed it and placed the standard cable in. The buzzing still continues tho its starting to tick me off.

Can i ask u a question, is 450watts enough for:

amd x2 4400+
2x1GB ram sticks
asus sli-deluxe
radeon x1900xt 512mb
2 sata hard drives 200gb each
DVD rw /cd rw combo
DVD Rom drive
Floppy disk drive
Digital TV card
Wireless network card
2 cathode lights
Lights at front of the case.
120mm fan

(nothing overclocked)
September 13, 2006 4:24:31 PM

oh forgot to add, shall i try my PSU out after unplugging some stuff? What can i get away with apart from the DVD/CD drives and one of my harddrives.
September 13, 2006 4:25:15 PM

Quote:
How many amps do you have on the 12v rails?

450w is a good amount of power. You just want to make sure it's providing enough current to power the items. Yo want the 12v rails to have at least 18 amps on each.


im pretty sure there is 18 amps on each
September 13, 2006 4:33:08 PM

Quote:
unfortunatly my computer hear at work won't let me to the sight. So i'll get to it in a few hours when i get home.


np, You've been really helpfull :) 
September 13, 2006 4:43:48 PM

just stabbing in the dark here....but maybe the fan has something touching it ? Theres no wires coming from outside of the PSU box tho =/
September 13, 2006 5:24:55 PM

Sorry, i dont have an antec psu? i have a FSP one. Been messing around with some games and basically

More stress of graphics card = louder buzzing noise.

But buzzing noise is coming from PSU ( i think ) pretty sure its not coming from the GFX card neway
September 13, 2006 5:35:01 PM

ive been looking for it myself. Best i could get was this page

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/acatalog/Sparkle_Power_Su...

i guess i have a similar one , but 450w ( i aint got the fancy blue one :p )

hmm, well the noise does sound electrical, i would say more like what i would hear walking near a powerstation, it also gives the occasional fuzzy click if my game does something fancy.
September 13, 2006 5:48:32 PM

That psu is very weak for ur setup go for a 550w even 600w! those capacitors could have damage themselve due to an overlaod

here is the psu calculator
September 13, 2006 5:59:35 PM

was just reading this

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=16092

listened to his sound clip and to me it sounds exactly the same. He is getting the sound when he plays 3d games, similar to me ( althought i get a very quiet buzz all the time). He changed his graphics card, but still gets the buzz indicating the graphics card was not making the noise. Therefore, maybe my problem is the same as his. Difference being i had no noise, changed my PSU and then had noise.
September 13, 2006 6:00:19 PM

My x1900xt makes buzzing/whining noises unrealted to the fan during CSS.... its weird.
September 13, 2006 6:04:14 PM

go the website i posted . u need at least a 650w psu

may calculation :

1.) assumeing cpu and mb are soket AM2*
2.) therefore ram modules are DDR 2*
3.) 6 usbports and 1 firewire **
4.) no overclock added
5.)no pci cards added
6.) 1x additional pci card ( tv tunner )
7.) no fan controller + no front bay gaggets
8.)100% psu utilization
9.) 15%surge compensation and 20% capacitor aging

total watts aprox: 623w

edit:-

* not specified in ur system specs
** onboard
4.) no pci added -> i'm referring to sound cards/scsi/sata/ide controller cards
September 14, 2006 3:17:34 PM

Getting a new PSU sent, should arrive tomorrow. If buzzing noise does go, then great. If it doesn't i think im going to shoot myself in the head :p 
September 14, 2006 4:11:58 PM

Quote:
almost sounds more like a vid card problem

sounds happens when game maximized(vid card working hard)
sound gone when game minimized(vid card not working so hard)

try another vid card if ya have one kickin around....if the sound is still there then you may be right about the PSU



ohhh..my god...this is the worst answare i have ever heard...
sorry to tell you my friend but you and tech stuff ..don`t mix..

here is the proper answer...the sound you heard cames indeed from the psu..as a matter of fact it`s quite normal.....all the coins forming the transformers inside the psu generate such noise....because of the high frequency comutation current........
well the story is quite long but .. in order to make is short ..i`ll tell you this.....the transformers should have been properly mecanically isolated...

it`s true that when the power consumption increases...the current drawn from the psu increases.....the work load of the psu increases ....so the noise becames stronger.....also the noise hasn`t got a fixed frequency (tonality) ....there are harmonics and also reflections it`s all a matter of accoustics and mecanical oscilations...

i`m afraid there is nothing you can do against this noise it`s simply a matter of mechanical build.......i`ve seen perfectly identical psu units ...but with different sounds caming from them....

you could try to reput the psu unit inside your case ..or try to loose the srews a little bit...

good luck..and excuse the english
September 14, 2006 4:20:34 PM

Quote:
Then you have a leaky capacitor. The PSU is on it's way out and could go out with a bang. This will most definatly ruin most anything plugged into it. Remove it from your system ASAP and RMA it.


capacitors don`t make sounds my friend unless they are about to explode........

when a capacitor is leaking ..or it`s simply broken it has been subjected to either higher voltages than normal (actualy in theory 300% on it`s nominal voltage) or higher temperatures......

normally inside the computer medium most of the capacitors failure occur due to higher temperature...notice that old motherboard do have broken or leaked capacitors arround the cpu heatsink........this is of course not because of the higher voltages..(the computer ..cpu would have blown :D  ) but because of the high temperature ...near the cpu...and of course because of the bad quality of the capacitors....

notice all the new capacitors on modern boards they either have metalic cases (to disipate the heat) or are placed far away from heat sources...



September 14, 2006 4:28:30 PM

i might add that video cards can make sounds too...as a matter of fact anything in the pc with coins attached to can make sounds.....

the video card has it`s own power circuitry and of couse includes little coins to accumulate and distribute energy according to it`s working principle.....

and i once again tell you boys ...capacitors don`t make sounds...coins do....and this is normal ....in a way of speaking .... higher currents are involved so it`s normal.....to a certain limit....
a b ) Power supply
September 14, 2006 5:18:02 PM

Coins in a PSU? :? WTF and why the bold font, are you trying to shout? or is your shift key stuck/caps lock on?

To the the original OP, the other posters who feel its the PSU at fault may well be correct so if the replacement thats on it's way does the same thing when it's fitted send it back, demand a full refund & buy a different brand around the 600W mark I would suggest.
September 14, 2006 5:19:08 PM

just to add to ur long post Fainis :lol: 

as far as i know:
electronic devices don't produce sounds.
it's mechanical device which produce sound.
September 14, 2006 5:33:36 PM

>coins[/quote]

I think he means coils.
a b ) Power supply
September 14, 2006 5:53:44 PM

:lol:  let's hope so dude otherwise I'm gonna have to start feeding cash to my pooters & hope I use the correct currancy :lol:  , Welcome to Windows You have insuffiecent funds available please insert more coins to logon.
September 14, 2006 6:03:19 PM

wtf ?

Transformers is a machanical device and produce some sort of sound !!

but electronic devices don't!
Did u ever Heard ur pendrive, mp3 etc. buzzing when using them ?!!
a b ) Power supply
September 14, 2006 6:37:45 PM

Spot on dude here in the U.K we have a 240 AC power grid and man you wanna hear the racket that comes from the overhead power lines, it's bad enough in the dry but when it's raining the crackling worries the crap out of me and don't get me started on the sub-stations that are always put near to residential areas so that curious/bored kids can have something play with, as for coin-op PC's, a new feature of Vista perhaps :lol: 
September 14, 2006 7:05:21 PM

Quote:
Coins in a PSU? :? WTF and why the bold font, are you trying to shout? or is your shift key stuck/caps lock on?

To the the original OP, the other posters who feel its the PSU at fault may well be correct so if the replacement thats on it's way does the same thing when it's fitted send it back, demand a full refund & buy a different brand around the 600W mark I would suggest.



there were coils ..sorry...
yes...transformers do produce sounds.......in case you didn`t know.....

and for all the others...read all the post ..when you correct samebody you might be missunderstood......read ..excuse my english...samebody realised the mistake done literally...coils not coins....

and for those who did not hear that transformers...coils whatever (damn english :D  ) .. make sounds (oscilations).....read same books ...besides only the readme txt from games directory :D 

transformers..do operate in ac current ..ac meaning variation..oscilation..plus mechanical parts equals sound...capacitors (electrolitic ones) are also build in layers constructed as a coil..but the current is small so the vibration is very small ..imposible to hear by human ear unless it`s defective and about to blow :D 



short reminder for those not in domain:
- inductors (also known as coils (as someone earlier rectiffied me :D  )) work in ac to produce a certain inductance ... the current drawn by these elements is samething like:
Iinductor=Uinductor/Xinductor
where x means inductive reactance
-capacitors work in ac to accumulate a certain energy thus the total amount of energy accumulated is Q=CU
the current drawn is:
Icapacitor=Ucapacitor/Xcapacitor

Xinductor=2*pi*f*L
Xcapacitor=1/2*pi*f*C

lets say f equals 100Khz.. a normal comutation frequency for electronic switches(power CMOSes) inside psu

this means that Xinductor (ohms) is very small and Xcapacitor is very big (also ohms).....

that means that coils (inductors) draw high current..ac current
and capacitors draw small current

an simple example will conclude that a very large current will pass a power coil (inside a transformer)..lets say 10Amps..and a very small current will pass a capacitor ..lets say 10mA....

the mechanical oscilations created by those 10Amps into a coil are much bigger than the mechanical oscilations created by those 10mAmps inside a capacitor......

in fact if a large current is gonna pass through a capacitor that capacitor is gonna shotcut it`s planes and eventually explode (leak)..the result will be a broken capacitor and a defective one also...bla bla bla
bla bla .........etc :D 

did anybady knew that also resistors do also create sounds....although they operate in ac and cc current ..they also have sounds operating in cc curent ..it`s called thermal sound..this damn english .... :D 
September 14, 2006 7:18:08 PM

Quote:
debth exspanation


hehe you`re wellcamed my friend ... no problem
..damn this english...my english is playing games on me at this hour...
imagine ..damn ..did i say coins instead on coils :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 

hyhy but the most important thing is that we have fun ....
...chears....... :D 

:lol:  we rest the case...our english and technical stuff don`t mixt :lol: 

good luck everybady and goooooooood fun.....
a b ) Power supply
September 14, 2006 8:23:24 PM

:)  I was'nt correcting you , merely querying as for your english thats better than a lot of people's in England believe me!, t'was all in jest no offence was ment in my words, oh and mpilchfamily your class A dude, I've seen quite a few of your posts, many words of wisdom imparted to the masses good stuff dude
September 15, 2006 2:07:33 PM

Quote:
:)  I was'nt correcting you , merely querying as for your english thats better than a lot of people's in England believe me!, t'was all in jest no offence was ment in my words, oh and mpilchfamily your class A dude, I've seen quite a few of your posts, many words of wisdom imparted to the masses good stuff dude


chears!...
good luck and have fun!
September 15, 2006 2:56:49 PM

Quote:
wtf ?

Transformers is a machanical device and produce some sort of sound !!

but electronic devices don't!
Did u ever Heard ur pendrive, mp3 etc. buzzing when using them ?!!


Transformers ARE NOT mechancial devices. They are inductive windings wrapped around a common core. The ratio of the number of windings on one side versus the other, determines the amount of step up or step down. They only work on AC, not DC.
September 15, 2006 3:21:27 PM

Quote:
wtf ?

Transformers is a machanical device and produce some sort of sound !!

but electronic devices don't!
Did u ever Heard ur pendrive, mp3 etc. buzzing when using them ?!!


Transformers ARE NOT mechancial devices. They are inductive windings wrapped around a common core. The ratio of the number of windings on one side versus the other, determines the amount of step up or step down. They only work on AC, not DC.

i was refering to their mechanical structure..........
in fact they are electromagnetic devices.........
the energy accumulated inside the core (ferite) (in T seconds, T means the period of the ac current) is transfered into a secondary coil ....
of course the energy is accumulated inside the core through a primary coil


well i agree it works in ac 99% of the cases .....
i can only tell you this there is a special case in which only cc curent can be used ... but the principle used is actually a little trick......
if any of you boys would like to know about that make a little experiment and then repply back...after you get electrocutated :D  8O


the experiment goes like that .... take an old linear transformer ... and a battery...
connect a few volts light tube to the secondary coil....
then simply connect the battery to the primary coil....you`ll notice that the light tube works(emits light)......then the light tube will suddenly stop......at this moment the battery is still connected at the primary wing (coil)..then remove the battery and to your surprise you`ll notice that the light tube emits light again..so the transformer is working ...wtf :D  ..if you connect and deconnect the battery fact enough you`ll notice that the light tube is on permanently (as a matter of fact at least 50 times per second)...now most of you got it :D 

it`s a principle used in car ignition...and other app when a battery is used ....... or same other cc current source......

so the mighty conclusion ........issssssssss.....thaaaaat theeeeeeeee transformer works in variable current :D  ...hyhyhy got you didn`t i

i must admit i have many many many years in advanced electronics ...so ...

good luck
September 15, 2006 3:46:44 PM

Ok guys, installed my new PSU. It is exactly the same model.

I still get everything exactly the same as before. Except that it is much less noisey and i can barely hear it this time. The sound seems like it has a higher frequency as well.

all in all i think everything should be ok providing it doesnt get louder.

Once again, a big thank you to everyone helping me out on this thread.
September 15, 2006 3:49:54 PM

Quote:
wtf ?

Transformers is a machanical device and produce some sort of sound !!

but electronic devices don't!
Did u ever Heard ur pendrive, mp3 etc. buzzing when using them ?!!


Transformers ARE NOT mechancial devices. They are inductive windings wrapped around a common core. The ratio of the number of windings on one side versus the other, determines the amount of step up or step down. They only work on AC, not DC.

i was refering to their mechanical structure..........
in fact they are electromagnetic devices.........
the energy accumulated inside the core (ferite) (in T seconds, T means the period of the ac current) is transfered into a secondary coil ....
of course the energy is accumulated inside the core through a primary coil


well i agree it works in ac 99% of the cases .....
i can only tell you this there is a special case in which only cc curent can be used ... but the principle used is actually a little trick......
if any of you boys would like to know about that make a little experiment and then repply back...after you get electrocutated :D  8O


the experiment goes like that .... take an old linear transformer ... and a battery...
connect a few volts light tube to the secondary coil....
then simply connect the battery to the primary coil....you`ll notice that the light tube works(emits light)......then the light tube will suddenly stop......at this moment the battery is still connected at the primary wing (coil)..then remove the battery and to your surprise you`ll notice that the light tube emits light again..so the transformer is working ...wtf :D  ..if you connect and deconnect the battery fact enough you`ll notice that the light tube is on permanently (as a matter of fact at least 50 times per second)...now most of you got it :D 

it`s a principle used in car ignition...and other app when a battery is used ....... or same other cc current source......

so the mighty conclusion ........issssssssss.....thaaaaat theeeeeeeee transformer works in variable current :D  ...hyhyhy got you didn`t i

i must admit i have many many many years in advanced electronics ...so ...

good luck

So you're saying that my post was incorrect?
September 15, 2006 3:52:08 PM

Quote:
Ok guys, installed my new PSU. It is exactly the same model.

I still get everything exactly the same as before. Except that it is much less noisey and i can barely hear it this time. The sound seems like it has a higher frequency as well.

all in all i think everything should be ok providing it doesnt get louder.

Once again, a big thank you to everyone helping me out on this thread.


man ... how many trillions of times do i have to tell you...it`s perfectly normal with power hungry sistems...
it all cames down with the mechanical build....how good or how poor is the structure assembled in order to eliminate the oscilations created by strong variable currents
September 15, 2006 6:43:37 PM

fainis> The theory of transformers and magnetic fields as taught to you seems a little skewed from what I was taught.

A single straight peice of wire with current going through it will have a magnetic field, if you take that straight piece of wire and wrap it around anything, the field will be amplified due by the amount of windings(turns) around the object. If you add iron or anything ferrous (or ferrite) the magnetic field created by the coil (or windings) will be enhanced or stabilized. Coils have the property of reducing circuit voltage/current oscillations.

A transformer is a device that isolates one circuit from another physically but are linked magnetically. The primary side of a transformer (the input side) is a coil of a certain amount of wire and is not physically connected to the secondary side (the output side). The secondary side is wound around the primary or next to it so that the magnetic field created by the primary coil overlaps the secondary coil. The magnetic field from the primary coil causes the secondary coil to produce a voltage and now you have output.

Something I learned early: a wire moving through a magnetic field with generate electricity= a magnetic field moving around wire will generate electricity.

If you take a small DC electric motor and apply DC voltage to it, it will run (as long as it's not broken), however... if you take that same motor and connect a voltmeter to the motor leads and spin the motor shaft by hand the voltmeter will read a voltage output from the motor. THis is a simple practical demonstration of magnetic-coil theory.
September 15, 2006 6:46:26 PM

Quote:
fainis> The theory of transformers and magnetic fields as taught to you seems a little skewed from what I was taught.

A single straight peice of wire with current going through it will have a magnetic field, if you take that straight piece of wire and wrap it around anything, the field will be amplified due by the amount of windings(turns) around the object. If you add iron or anything ferrous (or ferrite) the magnetic field created by the coil (or windings) will be enhanced or stabilized. Coils have the property of reducing circuit voltage/current oscillations.

A transformer is a device that isolates one circuit from another physically but are linked magnetically. The primary side of a transformer (the input side) is a coil of a certain amount of wire and is not physically connected to the secondary side (the output side). The secondary side is wound around the primary or next to it so that the magnetic field created by the primary coil overlaps the secondary coil. The magnetic field from the primary coil causes the secondary coil to produce a voltage and now you have output.

Something I learned early: a wire moving through a magnetic field with generate electricity= a magnetic field moving around wire will generate electricity.

If you take a small DC electric motor and apply DC voltage to it, it will run (as long as it's not broken), however... if you take that same motor and connect a voltmeter to the motor leads and spin the motor shaft by hand the voltmeter will read a voltage output from the motor. THis is a simple practical demonstration of magnetic-coil theory.


hahaha ..you`re funny dude....the theory of the transformers has 37812637821643726478124671846 pages...step into my office
September 15, 2006 6:58:51 PM

Quote:
:D ING: :D ING:

In this corner we have our fainis. An Addict that has been with us since February of this year.
In this corner we have Blunc. A Newbie that joined this past July.

Ok guys I want to see a clean fight here. Present only facts. Supply links and quote reference books as often as possible. Remember all references have to be verified. Please stick to online links as much as possible.
Ok you know what to do so come out quoting.

:D  :lol: 


:trophy:

look man ...i`ve arround with you from february ....but i`ve been arround from ...19xx..shiet i forgot ..i`m so old...... 8O
September 15, 2006 7:08:39 PM

Quote:
Are you sure its not just one of your cables touching your cpu fan or a case fan?
:trophy:

congratulations man......you have just won the throphy of the day.......
wake up man...........the problem was settled 283718273817 hours ago
a b ) Power supply
September 15, 2006 7:47:32 PM

:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
a c 121 ) Power supply
a b Ý World of Warcraft
September 15, 2006 8:53:52 PM

Transformers often make noise because very typically their cores are not one-piece, but are a stack of laminates; take one apart and it will look like a letter "E" (the coils are wound around the center leg) and then another bar across it to close the magnetic circle, e.g. "E|". The laminates may vibrate against one another, producing that characteristic 60Hz (or 50Hz) hum. The cheaper the transformer, the more poorly it may have been made, allowing greater vibration and noise.
September 15, 2006 9:21:23 PM

I work with a group of engineers that designs head coils for Medical MRI. A MRI is simply a superconducting electromagnet cooled with liquid helium. Its just a long wire wrapped around a core (the hole in the middle) There are no moving parts whatsoever aside from the patient table. But you need to have earplugs AND headset earprotection when you are being scanned because as the current is switched back and fourth it actually "flexes the windings on the core and the clacking that it produces is about 100dB....and again it has no moving parts. Just the harmonics of the stresses put on the wire as current is switching back and fourth.
September 15, 2006 10:15:44 PM

Now I never said fainis was wrong, I merely stated that I was taught transformers and coils differently.

I am very familiar with car ignition systems, having personally worked on over 25000 cars I know a bit how it works. If you didn't have a condenser (an automotive capacitor) in circuit with the breaker points on older car ignitions the primary coil field would no collapse fast enough to give you the 20kv in the secondary windings of the ignition coil to cause the spark to jump across the 0.030 gap on your spark plugs. If you didn't allow the breaker points long enough closed time to build a good field in the primary side of the coil you still would get weak spark. It's quite interesting how a high energy ignition can turn 12 volts into 100kv but that takes a particular type of coil and the proper ignition module.
September 16, 2006 11:52:50 AM

Quote:
Transformers often make noise because very typically their cores are not one-piece, but are a stack of laminates; take one apart and it will look like a letter "E" (the coils are wound around the center leg) and then another bar across it to close the magnetic circle, e.g. "E|". The laminates may vibrate against one another, producing that characteristic 60Hz (or 50Hz) hum. The cheaper the transformer, the more poorly it may have been made, allowing greater vibration and noise.


sure man i agree..but in our case..the psu ...the transformers are made out of ferite .......
fero-silicium....as you described is used in low frequency 50-60hz...
ferite..our case..inside the psu..is used at high frequency....10Khz....and hundreds of Khz.....this explains the buzzing high frequency noise

low frequency op transformers also can make high frequency noises as you described but the most disturbing noise is in low frequency (linear power supplies) as you can hear a huummm low frequency noise (same of the materials surrounding the transformer itself can resonate bla bla bla)

good luck
!