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Video Card for widescreen resolutions?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 17, 2006 5:00:19 PM

My onboard i810 video doesn't seem to support my widescreen LCD TV's 1366x768 native resolution in Linux so I guess I need a new one. Can anyone recommend an inexpensive video card for general stuff like DVD and video playback, no gaming for me? It should have a DVI output, or do video cards ever have an HDMI output? OpenGL support might come in handy, although I'm not sure how I'd use it. It definitely needs to be able to output at resolutions like 1366x768 and it should work well in Linux. Can anyone recommend such a card?

edit: One other requirement that I bet limits my options a lot is it needs to be PCI.
September 17, 2006 6:21:53 PM

Looks good to me. Will a PCI Express card work in a rather old motherboard's PCI slot?

Are you sure that card will display widescreen resolutions?

Have you heard anything about the Linux support by any chance?
Related resources
September 17, 2006 6:36:49 PM

Quote:
Looks good to me. Will a PCI Express card work in a rather old motherboard's PCI slot?

Are you sure that card will display widescreen resolutions?

Have you heard anything about the Linux support by any chance?


No it wont.
September 17, 2006 6:38:26 PM

1) PCI and PCIe are not compatible.
2) That card can display widescreen resolutions fine.
3) It's an Nvidia card so Linux support is generally very good.
September 17, 2006 6:57:09 PM

I think the first choice is a simple one.. You really want an NVIDA card. ATI support in Linux is nowhere near as good. For the sort of tasks you are talking of you dont really nead that much power although that is quite a high screen res.

I guess you are on some integrated small form factor system hence the need for PCI and not AGP. From my quick look I think you are looking for something liks

FX5200 (PCI)

As for the OpenGL support that will come when you install the Nvidia Drivers and your applications will just use it. You will see a difference in Tux Racer :D 

Hope it helps.. Glad to see a fellow linux head round here :D 

PS.. First post!
September 17, 2006 7:18:20 PM

Quote:
Can you guys recommend a PCI Nvidia card that will do widescreen resolutions and DVI out? Also, no fan please.

I did find this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
The Geforce 6200 is a better card than the FX5200 by miles.
Seriously, you're asking for too much in a PCI card.
September 17, 2006 7:20:57 PM

Hey AudioVoodoo,

Thanks, I think you're exactly right. An fanless PCI FX5200 is the way to go. Maybe I can find a cheap one on eBay.
September 17, 2006 7:47:16 PM

What is the functional difference between the 6200 and FX5200? This is not for any type of gaming.
September 17, 2006 9:03:12 PM

the 6200 is one generation ahead of the fx5200 in terms of its gpu, and i can barely support decoding hd video with my 6800xt agp so dont think of working anymiracles with any of those cards on pci
September 17, 2006 9:05:30 PM

I'd take note of some of the other comments that people are making.. PCI is a dead end for graphics. I'm fairly sure it would do for the tasks you describe but keep in mind I've never played with one myself... :!:

Just to keep the ideas flowing... have you thought about a new motherboard? It might actually work out cheaper to buy a new board and a chepo AGP card.. that would kind of depend on your other hardware though.

If you can get something for beer money then its worth a shot..
September 17, 2006 9:06:46 PM

those cards can run vids in really crappy resolutions fine nothing over 640x480, dont expect any hd res video to match ur tv resolution, for crying out loud buy a new system, if ur want hd video, u need a current gen card at least

the best solution is to wait for dx 10, get a mid range card and a cheap dual core comp, ull be set
September 17, 2006 9:13:32 PM

Quote:
the 6200 is one generation ahead of the fx5200 in terms of its gpu, and i can barely support decoding hd video with my 6800xt agp so dont think of working anymiracles with any of those cards on pci


I'm looking at your comment and I see what you mean.. at that resolution it really might be asking to much even on DVD playback. I get away (just) with a crapy old Radeon9200 (with a whole 64Mb!! Woot!!) but then I'm AGP and only running 1280x1024.

Anybody actually done it and can tell us how they got on?
September 17, 2006 9:40:26 PM

i seriuosly doubt u hav a gd enough cpu and ram to keep up anyways

ud be better off if a hardware vendor came over and pissed in ur comp, then u upgrading
September 17, 2006 9:48:55 PM

Quote:
Just to keep the ideas flowing... have you thought about a new motherboard? It might actually work out cheaper to buy a new board and a chepo AGP card.. that would kind of depend on your other hardware though.


I agree on that, it is better in the long run too. Best would be to buy a cheap PCI-e board.
September 17, 2006 10:00:36 PM

Quote:
Just to keep the ideas flowing... have you thought about a new motherboard? It might actually work out cheaper to buy a new board and a chepo AGP card.. that would kind of depend on your other hardware though.


I agree on that, it is better in the long run too. Best would be to buy a cheap PCI-e board.

You are right but if there is no AGP slots its likely to be older hardware.. Second hand boards should be easier to find with AGP and the gamers are selling the AGP graphics as they continue the never ending upgrades...

Should be some solutions out there..
September 17, 2006 10:04:25 PM

there are way too many cheap pcie solutions ever since it became standard to buy agp as a new setup
September 17, 2006 10:23:51 PM

Quote:
there are way too many cheap pcie solutions ever since it became standard to buy agp as a new setup


I did say second hand.. But yeah for a new build you are totally right. One of the reasons I put up with a crap card. For my situation I'm better holding out untill I'm forced to a near total rebuild. I tend to work my computing on the cheap. Running Linux and older hardware I get better drivers and a low TCO.

To the OP: Could you say just what you are running and just what your budget is? I'd be intreagued to see how the options would stack up. I really can see arguments in both directions.
September 17, 2006 10:27:45 PM

yesyes, budget flexibililty is needed, imo, nvr get something great while lax on something else, is ur case ur display is nice, but ur hardware is on the downside
September 17, 2006 11:10:08 PM

After doing some research and making some calculations, I think I'll buy:

case and power supply: $30
socket 370 motherboard: $30
512MB PC100 memory: $30
big hard drive: $100

The thing is, I would need to upgrade my current system with the memory and hard drive anyway, so it makes sense to buy a new case and motherboard and get an AGP card instead of PCI. It looks like an AGP card is half the price of PCI anyway.

I already have a Tualatin Celeron 1.2Ghz CPU, Lite-On DVD burner, SB Live card, and NIC.

Which Nvidia card would you suggest for this system? Please keep in mind it's only for DVD, video, and music playback, and web browsing.
September 17, 2006 11:14:29 PM

The 6200 PCI I linked would have been fine for all of those tasks, but you had to have a fanless videocard. :roll:
September 17, 2006 11:28:25 PM

I'm inclined to go with the pervious poster and just recommend a new rig. At that sort of level you are sinking dead money. A $30 case and PSU is unlikely to be of any sort of quality and I'm not even sure if the socket 370 board is going to support a really large drive. That memory is slow and all in all you are not in for the best of experiences. :( 

Sorry to say it but I think your going to be looking at a new rig to get any sort of sensible solution. You certainly dont need some fire breathing monster with all the bells but you are going to need more than I think your rig has to offer.

You have $190 towards a new build. Bite the bullet and make a major leap forwards and you will find it the smarter long term investment.
September 17, 2006 11:36:44 PM

WHOOA THERE BIG FELLA!

You don't need a new video card. Built in video can handle custom resolutions just fine. What you need is "PowerStrip" by Entech of Taiwan. PowerStrip allows you to create any custom resolution you like, provided your graphics chipset is supported - which it most certainly is.

PowerStrip has about 88 Quintillion other really great features too: like GPU core and memory overclocking, icon control, screen geometry tweaking, fine granularity control over the advanced timing features of CRTs (and LCDs too) and absolute contrtol over refresh rates.
September 17, 2006 11:48:06 PM

Come on now. A P3-1.2Ghz with 512MB RAM and a 64MB video card won't be able to satisfactorily play back DVDs in Linux?
September 18, 2006 12:17:31 AM

why do u continually try to cheap out on this stuf, first of all, dont u want to play high def vids in the future? obviously u hav the display for it, sceond if ur jus doin that stuf, internet, vids, etc. i wouldnt touch linux
September 18, 2006 12:29:37 AM

What kind of hardware would I need to play back an HD video?

edit: Is anyone even talking about HD-DVD or Blu-Ray computer drives yet?
September 18, 2006 12:41:11 AM

u dont need that u can dl hd video, and i said my comp barely runs vid on 720p, and ur tv can probably do 1080i

u would need a set up better then mine, im talking dual core procs and current gen vid card

blu ray and hd dvds is jus taking hd vid and sticking it on a disk
September 18, 2006 1:17:07 AM

I definitely can't afford to buy a state-of-the-art dual-core system so I may as well get something good enough for DVDs for now, until I can reliably get HD video on my computer.

How can people copy HD movies for you to download if there isn't even a computer drive that can read them yet?
September 18, 2006 1:28:32 AM

well think about it lik this, ppl can take an hddvd, digitally record the video with a media pc and host it on a p2p server

u dont need a state of the art system for dvds obviously, but buy something that can upgrade into a top of the line system and that isnt hard and dual core systems are cheap

wat is the most amount of money u can use for a comp rite now?
September 18, 2006 1:49:06 AM

I'd like to spend less than $200 on the CPU, motherboard, memory, and video card combined. I could get this for $100 on eBay:

Socket 370 motherboard
1.2Ghz Tualatin Celeron CPU
512MB PC-100 memory
FX5200 AGP video card

Here's the part I don't understand:

"take an hddvd, digitally record the video with a media pc"

How can anyone do that if no computer drives currently on the market will read an HD-DVD?
September 18, 2006 2:04:46 AM

remember u can also record off of the tv, hd signal onto media comps and that will stil hav digital quality, im not too sure about all the details, blu ray there are already drives, i havnt got into the whole hd thing yet so i dont kno a lot, but if u cant spend a lot of money now, dont bother

build up around 800 and u can get a comp great for watching hd tv at ur resolution, once dx10 comes out current gen vid cards lik the 7600gt and x1800gto will drop
September 18, 2006 2:15:50 AM

Yeah there seem to be Blu-Ray burners out now for ~$1000. I didn't know that. Maybe by the time the price drops a computer that can play a Blu-Ray disc will be cheap too.

Also, I don't see how anyone can record "off of the TV" in any method other than analog. I've never seen a digital-out for video on a TV. A Blu-Ray drive is all you need anyway.
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2006 2:25:12 AM

Quote:
Come on now. A P3-1.2Ghz with 512MB RAM and a 64MB video card won't be able to satisfactorily play back DVDs in Linux?

C'mon what century are you in? DVDs didnt even exist back then. Go buy yourself a Core 2 Extreme x6800 with 4gb RAM and 2x1900xtx's (crossfire of course) and a SB X-FI elite pro. Then whack it all on an Asus P5W-DH Deluxe ....... Blah Blah Blah lots more Intel fanboy rubbish.

No you really need to spend more than $200 if you want to play DVDs "satisfactorily". But it kind of depends on how you perceive "satisfactorily". I guess you want it to run smooth tho. I dont watch DVDs on my system so I dont really know what you would need to run at that res "satisfactorily"
September 18, 2006 2:28:49 AM

Quote:
C'mon what century are you in? DVDs didnt even exist back then.
That's not true; my first DVD capable PC was a Pentium 2 350MHz with 64MB of RAM.
September 18, 2006 2:32:59 AM

Quote:
I'd like to spend less than $200 on the CPU, motherboard, memory, and video card combined. I could get this for $100 on eBay:

Socket 370 motherboard
1.2Ghz Tualatin Celeron CPU
512MB PC-100 memory
FX5200 AGP video card

I pretty much have this system (I'm typing on it right now) and it plays back DVDs under Windows XP just fine. It doesn't mean that their at the highest quality (I use Windows Media Player), but provided that your Linux OS isn't a resource hog, DVD playback should work just fine. Now, HD video, or streaing TV...those aren't going to happen on this rig.

ABIT ST6-RAID (Socket 370)
Intel Celeron 1.10A @ 1.46GHz (Tualatin Core)
eVGA GeForce 6600 AGP
512Mb Crucial PC-133 SDRAM
And so on...
September 18, 2006 2:40:08 AM

I'm sure it will do just fine with DVD. My current Celeron-700 with 192MB and 4MB onboard video plays DVDs almost perfectly. This boost will surely make for perfect playback.

Where do you find streaming TV?
September 18, 2006 2:44:21 AM

I meant installing a TV Tuner and hooking up your computer to your cable TV line. Perhaps it's just my computer, but whenever I try to stream video or a large interactive site off of the internet, my computer completly freezes after about five minutes.

As far as perfomance goes, I hear that Linux under 64 bit doesn't suck like Windows does. Have you ever thought about slapping together a cheap AMD PC to take advantage of this?
September 18, 2006 2:48:11 AM

How cheap? :)  I need motherboard, CPU, memory, and video card.
September 18, 2006 2:57:10 AM

I'm working on the list.
I know I can make a good list for less than $350, but I'm working with your desire to spend less than $200.
September 18, 2006 3:00:40 AM

RIght on, eBay is fine with me by the way. Could the system you're building play back HD video?
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2006 3:09:06 AM

Quote:
I'm sure it will do just fine with DVD. My current Celeron-700 with 192MB and 4MB onboard video plays DVDs almost perfectly. This boost will surely make for perfect playback.

Where do you find streaming TV?

If it plays fine then why upgrade? BTW I cant actually remember when DVDs came out ok so dont flame me about my last post.
September 18, 2006 3:14:02 AM

This TG Daily article claims that HD video is brutal for most PCs.
http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/28/nvidia_hdcp_graphics_card_presentation/

Now here's what I'm thinking. I'm working with a Socket 939 system, ourfitteld with an Athlon 64 3000+ and 512MB of Kingston DDR. This probably won't do HD video, at least according to the article I referenced. The difficult point is the motherboard. If you can live with integrated video, I can probably keep the cost under $200. However, it will still have a PCIe 16x slot for future upgradability. What do you think?
September 18, 2006 4:05:15 AM

It sounds like even the system you're talking about won't play HD video. Maybe it would be smarter to buy a cheap system for DVD playback now, and buy an HD-capable system when it's cheaper. Maybe around the same time a Blu-Ray or HD-DVD drive is cheaper.

I don't think there's any point in buying a more-capable system than I need right now if I'll have to buy another system to play HD video anyway.

Also, it's too bad that "the lack of a complete chain of devices supporting HDCP (High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection)" will keep you from playing Blu-Ray or HD-DVD discs.

edit: I wonder if the system you're talking about could play HD video with just a video card upgrade when the time comes....
September 18, 2006 2:06:59 PM

Mex, could you give me the details on the system you're put together here?
September 18, 2006 2:51:05 PM

If you are going to use the tualatin celeron I would recomend you get PC133 memory. I have a system with one of these processors and it runs fine at 120 FSB and a standard cooler. This gives you 20% overclock. CPU temp on a warm day is less than 40C so its not running hot and mines been running like this now for over 3 years. PC133 memory is usualy the same price as PC100 so it should not cost you any more. Check that the mother board you are buying supports the tualatin CPUs, only the later socket 370 boards support this CPU.

What the system will then playback will depend on how compressed the the video is. Playback of some AVIs on my machine is fine, but only if that is all its doing. My system has onboard graphics however so I would not expect much of it. Decompressing a heavily compressed HD is a very CPU and graphics card intensive.

You can find short clips of files encoded for HD video on the net, you could download one of these files and see how it plays back on your present machine, using you present monitor. This will give you an idea of what possible.

Just my 2p worth

Rob Murphy
September 18, 2006 3:04:47 PM

Thanks Rob,

I think that's good advice. Can you recommend a motherboard or brand of motherboard? Obviously I need something that will let me set the FSB. I can't wait to get off this locked down Dell.

I absolutely can not use any sort of CPU fan though. The only fan allowed in my system is the power supply fan and I'll make sure that's super quiet before I buy. This system is going in the living room and I need to not hear it.
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2006 5:11:20 PM

The FX5200 will not support PureVideo so you lose some added assistance that would be available from the GF6200 that Heyyou recommended, look hard enough and there are a ton of GF6200 with passive cooling.

The X1300 would be another nice choice, but more expensive, and not worth it for this low level requirement.

Go FX5200 if you have no other choice, bu the quality is mediocre at best, the GF6200 is a better risk IMO and with more features.



Thus end my 2 post flourish from Toronto. :twisted:
September 18, 2006 5:23:16 PM

The 6200 looks like it's maybe $5 more expensive on the low end from newegg.com so I'll go with one of those. PureVideo sounds like what I need. Any reason to think the X1300 would make an difference?
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