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Ram For After Effects - Stable & Fast

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  • Memory
  • Rendering
  • RAM
  • Product
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September 15, 2006 11:16:16 PM

Hey Everybody,
I'm looking to upgrade to Conroe in the next couple of weeks, and I'm going to need to upgrade my RAM as well. I'm going to go with the E6600 I believe. So I'm looking at Ram, and I'm wondering what the differences are between these two sets:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?ATT=20145015&...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?ATT=20145590&...

The obvious thing is the timings. The first is 4-4-4-12 and the other is 5-5-5-12

The voltages are the same....1.9 - As far as I can tell, the only other difference is the price. So I'm kinda wondering why the one is more expensive.

I'm going to be doing HEAVY Adobe After Effects Rendering which basically eats RAM for dinner, so I'm looking to get the fastest and most stable Ram possible. I looked at the OCZ ram, but found that a lot of people had problems with the voltage settings on MBs. I'd rather just avoid that stuff, even though its cheaper.

So what do you think I need? I'm looking for good Ram to render in After Effects. I currently have 2gigs of DDR pC3200 RAM and the render times are killing me!! :( 

So what do you people think? Help would be really appreciated!! :) 

More about : ram effects stable fast

September 16, 2006 12:43:23 AM

It depends on what your motherboard will allow.Check the specs.The difference between the two are 800mhz and 667mhz.If you are rendering you probably want the fastest supported by the board.Hope this helps.
September 16, 2006 4:10:32 AM

strong is right. I wouldn't expect big overall performance differences from running RAM at DDR2-800 vs. DDR2-667. I'd go with the DDR2-800 and O/C the CPU for a bigger performance difference (perhaps dropping down one model in CPU for money savings).
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September 16, 2006 2:04:12 PM

I see what you guys are saying. So do you think it would be better for me to drop from the E6600 to the E6400 and then spend more money on memory?
September 16, 2006 3:12:47 PM

Quote:
Hey Everybody,
I'm looking to upgrade to Conroe in the next couple of weeks, and I'm going to need to upgrade my RAM as well. I'm going to go with the E6600 I believe. So I'm looking at Ram, and I'm wondering what the differences are between these two sets:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?ATT=20145015&...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?ATT=20145590&...

The obvious thing is the timings. The first is 4-4-4-12 and the other is 5-5-5-12

The voltages are the same....1.9 - As far as I can tell, the only other difference is the price. So I'm kinda wondering why the one is more expensive.

I'm going to be doing HEAVY Adobe After Effects Rendering which basically eats RAM for dinner, so I'm looking to get the fastest and most stable Ram possible. I looked at the OCZ ram, but found that a lot of people had problems with the voltage settings on MBs. I'd rather just avoid that stuff, even though its cheaper.

So what do you think I need? I'm looking for good Ram to render in After Effects. I currently have 2gigs of DDR pC3200 RAM and the render times are killing me!! :( 

So what do you people think? Help would be really appreciated!! :) 


the two sets of ram you picked are very similiar, in that if you get the ddr2-800 with 5-5-5-12 timings you could easily back it down to ddr2-667 with 4-4-4-12 timings, now if you ge the ddr2-667 with 4-4-4-12 timings you could as well overclock it easily to ddr2-800 5-5-5-12, essentially if you do not plan on overclocking then getting setting your ram at ddr2-533 with the lowest timings would be best with a 1:1 ratio with the cpu, if you plan on overclocking then getting ddr2-800 and running the cpu and ram with a 1:1 ratio would give you the best performance
September 16, 2006 9:06:32 PM

Quote:
I see what you guys are saying. So do you think it would be better for me to drop from the E6600 to the E6400 and then spend more money on memory?

You are probably best off by switching to 64-bit Windows, getting 64-bit versions of your Adobe software, and getting a MB that will handle 8GB or more of RAM, but start by installing 4GB. In general, you will get a bigger performance boost by doubling the amount of RAM from 2GB to 4GB than by going from and E6600 to E6700. Of course, you need a 64-bit OS and 64-bit software to take advantage of more than 2GB of RAM. So you see, there are many variables, including cost, and you've only told us a very little about what your needs and constraints are.
September 17, 2006 1:52:12 AM

Ok, thanks everybody for the advice. I'm not sure if Adobe has even released a 64bit version of its software yet, so I guess I'll have to wait on that. I'll give a little bit more info so maybe you guys can help me better.

Currently, I'm running an AMD 64 3700 with 2gigs of PC-3200 RAM. I'm not currently overclocking anything. I'm looking to purchase a new system to help with render times for Adobe After Effects which is a pretty RAM intensive program. I'm looking to go with Conroe, because I would later like to upgrade to quad-core and it seems to be the fastest thing on the market right now. The most important thing for me is cutting render times in Adobe After Effects. I'm looking to get 2 gigs of ram, and will later upgrade to more. Here is the current set I'm looking at along with the others in the original post:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1682...

Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated!! :) 
September 17, 2006 2:16:56 AM

Quote:
Ok, thanks everybody for the advice. I'm not sure if Adobe has even released a 64bit version of its software yet, ...
I'm looking to get 2 gigs of ram, and will later upgrade to more.
More RAM won't help until they do, because of 32-bit addressing limitations. Max for one app is 2GB under normal Win XP, with 3GB for whole system. If software is recompiled, it can access max 3GB if a WinXP startup flag is set.

Quote:
...The most important thing for me is cutting render times in Adobe After Effects..

You should find out whether the render times in your current system are CPU-lmited or RAM-limited (I don't know). If CPU-limited, you should considering getting an overclocked C2D system.
September 17, 2006 6:03:44 PM

Hey, thanks for replying! How would i go about checking if it is a cpu problem or a ram problem? Is there a program that can test this? Thanks for your help!!
September 17, 2006 6:34:55 PM

I don't know much about Adobe; one easy test to do is to bring up the Windows Task Manager (one way is to press CtrlAltDel at the same time), click on the "Performance" tab and monitor the "CPU Usage" while you are doing rendering. That will at least tell you if your CPU(s) is/are being maxed out.
September 18, 2006 1:10:19 AM

Regarding After Effects support for windows 64 bit, I spoke with an Adobe representative and also looked up a bit of info in forums and the support and stability just arent there yet. I plan on installing a dual boot anyway so I can test out all of the apps I plan on using. Apparently, most of the issues arise from the key activations, not the actual product itself. You will see a boost in performance but no Adobe product is currently available in native 64 bit. I would need to get a patch, not sure from where yet, but I understand that you need a patch. They plan on having the apps available in 64 bit around christmas time, or so they say
September 18, 2006 1:44:06 AM

Yeah, I'm wondering how much they're gonna charge for the 64 bit upgrade.....probably going to have sell my left kidney.
!