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Printer Heads... thermal or piezo

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Anonymous
September 1, 2005 2:47:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Continuing my search for a printer...

Before I go on, this is not a canon v. epson battle - everyone has their
favourites and that's all I want to hear on the subject.

I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ from
piezo print heads?

I have only had Epson printers to-date and looking at a Cannon iP3000 or
iP4000, but the lifespan of a thermal print head is less than a piezo I am
told.

I am now stuck not knowing which print head is better for me in the long
run.

Can anyone give sensible (???) positive discussion on these two types of
print heads please.

Terry
September 1, 2005 5:42:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ from
> piezo print heads?

The word piezo comes from the greek word to squeeze. Certain varities
of crystals expand when charged. That's the piezo-electric effect.
Vibrating crystals peform a piston like action and squeeze ink out the
jets. Key advantage is they are more tolerant to different media from
water to solvents to molten wax. The disadvantage is that continued
operation without headfouling is dependent on having a gasket
protecting the head from air.

Thermals are less tolerant to different media and their operation is
usually dependent on the expantion rate of a fluid going to gas i.e.
water. As with the case of Canon, they have specalized ink ports per
drop size. In the case of the ip4000 for example 2pl and 5pl, in the
case of the ip5000 1pl and 5pl.

Thermals are a disposable technology, though canon heads you can
replace if burnt out, or clean if clogged. This will run you about
$60ish $80ish or so depending on the model which can be 1/2 MSRP or
2/3s street price, and the fact that printers typicaly come with $50ish
in ink makes you question whether to replace the whole dang thing or
buy a new head.

Epson, at least their consumer grade models, are not designed to be
removed. Micropiezo since their operation doesn't depend on generating
heat tend to enjoy a longer operational life... in theory.
September 1, 2005 6:50:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Piezo-electric heads on the other hand have the actual ink 'piston' much
> higher up in the nozzle, and to certain extent just rely on the weight of
> the ink above to move ink into and out of this piston (its mnot quite just a
> valve, but its not far off) - with the result that a clog can stop ink
> flowing completely. That's also the reason Epson printers do more of a clean
> cycle than others - its to try to insure that the ink in the heads isn't
> going to dry out before the printer is next used.

Thanks for the more descriptive explanation... that does make a fair
amount of sense. Though it makes me wonder how the hell my light cyan
in my old r200 exploded.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 11:40:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The IP4000 is a better value and will produce better photo prints when
using OEM Canon ink.

ngreplies wrote:

>Continuing my search for a printer...
>
>Before I go on, this is not a canon v. epson battle - everyone has their
>favourites and that's all I want to hear on the subject.
>
>I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ from
>piezo print heads?
>
>I have only had Epson printers to-date and looking at a Cannon iP3000 or
>iP4000, but the lifespan of a thermal print head is less than a piezo I am
>told.
>
>I am now stuck not knowing which print head is better for me in the long
>run.
>
>Can anyone give sensible (???) positive discussion on these two types of
>print heads please.
>
>Terry
>
>
>
>
September 1, 2005 11:59:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Epson print heads are built in, are reputed to last longer, and tend to clog
more frequently than Canon. Often the clogs can be cleared (using info from
Arthur Entlich's epson head cleaning manual). Canon print heads are
removable and easier to clean. They can be replaced, but the cost is so
high that it is usually more cost effective to buy a new printer. Of
course, a set of OEM ink cartridges costs more than half the cost of a low
end printer, either Canon or Epson!

I've solved the problem by buying a Canon i960, using aftermarket bulk inks
and refilling the cartridges with good (MIS) aftermarket inks. Great photo
prints and no clogs in a year of use. The cost is about $1 per cart or less
as compared to $12 per cart retail. Ive saved enough on the ink costs to
buy more than two new printers when this one fails.

Since the new Canon line that is coming out to follow the current Pixma's
will have a chipped cartridge and newly formulated inks, I would buy one of
the current models and a refill kit from MIS, Formulabs (sold by
Alotofthings) or possibly Hobbicolors (one report on this NG that their inks
are excellent).

Having said all that, I've owned and enjoyed using Epson printers as well.
If I were selling my prints or concerned about the longevity of the prints I
would buy a high end Epson and suffer the possible clogs.

Pay no attention to Measekite, the village troll, who will follow this
message to tell you that aftermarket inks are no good, cause clogs, are sold
by whores, etc. He has no experience with these products or vendors but
always rants about them.

"ngreplies" <ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:D f7kjo$bi1$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Continuing my search for a printer...
>
> Before I go on, this is not a canon v. epson battle - everyone has their
> favourites and that's all I want to hear on the subject.
>
> I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ from
> piezo print heads?
>
> I have only had Epson printers to-date and looking at a Cannon iP3000 or
> iP4000, but the lifespan of a thermal print head is less than a piezo I
> am
> told.
>
> I am now stuck not knowing which print head is better for me in the long
> run.
>
> Can anyone give sensible (???) positive discussion on these two types of
> print heads please.
>
> Terry
>
>
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 1:44:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1125607355.520913.129940@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ
>> from
>> piezo print heads?
>
> The word piezo comes from the greek word to squeeze. Certain varities
> of crystals expand when charged. That's the piezo-electric effect.
> Vibrating crystals peform a piston like action and squeeze ink out the
> jets. Key advantage is they are more tolerant to different media from
> water to solvents to molten wax. The disadvantage is that continued
> operation without headfouling is dependent on having a gasket
> protecting the head from air.
>

*Any* printhead will clog if air gets in and dries the ink. The main
difference is where that happens - in the case of thermal print heads its
very close to the outlet holes - combine that with the fact that thermal
printing literally boils the ink and all that's needed to clear most ink
clogs is a quick cycle to heat the ink behind the clog (pushing the clog
out) and a quick wipe to remove the dried ink.

Piezo-electric heads on the other hand have the actual ink 'piston' much
higher up in the nozzle, and to certain extent just rely on the weight of
the ink above to move ink into and out of this piston (its mnot quite just a
valve, but its not far off) - with the result that a clog can stop ink
flowing completely. That's also the reason Epson printers do more of a clean
cycle than others - its to try to insure that the ink in the heads isn't
going to dry out before the printer is next used.
September 3, 2005 7:05:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Was it refilled? The newer Epson cartridges use a complex set of values
> and airlocks and you can in effect pressurize them if you refill them
> incorrectly.

Acutally nope... it was an OEM light cyan fresh from Office Depot.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 9:52:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Thermal or Piezo: Its All in Your Head

By Art Entlich Copyright 2005

The differences in thermal and piezo printheads is of some importance in
terms of inks that can be used, and other issues, but the type of
printhead does not necessarily preclude that one will always provide a
better quality result when looking at the output.

This was not always the case. One of the reasons the piezo ink head
system caught on (and Epson inkjet printers have always been piezo head
design) is because they were lightyears ahead of thermal printing
designs when they were introduced when it come to output.

Epson, part of the Seiko group, had a fair interest in piezo technology.
Some of you might remember the Seiko Quartz watches with a vibrating
quartz crystal that kept the watch accurate. This was the same
principle that piezo crystals work on. While thermal ink heads use a
resistor that rapidly heads a tiny quantity of ink at the tip of the
outlet forming a vapor bubble or boiled ink and pushing the ink in front
of it forward and out, piezo heads use mechanical force (vibration) to
move the ink.

When thermal ink heads were the only inkjet technology available for
consumers, they were still fairly low resolution, about 150-300 dpi
maximum, and they tended to have a large ink droplet which wasn't very
accurate in size, placement or shape.

When Epson came on the scene with a 720 dpi piezo head (in black only,
just like the thermal companies started with) and smaller and more
accurate dots, the industry competition began "heating up" (excuse the
pun).

It wasn't until Epson came out with the very first Stylus Color printer
at 720 dpi that the industry really took notice. It put all the thermal
printer output to shame.

The reason the piezo technology could do this was because it was using a
much more controllable process to move the ink through the nozzles. The
ink didn't need to be heated, and could use different formulations,
since it didn't have to boil the ink. In fact, as long as the viscosity
was within a reasonable range and had the correct polarity to stick to
or penetrate the paper reasonably well, and was small enough, it could
be put through the heads.

The life span of a piezo head was considerably longer, often by orders
of magnitude, over that of a thermal head. Back then, thermal heads
were integrated into the cartridge and were expected to be replaced with
each ink change.

Fast forward to today. The technologies still basically work the same
way, but both have evolved. I would say thermal has evolved further
relative to its beginning, but it also had further to go. They have made
the heads more resilient, such as the Canon head, which lasts numerous
ink cartridge replacements. The number of jets or nozzles has multiplied
considerably making the printing process much faster. The dots now can
be as small as one picolitre, and are more accurate and uniform in size.
The piezo head has also improved. It can also go down to one picolitre
in size, has been speed up, has more nozzles, but the cost per nozzle
appears to be higher, and so they have not kept up with the speed of
some thermal inkjets. They have, however developed variable dot
technology which allows for different size dots to be produced from the
same nozzle by varying the vibration of the piezo element.

Today differences in output quality can be minimal. The main two areas
tend to be in variations of inks available for piezo heads versus
thermal. Piezo inks come in everything from dye, to pigment to
pigmented to dye sublimation type. Thermal heads have a somewhat harder
time with some of these inks, although some use pigment inks. The head
life is still, in general, longer for piezo heads than for thermal type.

Because the piezo head is mechanical, it doesn't heat the ink or the
head. In spite of what some people have reported, I don't believe they
burn out from lack of ink flow, where thermal head may, and probably
will. With some of the heavier bodied inks, piezo will tend to clog
more, and require a bit more maintenance. Those same inks may not flow
at all with thermal.

However, although the head is significant, you need to consider a lot of
things when deciding on a printer. Cost of the printer itself, life for
the build (head, gearing, paper transport, ink waste inkpads, etc),
warranty, cost of ink, other cost of upkeep (head replacement, etc) ease
of use of software, driver color management accuracy, paper profile
availability, speed, paper types available for the inks that can be
used, ink permanence, CD printing, ability to use bulk inking system,
maximum paper size, how close to the edge it prints, how noisy,
manufacturer's customer service support, cost of servicing, etc. In
other words, you need to look at output and ability to do what you need
it for.

Five years ago, head technology may have been a deciding factor in
selection of an inkjet printer, today it a much more complex puzzle.

Art

ngreplies wrote:

> Continuing my search for a printer...
>
> Before I go on, this is not a canon v. epson battle - everyone has their
> favourites and that's all I want to hear on the subject.
>
> I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ from
> piezo print heads?
>
> I have only had Epson printers to-date and looking at a Cannon iP3000 or
> iP4000, but the lifespan of a thermal print head is less than a piezo I am
> told.
>
> I am now stuck not knowing which print head is better for me in the long
> run.
>
> Can anyone give sensible (???) positive discussion on these two types of
> print heads please.
>
> Terry
>
>
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 10:10:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Was it refilled? The newer Epson cartridges use a complex set of values
and airlocks and you can in effect pressurize them if you refill them
incorrectly.

Art

zakezuke wrote:

>>Piezo-electric heads on the other hand have the actual ink 'piston' much
>>higher up in the nozzle, and to certain extent just rely on the weight of
>>the ink above to move ink into and out of this piston (its mnot quite just a
>>valve, but its not far off) - with the result that a clog can stop ink
>>flowing completely. That's also the reason Epson printers do more of a clean
>>cycle than others - its to try to insure that the ink in the heads isn't
>>going to dry out before the printer is next used.
>
>
> Thanks for the more descriptive explanation... that does make a fair
> amount of sense. Though it makes me wonder how the hell my light cyan
> in my old r200 exploded.
>
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 6:18:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

A friend had an old Canon with 4 cartriges, one large BCI-3e black and 3
BCI-6 CMY. When he first plugged in the cartridges he did not follow the
instruction by pulling the tape at the top to break the wrap as well as
opening up the cartrige vent. He somehow unwraped all of them without
opening up the vent.

The printer printed black and colors briefly and printed well. But then
stops printing CMY colors minutes later. There was no problem with the
black, however. He thought the printer had broken down in printing CMY
colors. At least a year went and he exhausted the BCI-3e Black ink. He
plugged in another one, without opening up the vent either. The printer
went on fine withe the 3 original CMY tanks full of ink but not working.
The 2nd BCI-3e Black ran out of ink again some long time later. The
printer was used as a black text printer only.

When I visited the friend I found his printer with full CMY ink tanks
but not printing CMY colors. I quickly discovered the vent was still
closed so I opened it up one by one. Magically the printer began to
print all colors immediately. Replaced another BCI-3e Black, with vent
opened of course and the printer worked just like new.

So my conclusion is thermal printhead does not burn out due to low or
no ink. It was an old Canon. I don't think a new modern one would be
different.



Arthur Entlich wrote:
> Thermal or Piezo: Its All in Your Head
>
> By Art Entlich Copyright 2005
>
> The differences in thermal and piezo printheads is of some importance in
> terms of inks that can be used, and other issues, but the type of
> printhead does not necessarily preclude that one will always provide a
> better quality result when looking at the output.
>
> This was not always the case. One of the reasons the piezo ink head
> system caught on (and Epson inkjet printers have always been piezo head
> design) is because they were lightyears ahead of thermal printing
> designs when they were introduced when it come to output.
>
> Epson, part of the Seiko group, had a fair interest in piezo technology.
> Some of you might remember the Seiko Quartz watches with a vibrating
> quartz crystal that kept the watch accurate. This was the same
> principle that piezo crystals work on. While thermal ink heads use a
> resistor that rapidly heads a tiny quantity of ink at the tip of the
> outlet forming a vapor bubble or boiled ink and pushing the ink in front
> of it forward and out, piezo heads use mechanical force (vibration) to
> move the ink.
>
> When thermal ink heads were the only inkjet technology available for
> consumers, they were still fairly low resolution, about 150-300 dpi
> maximum, and they tended to have a large ink droplet which wasn't very
> accurate in size, placement or shape.
>
> When Epson came on the scene with a 720 dpi piezo head (in black only,
> just like the thermal companies started with) and smaller and more
> accurate dots, the industry competition began "heating up" (excuse the
> pun).
>
> It wasn't until Epson came out with the very first Stylus Color printer
> at 720 dpi that the industry really took notice. It put all the thermal
> printer output to shame.
>
> The reason the piezo technology could do this was because it was using a
> much more controllable process to move the ink through the nozzles. The
> ink didn't need to be heated, and could use different formulations,
> since it didn't have to boil the ink. In fact, as long as the viscosity
> was within a reasonable range and had the correct polarity to stick to
> or penetrate the paper reasonably well, and was small enough, it could
> be put through the heads.
>
> The life span of a piezo head was considerably longer, often by orders
> of magnitude, over that of a thermal head. Back then, thermal heads
> were integrated into the cartridge and were expected to be replaced with
> each ink change.
>
> Fast forward to today. The technologies still basically work the same
> way, but both have evolved. I would say thermal has evolved further
> relative to its beginning, but it also had further to go. They have made
> the heads more resilient, such as the Canon head, which lasts numerous
> ink cartridge replacements. The number of jets or nozzles has multiplied
> considerably making the printing process much faster. The dots now can
> be as small as one picolitre, and are more accurate and uniform in size.
> The piezo head has also improved. It can also go down to one picolitre
> in size, has been speed up, has more nozzles, but the cost per nozzle
> appears to be higher, and so they have not kept up with the speed of
> some thermal inkjets. They have, however developed variable dot
> technology which allows for different size dots to be produced from the
> same nozzle by varying the vibration of the piezo element.
>
> Today differences in output quality can be minimal. The main two areas
> tend to be in variations of inks available for piezo heads versus
> thermal. Piezo inks come in everything from dye, to pigment to
> pigmented to dye sublimation type. Thermal heads have a somewhat harder
> time with some of these inks, although some use pigment inks. The head
> life is still, in general, longer for piezo heads than for thermal type.
>
> Because the piezo head is mechanical, it doesn't heat the ink or the
> head. In spite of what some people have reported, I don't believe they
> burn out from lack of ink flow, where thermal head may, and probably
> will. With some of the heavier bodied inks, piezo will tend to clog
> more, and require a bit more maintenance. Those same inks may not flow
> at all with thermal.
>
> However, although the head is significant, you need to consider a lot of
> things when deciding on a printer. Cost of the printer itself, life for
> the build (head, gearing, paper transport, ink waste inkpads, etc),
> warranty, cost of ink, other cost of upkeep (head replacement, etc) ease
> of use of software, driver color management accuracy, paper profile
> availability, speed, paper types available for the inks that can be
> used, ink permanence, CD printing, ability to use bulk inking system,
> maximum paper size, how close to the edge it prints, how noisy,
> manufacturer's customer service support, cost of servicing, etc. In
> other words, you need to look at output and ability to do what you need
> it for.
>
> Five years ago, head technology may have been a deciding factor in
> selection of an inkjet printer, today it a much more complex puzzle.
>
> Art
>
> ngreplies wrote:
>
>> Continuing my search for a printer...
>>
>> Before I go on, this is not a canon v. epson battle - everyone has their
>> favourites and that's all I want to hear on the subject.
>>
>> I can understand how thermal print heads work, but how do they differ
>> from
>> piezo print heads?
>>
>> I have only had Epson printers to-date and looking at a Cannon iP3000 or
>> iP4000, but the lifespan of a thermal print head is less than a piezo
>> I am
>> told.
>>
>> I am now stuck not knowing which print head is better for me in the long
>> run.
>>
>> Can anyone give sensible (???) positive discussion on these two types of
>> print heads please.
>>
>> Terry
>>
>>
September 3, 2005 9:55:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

> Epson print heads are built in, are reputed to last longer, and tend to clog
> more frequently than Canon. Often the clogs can be cleared (using info from
> Arthur Entlich's epson head cleaning manual).

Haven't seen Entlich's procedures published on the web. Is it a booklet?
September 3, 2005 10:32:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

It is easily available directly from Arthur. Look for his most recent
posts, email him, and ask him to send you the Epson Head cleaning manual.
He will email it back to you as an attachment. He doesn't charge anything
for it and does this voluntarily as a service to people with Epson head
clogs and other problems. For many very good reasons he prefers to send it
directly.

"Knack" <zymatikNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4319E395.6020706@yahoo.com...
> Burt wrote:
>
>> Epson print heads are built in, are reputed to last longer, and tend to
>> clog more frequently than Canon. Often the clogs can be cleared (using
>> info from Arthur Entlich's epson head cleaning manual).
>
> Haven't seen Entlich's procedures published on the web. Is it a booklet?
Anonymous
September 4, 2005 2:43:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ahhh... this would explain something actually.
I used a recycled cartridge from a supplier I will not name, and for some
reason my Magenta cartridge blew out almost all of it's contents upwards,
downwards and sidewards.
If incorrect refilling causes pressurisation then this could explain the
mess (putting it mildly) caused by the explosion of ink inside the casing...
Good job the lid was down!
I cannot think why Epson have to use such a complicated design for their
cartridges. When I was at University, I was taught the Keep It Simple
System, and in doing so life is made easier.

T

"Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:I7bSe.68646$Hk.95@pd7tw1no...
> Was it refilled? The newer Epson cartridges use a complex set of values
> and airlocks and you can in effect pressurize them if you refill them
> incorrectly.
>
> Art
>
> zakezuke wrote:
>
> >>Piezo-electric heads on the other hand have the actual ink 'piston' much
> >>higher up in the nozzle, and to certain extent just rely on the weight
of
> >>the ink above to move ink into and out of this piston (its mnot quite
just a
> >>valve, but its not far off) - with the result that a clog can stop ink
> >>flowing completely. That's also the reason Epson printers do more of a
clean
> >>cycle than others - its to try to insure that the ink in the heads isn't
> >>going to dry out before the printer is next used.
> >
> >
> > Thanks for the more descriptive explanation... that does make a fair
> > amount of sense. Though it makes me wonder how the hell my light cyan
> > in my old r200 exploded.
> >
Anonymous
September 4, 2005 2:26:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

It's available directly from him (me).

I do not publish to the web.

e-printerhelp(at)mvps(dot)org

(at) = @
(dot) = .

Art

Knack wrote:

> Burt wrote:
>
>> Epson print heads are built in, are reputed to last longer, and tend
>> to clog more frequently than Canon. Often the clogs can be cleared
>> (using info from Arthur Entlich's epson head cleaning manual).
>
>
> Haven't seen Entlich's procedures published on the web. Is it a booklet?
Anonymous
September 4, 2005 2:38:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Not if your purpose in life is to sell ink cartridges and to deter
refilling, it ain;t. ;-)

Epson has some good reasons for their ink cartridge design, such as
preventing oxidation and drying out of inks, making ink flow steady in
high demand situation, etc. But that's only part of the story, as they
say...

Art

ngreplies wrote:

> Ahhh... this would explain something actually.
> I used a recycled cartridge from a supplier I will not name, and for some
> reason my Magenta cartridge blew out almost all of it's contents upwards,
> downwards and sidewards.
> If incorrect refilling causes pressurisation then this could explain the
> mess (putting it mildly) caused by the explosion of ink inside the casing...
> Good job the lid was down!
> I cannot think why Epson have to use such a complicated design for their
> cartridges. When I was at University, I was taught the Keep It Simple
> System, and in doing so life is made easier.
>
> T
>
> "Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:I7bSe.68646$Hk.95@pd7tw1no...
>
>>Was it refilled? The newer Epson cartridges use a complex set of values
>>and airlocks and you can in effect pressurize them if you refill them
>>incorrectly.
>>
>>Art
>>
>>zakezuke wrote:
>>
>>
>>>>Piezo-electric heads on the other hand have the actual ink 'piston' much
>>>>higher up in the nozzle, and to certain extent just rely on the weight
>
> of
>
>>>>the ink above to move ink into and out of this piston (its mnot quite
>
> just a
>
>>>>valve, but its not far off) - with the result that a clog can stop ink
>>>>flowing completely. That's also the reason Epson printers do more of a
>
> clean
>
>>>>cycle than others - its to try to insure that the ink in the heads isn't
>>>>going to dry out before the printer is next used.
>>>
>>>
>>>Thanks for the more descriptive explanation... that does make a fair
>>>amount of sense. Though it makes me wonder how the hell my light cyan
>>>in my old r200 exploded.
>>>
>
>
>
September 4, 2005 9:34:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Day in day out I had problems with Epson's, the first clogged on the
2nd day the replacement clooged on the 4th day - all with Epson
inks.

I went and bought a canon ip5000 the ip4000 is same, it's over 3
months old and still no head cloggs or faulty prints.

With the Epson's I had to check each print whether a text or a photo
with the Canon I dobn't need to as they come out 100% every time.

If this printer went today I would go and buy another, I can't say
that about the Epsons.

People are wanting the best from their printers and yet use any old
ink, I can well understand the reasons because Epson gets you that
way, they guzzle ink at an alarming rate and their inks are far too
expensive, whats so special about them for goodness sake?

If a printer gives reliable results, don't clog and don't guzzle ink
then it deserves the right ink, is there not a difference between
putting diesel or gasolene into a car?

A bit like oil there are different grades and compositions, with a
printer we are talking microns for the print heads and not drain
pipes as nozzles.

Davy
Anonymous
September 4, 2005 11:55:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Davy" <davecoe@blueyonder.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:ZeGSe.68878$Jd.39830@fe11.news.easynews.com...
> Day in day out I had problems with Epson's, the first clogged on the
> 2nd day the replacement clooged on the 4th day - all with Epson
> inks.
>
> I went and bought a canon ip5000 the ip4000 is same, it's over 3
> months old and still no head cloggs or faulty prints.
>
> With the Epson's I had to check each print whether a text or a photo
> with the Canon I dobn't need to as they come out 100% every time.
>
> If this printer went today I would go and buy another, I can't say
> that about the Epsons.
>
> People are wanting the best from their printers and yet use any old
> ink, I can well understand the reasons because Epson gets you that
> way, they guzzle ink at an alarming rate and their inks are far too
> expensive, whats so special about them for goodness sake?
>
> If a printer gives reliable results, don't clog and don't guzzle ink
> then it deserves the right ink, is there not a difference between
> putting diesel or gasolene into a car?
>
> A bit like oil there are different grades and compositions, with a
> printer we are talking microns for the print heads and not drain
> pipes as nozzles.

Looking at the relative price of epson and canon a3+ printers it seems the
very top end canon is cheaper than the epsons. The other epsons are
cheaper. The r1800 looks almost same spec as 2100. Mind you the epson inks
are 11.99 each. The gloss that covers the whole page may be 6.99 but as it
covers the entire page on its own must run out alarmingly quickly. The
genuine canon carts are 7.99 each from same suppliers. Of more interest to
me is that amateur users get great results out of the box. I am still
trying to tweak my epson ones with compatible ink. Not a problem with
canon. Canon have worked great with most inks and paper combinations.
Epson seem alot more fussy. I think i will keep my canon for day to day
stuff and use the epson for critical work and where longevity is an issue.
With the reduced work load the ink usage may actually increase due to more
cleaning cycles. I have got through a hell of a lot of paper in my
experiments but i have hardly turned the printer off. Leaving it on full
time has meant that only one cleaning cycle has so far occured.
September 5, 2005 1:34:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Ian
I am more into graphics and documents than photos, I do print photos
on a regular basis just to keep the 'ink flow' so to speak, I even
did this on the Epson and they still clogged.

Don't get me wrong when the Epson printer decided to print it did a
good job but the clogging issue and having to keep doing a nozzle
clean was way too bad.

I could have understood the problem if the printer was near a heater,
radiator or under a window in direct sunlight or anywhere that might
have affected it.

Quite happy with the ip5000, mind you I was dubious about getting it,
all I known was clogs and thought the finer nozzles would be more
problematic - how wrong I was. If this printer packed in I would go
out and buy another without any hesitation.

After being Epsonmatised I've now been Canonised

Davy
!