Pigment inks and dye inks...

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.

Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
up quicker than dye based inks.

I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.

Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.

So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
18 answers Last reply
More about pigment inks inks
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <dfd927$1sr$3@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>,
    ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk says...
    > My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    > if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    > even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >
    > Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
    > up quicker than dye based inks.
    >
    > I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    > argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
    > of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >
    > Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
    > refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >
    > So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
    >
    It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    just pay the piper.
    I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.

    --
    Robert D Feinman
    Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    http://robertdfeinman.com
    mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Your assesment is true with most pigmented ink printers, however, much
    more prevalent with piezo heads. It is not uncommon with the Epson
    desktops that if not used for a short time, your heads become
    unrepairable, and your printer worthless. The ip4000 is an outstanding
    printer and Canon builds upon their bubblejet expertise with your
    large-format W6400. The printer is fantastic. my recommendation would
    be to stick with thermal head technology for your pigmented ink
    requirements.
    ngreplies wrote:
    > My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    > if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    > even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >
    > Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
    > up quicker than dye based inks.
    >
    > I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    > argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
    > of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >
    > Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
    > refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >
    > So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Agreed, you must use your pigment ink type printers.

    I've had an Epson 2200 for a couple of years and have not had an issue
    with it (thank God, to much $). I do print at least one 8x11 every
    month and that seems to have done the trick

    G


    On 4 Sep 2005 09:58:42 -0700, mike@plottersupplies.com wrote:

    >Your assesment is true with most pigmented ink printers, however, much
    >more prevalent with piezo heads. It is not uncommon with the Epson
    >desktops that if not used for a short time, your heads become
    >unrepairable, and your printer worthless. The ip4000 is an outstanding
    >printer and Canon builds upon their bubblejet expertise with your
    >large-format W6400. The printer is fantastic. my recommendation would
    >be to stick with thermal head technology for your pigmented ink
    >requirements.
    >ngreplies wrote:
    >> My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    >> if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    >> even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >>
    >> Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
    >> up quicker than dye based inks.
    >>
    >> I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    >> argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
    >> of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >>
    >> Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
    >> refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >>
    >> So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I had two Epsons, the first clogged on the 2nd day, the replacement
    clogged on the 4th day and that was with Epson inks.

    I now have a Canon ip5000 (ip4000 is the same), over 3 months old and
    not one single head clog or nozzle print test to date.

    I found with the Epson I had to check each print whether text or
    photo, with the Canon I don't need to.

    I do feel the reason people uses 3rd party inks is because the
    printers like the Epsons I had not only guzzled them they wastedr a
    fair amount which leaves people no option but refilling or buying
    cheap inks.

    A good reliable printer, which does'nt waste ink and economical to use
    is worthy of having the right ink.

    With a print head we are talking microns and not drain pipes as
    nozzles, ink I feel is a bit like different grades of oil, after all
    you would'nt put gasoline or petrol and a deisel driven engine.

    Davy
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...

    <snipped>

    > It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    > also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    > just pay the piper.
    > I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    > ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >
    > --
    > Robert D Feinman
    > Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    > http://robertdfeinman.com
    > mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com


    That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye based
    Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers there is
    absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non OEM inks cause
    more clogging. What you might be seeing is that OEM ink is so expensive it
    results in printer usage being less due to the excessive costs involved.
    With refill inks the costs are so much lower that the printers are using
    much more ink because of a heavier print demand. As regards Epson printers
    using pigmented inks, the reports on this newsgroup suggest that clogging
    happens with any ink - OEM or third party.
    --
    Ron
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    drc023 wrote:
    > "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...
    >
    > <snipped>
    >
    >>It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >>also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    >>just pay the piper.
    >>I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    >>ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Robert D Feinman
    >>Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    >>http://robertdfeinman.com
    >>mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
    >
    >
    >
    > That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye based
    > Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers there is
    > absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non OEM inks cause
    > more clogging.

    I agree, without any exaggeration. I've been following this newsgroup
    for the past year and there is no noticeable difference in clogging
    between Canon OEM and non-OEM inks. The biggest cause of clogging is
    under use. I've heard it so often here ("I don't print that often",
    etc). People fail to understand that inks are quick drying - they must
    be! - and will eventually harden in the nozzles if they don't use their
    printers once in a while. I can't tell anyone exactly how often a
    printer should be used. But once or twice a week would probably be
    sufficient to clear the nozzles of "old ink" and keep things perfectly
    fluid.

    -Taliesyn
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Robert Feinman wrote:

    >In article <dfd927$1sr$3@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>,
    >ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk says...
    >
    >
    >>My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    >>if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    >>even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >>
    >>Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
    >>up quicker than dye based inks.
    >>
    >>I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    >>argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
    >>of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >>
    >>Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
    >>refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >>
    >>So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    >just pay the piper.
    >
    >

    THIS IS THE TRUTH

    >I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    >ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Taliesyn wrote:

    > drc023 wrote:
    >
    >> "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...
    >>
    >> <snipped>
    >>
    >>> It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >>> also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    >>> just pay the piper.
    >>> I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    >>> ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Robert D Feinman
    >>> Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    >>> http://robertdfeinman.com
    >>> mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye
    >> based Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers there
    >> is absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non OEM
    >> inks cause more clogging.
    >
    >
    > I agree, without any exaggeration. I've been following this newsgroup
    > for the past year and there is no noticeable difference in clogging
    > between Canon OEM and non-OEM inks. The biggest cause of clogging is
    > under use. I've heard it so often here ("I don't print that often",
    > etc). People fail to understand that inks are quick drying - they must
    > be! - and will eventually harden in the nozzles if they don't use their
    > printers once in a while. I can't tell anyone exactly how often a
    > printer should be used. But once or twice a week would probably be
    > sufficient to clear the nozzles of "old ink" and keep things perfectly
    > fluid.
    >
    > -Taliesyn
    Our local moron troll has yet to figure that one out!
    What an complete idiot.
    Frank
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Robert Feinman wrote:

    > In article <dfd927$1sr$3@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>,
    > ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk says...
    >
    >>My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    >>if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    >>even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >>
    >>Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to gunge
    >>up quicker than dye based inks.
    >>
    >>I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    >>argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the simplicity
    >>of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >>
    >>Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption to
    >>refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >>
    >>So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
    >>
    >
    > It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    > also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    > just pay the piper.
    > I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    > ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >
    Total bullshit!
    Frank
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Taliesyn wrote:

    > drc023 wrote:
    >
    >> "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...
    >>
    >> <snipped>
    >>
    >>> It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >>> also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink
    >>> and
    >>> just pay the piper.
    >>> I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    >>> ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Robert D Feinman
    >>> Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    >>> http://robertdfeinman.com
    >>> mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye
    >> based Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers
    >> there is absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non
    >> OEM inks cause more clogging.
    >
    >
    > I agree, without any exaggeration. I've been following this newsgroup
    > for the past year and there is no noticeable difference in clogging
    > between Canon OEM and non-OEM inks.

    TOTAL EITHER BULLSHIT OR HORSESHIT

    > The biggest cause of clogging is
    > under use.

    MORE SO WITH AFTERMARKET OFF BRAND INKS

    > I've heard it so often here ("I don't print that often",
    > etc). People fail to understand that inks are quick drying - they must
    > be! - and will eventually harden in the nozzles if they don't use their
    > printers once in a while. I can't tell anyone exactly how often a
    > printer should be used. But once or twice a week would probably be
    > sufficient to clear the nozzles of "old ink" and keep things perfectly
    > fluid.
    >
    > -Taliesyn


    AND THAT MEANS YOU CAN NEVER GO ON A VACATION UNLESS YOU TAKE YOUR
    PRINTER WITH YOU.
    HA HA HA HA HA
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:
    >
    >
    > Taliesyn wrote:
    >
    >> drc023 wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...
    >>>
    >>> <snipped>
    >>>
    >>>> It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >>>> also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink
    >>>> and
    >>>> just pay the piper.
    >>>> I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that the
    >>>> ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Robert D Feinman
    >>>> Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    >>>> http://robertdfeinman.com
    >>>> mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye
    >>> based Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers
    >>> there is absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non
    >>> OEM inks cause more clogging.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I agree, without any exaggeration. I've been following this newsgroup
    >> for the past year and there is no noticeable difference in clogging
    >> between Canon OEM and non-OEM inks.
    >
    >
    > TOTAL EITHER BULLSHIT OR HORSESHIT

    So, you're not sure . . .

    But I am sure.

    >> The biggest cause of clogging is
    >> under use.
    >
    >
    > MORE SO WITH AFTERMARKET OFF BRAND INKS

    You DO NOT HAVE the figures. And don't lie. Last time you invented 8
    reports of clogging with non-oem inks PER DAY. Very amusing. But most
    anyone who follows this newsgroup instantly tosses you and your
    credibility in the kill file.

    >
    >> I've heard it so often here ("I don't print that often",
    >> etc). People fail to understand that inks are quick drying - they must
    >> be! - and will eventually harden in the nozzles if they don't use their
    >> printers once in a while. I can't tell anyone exactly how often a
    >> printer should be used. But once or twice a week would probably be
    >> sufficient to clear the nozzles of "old ink" and keep things perfectly
    >> fluid.
    >>
    >> -Taliesyn
    >
    >
    >
    > AND THAT MEANS YOU CAN NEVER GO ON A VACATION UNLESS YOU TAKE YOUR
    > PRINTER WITH YOU.
    > HA HA HA HA HA

    It's not funny.

    Sadly, this is what happens sometimes when people go on extended
    vacations, or just don't use their printers in a while. They come home
    and find their printheads had committed suicide from non-use.

    Myself, I don't vacation. But if I did go, I'd remove the cartridges,
    seal them tightly, and put them away in a cool place. But first I'd take
    out the printhead and wash out all of the ink. And I mean, all the ink,
    until it ran perfectly clean from the nozzles. Then I'd feed through
    some cleaning solution in the intake tubes and put it away in a baggy
    until I returned from Tahiti (wishful thinking). Reinstalled, it'd be
    like a new printer instead of a nasty surprise.

    -Taliesyn
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "ngreplies" <ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dfd927$1sr$3@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer will clog
    > if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found that
    > even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >
    > Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend to
    > gunge
    > up quicker than dye based inks.
    >
    > I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    > argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the
    > simplicity
    > of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >
    > Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable assumption
    > to
    > refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be minimised.
    >
    > So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?

    Buy quality third party refills such as jet tec. They are usually licenced.
    Don't bother refilling yourself. Seeing as you are a minimum user i would
    go with canon.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > > > They are usually licenced.
    > >Licensed by whom?
    > epson

    I have never heard of such a thing. I've heard of the brand JetTec
    "Live it Print it" but never have I heard that they are licensed by
    Epson. I have NEVER heard of Epson doing anything similar, in fact I
    have heard Epson kicking and screaming about their mission to squash
    aftermarket ink producers. Ink is such a cash cow for any printer
    manufacturer. I imagine it may be possible to get a license to produce
    their ink, or make a deal to offer their ink under a different label
    but I have never heard of this ever happening.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Licensed by whom?

    ian lincoln wrote:

    > Buy quality third party refills such as jet tec. They are usually licenced.
    > Don't bother refilling yourself. Seeing as you are a minimum user i would
    > go with canon.
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    epson

    "Mike Berger" <berger@shout.net> wrote in message
    news:dfl3l4$tru$1@roundup.shout.net...
    > Licensed by whom?
    >
    > ian lincoln wrote:
    >
    >> Buy quality third party refills such as jet tec. They are usually
    >> licenced. Don't bother refilling yourself. Seeing as you are a minimum
    >> user i would go with canon.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > <snipped>
    >What you might be seeing is that OEM ink is so expensive it
    > results in printer usage being less due to the excessive costs involved.
    > With refill inks the costs are so much lower that the printers are using
    > much more ink because of a heavier print demand. As regards Epson printers
    > using pigmented inks, the reports on this newsgroup suggest that clogging
    > happens with any ink - OEM or third party.
    > --
    > Ron
    There is a lot of truth in what you say about the expense of printing
    reducing the amount actually printed. I would often print out my favourite
    holiday pictures but for the fact it costs as much if not more than if I
    took my old 35mm film camera instead of the digital one and paid to have the
    film processed.
    T
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Frank wrote:

    > Taliesyn wrote:
    >
    >> drc023 wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Robert Feinman" <robert.feinman@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:MPG.1d84c1164bc2e37198995c@news.acedsl.com...
    >>>
    >>> <snipped>
    >>>
    >>>> It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging
    >>>> are
    >>>> also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended
    >>>> ink and
    >>>> just pay the piper.
    >>>> I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that
    >>>> the
    >>>> ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Robert D Feinman
    >>>> Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    >>>> http://robertdfeinman.com
    >>>> mail: robert.feinman@gmail.com
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> That seems to be a very global statement. Are you referring to dye
    >>> based Canon or pigment based Epson printers? With Canon printers
    >>> there is absolutely no evidence at all to show that good quality non
    >>> OEM inks cause more clogging.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I agree, without any exaggeration. I've been following this newsgroup
    >> for the past year and there is no noticeable difference in clogging
    >> between Canon OEM and non-OEM inks. The biggest cause of clogging is
    >> under use. I've heard it so often here ("I don't print that often",
    >> etc). People fail to understand that inks are quick drying - they must
    >> be! - and will eventually harden in the nozzles if they don't use their
    >> printers once in a while. I can't tell anyone exactly how often a
    >> printer should be used. But once or twice a week would probably be
    >> sufficient to clear the nozzles of "old ink" and keep things perfectly
    >> fluid.
    >>
    >> -Taliesyn
    >
    > Our local moron troll has yet to figure that one out!
    > What an complete idiot. Frank da troll
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Frank wrote:

    > Robert Feinman wrote:
    >
    >> In article <dfd927$1sr$3@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>,
    >> ngreplies@tdrd.freeserve.co.uk says...
    >>
    >>> My experience with printers leads me to believe that any printer
    >>> will clog
    >>> if not used very often. At one time I stuck with OEM inks and found
    >>> that
    >>> even they suffered airlocks and gungeing up.
    >>>
    >>> Pigment based inks are used widely, but in my experience they tend
    >>> to gunge
    >>> up quicker than dye based inks.
    >>>
    >>> I have stuck with Epson, but am now torn between Epson and Canon, the
    >>> argument being between the reliability of piezo heads against the
    >>> simplicity
    >>> of the ink supply system of the Canon iP4000.
    >>>
    >>> Since I do not use my printer often, would it be a reasonable
    >>> assumption to
    >>> refill with dye based inks so that the chance of drying out be
    >>> minimised.
    >>>
    >>> So, sensible to refill with dye instead of pigment?
    >>>
    >>
    >> It seems that those who have the most trouble with printer clogging are
    >> also those who use off brand refills. Stick with the recommended ink and
    >> just pay the piper.
    >> I find that Epson is pretty good at capping the print heads so that
    >> the ink drying is not an issue. I'm using one of the pigmented models.
    >>
    > Total bullshit!
    > Frank

    More FrankShit
Ask a new question

Read More

Printers Epson Canon Peripherals