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Weird Reboot Problem...Please Help!

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September 14, 2006 12:20:32 AM

Hey guys, I've been having some very weird random(sort of) reboot problems. The reboots only seem to occur when I am playing videos (so far only divx in particular). I've tried with both WMP(whole system just locks up) and VLC(complete reboot). I haven't really tried to see if games cause the reboots too. I've also run prime95, superPI, and a video card stability test for extended periods with no reboots at all.

Also, as for my ram(see below), I've had to manually bump up the timings/voltage to run at the certified settings (which now result in the DDR18V fail). But, the reboots occured with both the new settings and the defaulted settings.

In my attempts to isolate the problem I have:
-installed latest Nvidia drivers
-flashed the latest BIOS
-installed new onboard audio drivers (dxdiag said the old drivers were not signed, new ones are)

On a side note...a few weeks ago the system failed to start up (i believe it was a short)...the problem seemed to fix itself after I played around with some of the power connectors. The only really change was that the fans were wired in a different order, eliminating the use of one molex(could a molex connector cause a short?). After that the system boots fine, so I dont even know if this might affect anything.

System Specs:
Core 2 Extreme X6800
Gigabyte 965P-DQ6 Mobo w/F4 bios (reboots occured with F2 and F3 also)
Zalman CNPS9500 Cooler
2x1GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2 PC2-6400 CAS3 (Had to manually adjust mobo settings to 3-4-3-9 @2.2v)
XFX Geforce 7950 GX2
WD NeoHE 550w PS
150gb Raptor

Temps:
System: around 49-50C
CPU: around 35C idle; max 46C
GPU: idle around 67C

Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks

More about : weird reboot problem

September 14, 2006 2:05:23 AM

*UPDATE*

Ok...i was just trying to watch a video with VLC, and was doing so successfully for about an hour. Then it rebooted again. After starting to watch the video again, there was another reboot after about 5mins. After the 3rd reboot i tried using WMP instead...this time instead of a reboot the system just shut down, and refused to start again. I unplugged the power cord from the PS a few times. Each time i tried to start it up, i would get a quick flash of the LEDs and fans and then nothing. After about the 5th try it booted. It seems like this definitely isn't a software/driver problem and that the original problem i was having is related and has not been resolved. (BTW...the whole time I was watching the videos, I was also closely monitoring the temps...nothing unusual at all)

Any suggestions ideas? Does this sound like a PS problem? Memory? Mobo?
September 14, 2006 2:10:33 AM

Do you have any additional PCI or PCI Express cards installed other than the video card? Also are you getting your drivers from Gigabyte or directly from the Intel/Realtek/Marvell/Nvidia website?

The reason I ask is because I had issues when I had my Audigy 2 ZS and my ATI TV Wonder Elite connected. The sytem would crash when ever I played games. I removed both cards from system but I suspect the Audigy 2 ZS was the issue. Also my system would have reboot problems as well but updating the drivers from their respective sites seemed to fix my issues. Ever since doing this my system has been rock solid with no issues.

Other things you should check is your temps, RAM, and PSU. Run a few games and see if it restarts with them as well. Finally disable automaticly restart in Windows so if it is driver or memory related it may give you some info to hunt down your problem.

ADD:o OPS! you already answered a few questions while I was responding.
Related resources
September 14, 2006 2:18:11 AM

Quote:
Do you have any additional PCI or PCI Express cards installed other than the video card? Also are you getting your drivers from Gigabyte or directly from the Intel/Realtek/Marvell/Nvidia website?


Nope, the graphics card is the only card installed. I'm still using the onboard sound, ethernet, so I got those drivers from Gigabyte

Graphics drivers are directly from Nvidia

Quote:


The reason I ask is because I had issues when I had my Audigy 2 ZS and my ATI TV Wonder Elite connected. The sytem would crash when ever I played games. I removed both cards from system but I suspect the Audigy 2 ZS was the issue. Also my system would have reboot problems as well but updating the drivers from their respective sites seemed to fix my issues. Ever since doing this my system has been rock solid with no issues.

Other things you should check is your temps, RAM, and PSU. Run a few games and see if it restarts with them as well. Finally disable automaticly restart in Windows so if it is driver or memory related it may give you some info to hunt down your problem.


I've already disabled automatic restart...the reboots happen without a bluescreen

Quote:


ADD:o OPS! you already answered a few questions while I was responding.


Thanks!
September 14, 2006 2:42:29 AM

Unfortunately...another Update


Ok, this time the comp. completely shut down while doing pretty much nothing at all (I was browsing the web). And, now it will not turn on again. Push the power button and nothing happens; every few pushes the fans and LEDs light up. Could it be a short somewhere? (if so where should I look) Could it be the PS???
September 14, 2006 2:45:13 AM

It sounds like it may be PSU or RAM then. The most likely cause is the PSU based on your discription. I read some of the reviews on it and it and it seemed to have a rather high failure rate. Also, I'm thinking the modular cabling may be an issue with making a connection, so be sure to check that out. Here is a similar PSU that has great reviews and a lower failure rate if your looking for a replacement. Also there are no modular cables so there are fewer connection issues. I'm using one in my system with no issues, just have to tie down the excess cable with wire ties. But before you go and replace anything, you should run memtest and try swapping sticks of RAM to isolate the problem.
September 14, 2006 2:55:46 AM

Just another question. Have you reset your BIOS? I did have one issue when I couldn't get the computer to boot so I reset the BIOS. Just be warned after I did this it messed up my RAID array so I had to reinstall Windows. This is just a suggestion if you can't get your computer to power on by trying everything else. BTW, it only messed up the array when I removed the CMOS battery. When I reset the BIOS through the software everything stayed intact.
September 14, 2006 2:55:48 AM

Thanks for your suggestions....If I run Memtest (with both sticks in) and everything passes, does that guarantee that Ram isn't the problem??
September 14, 2006 2:57:31 AM

I haven't really reset it...but I have reflashed it twice when the system seemed to be stable, would that have the same effect?
September 14, 2006 2:57:59 AM

I'm not entirely sure if it is 100% but it does make it seem like your PSU is probabally the issue then.
September 14, 2006 2:59:52 AM

Quote:
I haven't really reset it...but I have reflashed it twice when the system seemed to be stable, would that have the same effect?


To my knowledge it is always recommended to reset the default settings after a BIOS update then go back and customize it afterward.
September 14, 2006 3:08:40 AM

Quote:
I haven't really reset it...but I have reflashed it twice when the system seemed to be stable, would that have the same effect?


To my knowledge it is always recommended to reset the default settings after a BIOS update then go back and customize it afterward.

No, I didn't do that. That can't be causing the problem, right? Either way, I can't get into the BIOS to reset the settings at this point anyway.
September 14, 2006 3:18:53 AM

Most likely no since you were up and running for hours.
September 14, 2006 3:27:56 AM

Quote:
Most likely no since you were up and running for hours.


more than a week actually (minus the reboots)
September 14, 2006 4:28:57 AM

Most likely its the PS as has already been suggested.
Try a new one, make sure its at least a 450 and a decent name brand one at that. You can always return it if that doesnt solve it, or return it and buy one online cheaper.
a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2006 4:30:27 AM

If you are seeing LED's flicker and fans start, and then shutdown, it is power related. The 5V standby is working, but as soon as you push the power button, momentarily you are getting a PS good signal from motherboard, and then as soon the PSU supplies all rails to the motherboard, one or more are loaded down, and PS good is removed causing PSU to shutdown power. I've seen this a few times before. Once it was a fiddly AC patch cord connector at the back of the PSU. When I measured, the PSU was giving the 5VSB, but would not turn on. I removed the ATX connector and shorted pin 13 and 14 (PS ON and GND) and the supply started along with the fans. I replaced the ATX connector and tried again, same thing no POST no fans, nothing. I wiggled the AC patch cord at the back of the supply and it booted. Apparently it was getting enough power to supply the 5VSB, but not enough to supply all rails under load.

Anyway from your description, it is definitely a power problem. If it were RAM or anthing else, the fans, HDD, etc, would still power up. Now I said power not necessarily PSU. You could have a device or connector shorting causing it not to power up. Most supplies have a short circuit protect which will shut the supply down if it determines that one or more rails have an excessive current draw on it/them. Check all your spare connectors and make sure none of the pins have found a way to short to chassis. Most of the connectors will have female pins, but they aren't recessed very far back in the molex connector, so if they're pushed up against a corner they can short. Some fan connectors have a male and female molex connector so they can be jumpered, the male connectors are definitely easier to short. If you have determined that nothing visible is shorting, you can try disconnecting everything but the bare minimum to POST. That means CPU, RAM , video card, motherboard, that's pretty much it. Remove power from everything else (that includes any case fans) and see if it will POST. Now if it does POST, start adding things back in. If after something is added, and it fails POST, it doesn't necessarily mean that's the problem. Remove it and continue adding everything else. If it continues to fail POSTing after increasing the current load, then we can say it's a PSU problem. If you can add everything back but one device, then maybe that device is reason for the excessive current draw. These are the fundamental troubleshooting steps I would use to determine if it is a PSU problem or a failed/failing device causing the supply to go into short circuit protect.

EDIT: One other thing it could be that I just thought of is a failing switch on you case. It is a real long shot though. One way you could check is by removing the 2 pin connector for the switch from the motherboard header. Then use something to momentarily short the two pins on the motherboard. Now if you're not comfortable doing this, don't, it's just a suggestion. Basically by doing this, you are using the (whatever you are using such as a screw driver) to be the switch. There is no real power here, you are merely connecting the monitoring pin to GND, this signal is passed to the PSU, when the PSU senses that this line (pin 13 (if I remember correctly)) has gone to GND, it turns on. If this doesn't make your system boot, then it isn't the switch.
September 14, 2006 6:51:09 AM

Here’s a Gigabyte fix that worked for someone else.
Clear CMOS (It could boot up after you do).
Go into the BIOS, set memory timings to manual, do not adjust timings, and reboot.

Memtest86 can miss errors that MemtestGold can find, resulting in faulty RAM induced reboots.
Here’s another but I’m not sure if it is 100% accurate either.
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp

When a short is a possible problem it is advisable to re-build the computer outside the case on a piece of cardboard or something non-conductive.

If it boots up,
Go to administrative tools.
Check the event viewer for events that possible caused the reboots.


Run a Virus Checker.
http://www.pandasoftware.com/products/activescan.htm

Make sure you have all the latest Microsoft OS updates like Windows Media Player 10 and security patches.

Use the latest BIOS and Drivers for your system.
September 14, 2006 8:03:51 AM

Thanks for the suggestions techgeek! I'm definitely going to try those before I buy a new PSU. Unfortunately, I'm away at school right now, so I don't have much time/space. (Actually, the problems started right after I moved in, so maybe somthing rattled around). I'm going home this weekend, so Ill let you know what happens after then.

And Scott, as I said in my 1st post, i've already updated to F4. Thanks for the help though.
September 14, 2006 8:08:00 AM

O...techgeek, could a short like you mentioned be reponsible for the reboots also? Or could it be a coincidence that I have 2 problems at once? Its not like the case was moving around while the reboots occured, so I cant see how one second the short is there and the next its gone.
September 14, 2006 11:24:19 PM

Techgeek made another good point you should investigate. A component may be shorted out causing your system not to boot. The best way to test this would be to remove/disconnect all non-critical components like case fans, hard drives, and CD/DVD drives. Reconnect them one at a time to see if any of them could be the problem. Make sure the system is dust free and clear any contaminants that may short components. Finally, ensure your RAM and video is fully seated in their slots because if they aren't it may be causing a short on the motherboard.

ADD: Since you were moving your case around, it is possible that something could be unseated. Before you moved your case did you have these issues and how long were you running this setup before the move?
September 14, 2006 11:53:35 PM

try re seating your memory and your video card....


It would be helpful if you isolate the problem to just media content or general video issues...eg graphics intensive games.


Reinstall OS is another option if its not too inconvenient.

I assume you have antivirus installed
a b V Motherboard
September 17, 2006 4:44:07 PM

A short on a molex connector could be intermittent. The contact could be sitting on a conductive surface (part of the case), vibration or air turbulence would be enough to cause a momentary contact. This is all speculation, you may infact have a failing PSU, these are just some suggestions. Hope all works out for you.
September 18, 2006 3:28:32 PM

Thank you all for your help!

This weekend I went through all of your suggestions. After opening the case and checking all of the connections, making sure there were no obvious shorts, and isolating different components, I was still having the same problems. So...I went ahead and replaced the PSU and everything seems to be working just fine!!!....and this time I got a PSU without modular cables
September 18, 2006 5:13:36 PM

Glad to hear all is working well. Did the PSU fix your video problems too?
September 19, 2006 3:10:23 AM

O god....It seems that my problems are not over yet, even with the new PSU. Now the system seems to boot ok, but it still regularly reboots (maybe a seperate issue, maybe not), about every 10-15 mins. So, I set up the logs in Speedfan and before each reboot, the voltages and temps are all normal...I've also run spyware and virus scans with no results. Also, I've been running Memtest86+ for about 45mins I think, almost 2 passes, with no errors (no reboots either). I'm in desperate need for some suggestions!!! :cry: 
September 19, 2006 2:43:21 PM

The reason I asked is because I have heard some users have had issues with the Easy Tune 5 program that Gigabyte offers. They claim it causes frequent restarts. If your using it you may want to remove it.

ADD: You should try my previous suggestion that I made and get the updated drivers from Intel/Realtek/Marvell. I was having issues with my system rebooting and getting the drivers from the respective sites was one of the things I did to resolve the issue. Also take a look in the event viewer to see if it list any details about the reboot (right click "My Computer" and click "Manage", event viewer will be a option on the left side of the window).
September 20, 2006 3:22:15 AM

Uninstall VLC

Run this free program.
www.ccleaner.com

Under system properties>startup and recovery, enable write system event to log, and send administrative alert.
Uncheck automatically restart. View system event viewer.

Try a Fresh OS install. Not repair install.

Contact Gigabyte technical support.
September 20, 2006 5:13:10 AM

Quote:
The reason I asked is because I have heard some users have had issues with the Easy Tune 5 program that Gigabyte offers. They claim it causes frequent restarts. If your using it you may want to remove it.


I did have it installed, but I'm pretty sure I wasn't using it (unless it running in the bg at startup without me knowing)....I uninstalled it and I-Cool anyway.

Quote:

ADD: You should try my previous suggestion that I made and get the updated drivers from Intel/Realtek/Marvell. I was having issues with my system rebooting and getting the drivers from the respective sites was one of the things I did to resolve the issue.


I installed both the Realtek and Marvel drivers directly from them(not Gigabyte). I also tried to install the chipset drivers from Intel, but I'm not actually sure if they installed :? Is there more to it than running that INF update installer?

Quote:
Also take a look in the event viewer to see if it list any details about the reboot (right click "My Computer" and click "Manage", event viewer will be a option on the left side of the window).


Nothing suspicious there either...*gasp*

...and the reboots continue

Also, I have Spybot S&D installed and I use the registry monitor that comes with it. I don't know why, but I have a crazy reason that there might be a registry problem. An example, after I uninstalled Easy Tune 5, an entry from the registry was deleted (I allowed the spybot resident to allow the change to happen). However, everytime I reboot, it asks again and again if deleting that same registry entry is ok (I've seen other similar occurances recently too)...Maybe the registry isn't saving changes or somthing? Any ideas on this or anything else would be appreciated :) 
September 20, 2006 6:57:10 AM

Just a small idea... Being that stuff is being reinserted into the regristry with every reboot and you are getting reboots every so often, it could be that you are infected with a rootkit trojan. I have seen that kind of unexplainable behavior before and even though I can't really say that it was a rootkit a full reinstall did the trick. Rootkits have the ability to hide themselves; their files, processes, and regristry keys. They can reinsert regristry keys, reinstall software and restart processes when found missing. Being that they hook into the kernel there is no sure fire way to remove them being that there is not really anything that can detect them fully.

I am just suggesting a full reinstall.
September 20, 2006 7:57:37 PM

Quote:
O god....It seems that my problems are not over yet, even with the new PSU. Now the system seems to boot ok, but it still regularly reboots (maybe a seperate issue, maybe not), about every 10-15 mins. So, I set up the logs in Speedfan and before each reboot, the voltages and temps are all normal...I've also run spyware and virus scans with no results. Also, I've been running Memtest86+ for about 45mins I think, almost 2 passes, with no errors (no reboots either). I'm in desperate need for some suggestions!!! :cry: 


Yank one stick of RAM to see if that helps. If the crashes still happen, try the other one.

I would also try reloading Windows, especially if you simply swapped hardware the last time that you upgraded. Your rig is pretty new - did you install Windows from scratch?

Sorry if somebody already suggested this. I skipped reading some of the posts to get to the end. I had to see how your troubleshooting went.
September 21, 2006 3:26:56 AM

Other than inserting one stick of RAM at a time to check for defects, reinstalling windows may be the best option at this point. One way to check your install before a reinstall would be to get an "Live" version of Linux and boot it from the CD. If there are no issues with the live disk then your windows install is messed up.
September 21, 2006 4:36:43 AM

Quote:
Hey guys, I've been having some very weird random(sort of) reboot problems. The reboots only seem to occur when I am playing videos (so far only divx in particular). I've tried with both WMP(whole system just locks up) and VLC(complete reboot). I haven't really tried to see if games cause the reboots too. I've also run prime95, superPI, and a video card stability test for extended periods with no reboots at all.

Also, as for my ram(see below), I've had to manually bump up the timings/voltage to run at the certified settings (which now result in the DDR18V fail). But, the reboots occured with both the new settings and the defaulted settings.

In my attempts to isolate the problem I have:
-installed latest Nvidia drivers
-flashed the latest BIOS
-installed new onboard audio drivers (dxdiag said the old drivers were not signed, new ones are)

On a side note...a few weeks ago the system failed to start up (i believe it was a short)...the problem seemed to fix itself after I played around with some of the power connectors. The only really change was that the fans were wired in a different order, eliminating the use of one molex(could a molex connector cause a short?). After that the system boots fine, so I dont even know if this might affect anything.

System Specs:
Core 2 Extreme X6800
Gigabyte 965P-DQ6 Mobo w/F4 bios (reboots occured with F2 and F3 also)
Zalman CNPS9500 Cooler
2x1GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2 PC2-6400 CAS3 (Had to manually adjust mobo settings to 3-4-3-9 @2.2v)
XFX Geforce 7950 GX2
WD NeoHE 550w PS
150gb Raptor

Temps:
System: around 49-50C
CPU: around 35C idle; max 46C
GPU: idle around 67C

Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks


i was about to blame the psu ..bu i see you have already fixed it......
it`s typical for a defective psu.........
September 21, 2006 5:37:47 AM

I would suggest downloading FC5 and installing it on a spare HDD if you have one.

http://mirrors.kernel.org/fedora/core/5/i386/iso/FC-5-i...

After you install it grab the nVidia drivers and play video under Linux and see if the problem occurs.

Alternatively you can grab a Live CD like Knoppix or Movix and do the same.

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/

If the system locks up under Linux then you have a hardware problem. If it does not it is most likely a software issue.

GL :-D
September 21, 2006 6:31:31 AM

I think I'm gonna try that....is there any software included with Knoppix(or any other live distros) that would do stress tests like Prime95 or SuperPI??? I definitely need a live cd because I don't have any spare HDDs.
September 21, 2006 7:06:42 AM

If you have a great internet connection you might want to try the Knoppix DVD it has like 3000+ packages on the disk :-D

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/knoppix-dvd/KNOP...

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/knoppix-dvd/KNOP...

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/knoppix-dvd/KNOP...

Make sure you check the md5sum before you burn the ISO!

http://www.openoffice.org/dev_docs/using_md5sums.html

PM me if you need anything

GL :-D

PS There are many benchmarks and stress test programs for Linux... too many to list. A good stress test is to continuously compile the Linux kernel for several hours or even days -- a few hours is good enough in most cases.

If your system passed memtest86 / memtest86+ then your RAM is probably good so you should concentrate on other components ( I normally recommend running memtest for 8-12 hours - sometimes if RAM is flaky and not bad outright you may not see any errors until 10 or more passes into the test ).

You might want to download a video and let it run in an infinite loop for several hours under Knoppix or Movix and see what happens while you monitor voltages and temperatures with lm_sensors and by feeling your VGA and CPU HSFs.
September 21, 2006 8:13:34 AM

Quote:
I think I'm gonna try that....is there any software included with Knoppix(or any other live distros) that would do stress tests like Prime95 or SuperPI??? I definitely need a live cd because I don't have any spare HDDs.


the rebooting is likley caused by a BSOD. it just is so fast you dont see the blue screen. right click on my computer then click properties then click on advanced then startup and recovery.
in the system failure box turn off auto reboot and turn on complete memory dump.

then run your system. you should see a BSOD and it should have a stop code and offending driver name



The OP has already done that. Therefore we must conclude it is not a BSOD.
September 21, 2006 8:24:50 AM

Quote:


[Post] (Msg. 4) Posted: Sep Wed 13, 2006 10:18 pm
Post subject: Re: Weird Reboot Problem...Please Help! [in reply to: itneal2277] Reply with quote Reply without quote
itneal2277 wrote:
Do you have any additional PCI or PCI Express cards installed other than the video card? Also are you getting your drivers from Gigabyte or directly from the Intel/Realtek/Marvell/Nvidia website?


Nope, the graphics card is the only card installed. I'm still using the onboard sound, ethernet, so I got those drivers from Gigabyte

Graphics drivers are directly from Nvidia

Quote:


The reason I ask is because I had issues when I had my Audigy 2 ZS and my ATI TV Wonder Elite connected. The sytem would crash when ever I played games. I removed both cards from system but I suspect the Audigy 2 ZS was the issue. Also my system would have reboot problems as well but updating the drivers from their respective sites seemed to fix my issues. Ever since doing this my system has been rock solid with no issues.

Other things you should check is your temps, RAM, and PSU. Run a few games and see if it restarts with them as well. Finally disable automaticly restart in Windows so if it is driver or memory related it may give you some info to hunt down your problem.


I've already disabled automatic restart...the reboots happen without a bluescreen


Quote:


ADD:o OPS! you already answered a few questions while I was responding.


Thanks!





It was hard to see almost missed it myself. :-)
September 21, 2006 8:36:15 AM

rm -f .
September 21, 2006 8:41:29 AM

Quote:
I think I'm gonna try that....is there any software included with Knoppix(or any other live distros) that would do stress tests like Prime95 or SuperPI??? I definitely need a live cd because I don't have any spare HDDs.


the rebooting is likley caused by a BSOD. it just is so fast you dont see the blue screen. right click on my computer then click properties then click on advanced then startup and recovery.
in the system failure box turn off auto reboot and turn on complete memory dump.

then run your system. you should see a BSOD and it should have a stop code and offending driver name



The OP has already done that. Therefore we must conclude it is not a BSOD.


sorry i am tired but i didnt see where this was done and what the results were. can you point me in the right direction?

thanks

edit nevermind i saw where he did this
so its simple now
reboots only happen after BSOD and bad memory/moboard issues. overheating does not reboot and neither does PSU issues. when PSU is bad system doesnt boot or shuts off not reboot


edit again
there is one possiblity aside from PSU and Moboard/ram
if you have a bad hard drive that can trigger a reboot ( i need to write that down) if the drive has power issues it can make the problem look like the psu is bad but really the drive is bad



Good point :-D but since there's major weirdness going on so I look forward to seeing what happens under Linux or any other OS for that matter.

:-D
September 21, 2006 8:51:55 AM

Quote:


ya a repartion and format may help




Well a repartition and format is a good idea ( for windows ) but it can be very painful so a Live CD or DVD may shed some light on the problem before the OP actually spends the time and effort re-installing the whole thing.

:-D
September 21, 2006 1:51:51 PM

Quote:
Other than inserting one stick of RAM at a time to check for defects, reinstalling windows may be the best option at this point. One way to check your install before a reinstall would be to get an "Live" version of Linux and boot it from the CD. If there are no issues with the live disk then your windows install is messed up.


Are there any "Live" CDs that support the Intel ICH8 controller? I didn't have any luck with Knoppix and the ICH7R on my last motherboard so I gave up trying. That was six months ago. My DS3 uses a JMicron 363 RAID controller. I wonder if Knoppix supports it...
September 21, 2006 2:04:28 PM

Any standard controller should work. Some RAID controllers are funky.

IIRC the ICH7 ICH8 and JMicron chipsets are supported but you might have to fiddle with it.
September 28, 2006 11:53:42 PM

Ok, here we go again....

I spent a day trying to get linux to work only to find out my chipset won't be supported until the next kernel release...so I went ahead and reinstalled XP.


...reboots still occur. I did manage to reinstall all of the latest drivers before the first (unintentional) reboot. Is it possible that it could still be one of them causing the problem? If not, whats next? Mobo? Graphics card? Ram? HDD?
September 29, 2006 11:14:54 AM

FC6 should be out in about 1-3 weeks with the new kernel :-)


Good advice from beerandcandy start removing components one at a time until you find the one that is causing the problem.

I suspect it may be your board. Please try an i975X board if you can.

It could also be your VGA although it is probably not defective, it may be drawing too many amps under load. The 73xx / 76xx / 79xx board are very power efficient compared to ATIs offering at this time but yours is a GX2 so it does draw more power than a 7900 would ( about twice as much, I believe ).

Please try any other PCI-E card you may have and see if the problem persists.

If you're the tinkering type you could try using 2 PSUs to power your beast.

This what I've done in the past, I have an Antec SP350 powering my system and then another Antec SP350 powering my VGA card with a PCI-E PWR connector. It is a decent way to spread the load out.

You have to jump pins 13 and 14 or 14 and 15 on the 20pin ATX connector
or pins 16 and 17 on the 24pin ATX connector to turn the 2nd PSU on






You can use a paper clip or a small piece of copper or anything else conductive however be careful mixing certain metals may cause corrosion!!!

GL :-D
September 29, 2006 3:37:52 PM

Ok, I have a question about the gfx card. Would the card be drawing to much power if I haven't been using that pci-e molex connector that is directly on the mobo? (Is it an SLI or isn't it? :wink: ) Note: the most recent reboots (before and after reformat) have been during normal activity, nothing graphics intensive at all. Also, that molex connector was plugged in during most of the reboots/failures to post with the old power supply, I just forgot to plug it in when I installed the new one.
September 29, 2006 3:40:28 PM

Also...if the gfx card or mobo was drawing too much power or shorting, could that be noticed by monitoring the voltages in speed fan?
September 29, 2006 3:51:05 PM

Quote:
Ok, I have a question about the gfx card. Would the card be drawing to much power if I haven't been using that pci-e molex connector that is directly on the mobo? (Is it an SLI or isn't it? :wink: ) Note: the most recent reboots (before and after reformat) have been during normal activity, nothing graphics intensive at all. Also, that molex connector was plugged in during most of the reboots/failures to post with the old power supply, I just forgot to plug it in when I installed the new one.




The 6pin PCI-E molex connector ( pictured in my previous post along with a 24pin ATX connector ) is required for the card to work properly.

It is a miracle it works without it.

I understand the 7950GX2 is actually 2 7900s put together.

You may see strange fluctuations in speedfan if too much power is being used but it's hard to tell.

If you have another PCI-E card or even an ancient PCI card please try it, torture test the machine with Prime95 or SPECViewPerf, etc and report back.

GL :-D
September 29, 2006 6:30:59 PM

Quote:
Ok, I have a question about the gfx card. Would the card be drawing to much power if I haven't been using that pci-e molex connector that is directly on the mobo? (Is it an SLI or isn't it? :wink: ) Note: the most recent reboots (before and after reformat) have been during normal activity, nothing graphics intensive at all. Also, that molex connector was plugged in during most of the reboots/failures to post with the old power supply, I just forgot to plug it in when I installed the new one.




The 6pin PCI-E molex connector ( pictured in my previous post along with a 24pin ATX connector ) is required for the card to work properly.

It is a miracle it works without it.

I understand the 7950GX2 is actually 2 7900s put together.

I wasn't talking about the 6-pin molex connector that is on the gfx card....I meant the 4-pin molex connector for pci-express that is directly on the mobo.

Quote:

You may see strange fluctuations in speedfan if too much power is being used but it's hard to tell.


Ok, because I wasn't seeing any fluctuations during the reboots at all last time...

Quote:

If you have another PCI-E card or even an ancient PCI card please try it, torture test the machine with Prime95 or SPECViewPerf, etc and report back.

GL :-D


I will have to search for one....I'll let you know what happens
September 29, 2006 7:05:15 PM

Oh the 4pin, my bad!

They are all Molex connectors :lol: 
September 30, 2006 7:06:34 PM

Quote:
Oh the 4pin, my bad!

They are all Molex connectors :lol: 


Could that have the same effect on the 7950?
!