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New PC - build Vs buy "Dell"?

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September 17, 2006 5:01:56 PM

Hi,
I'm planning to build/get a new PC and am trying to figure out whether to build one (as I've done in the past) or buy one from Dell.
I'm looking at
E6600 + 2GB + 512MB vid card (7900GTX possibly.
I got the parts scoped out at newegg

* Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail $329.00
* Intel BOXDG965RYCK Socket T (LGA 775) Intel G965 Express ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $119.99
* CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model TWIN2X2048-6400 - Retail $299.00
* Antec TRUEPOWERII TPII-550 ATX12V 550W Power Supply - Retail $89.99
* eVGA 512-P2-N572-AR Geforce 7900GTX 512MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 Video Card - Retail $398.99
* LITE-ON 16X DVD±R DVD Burner Black ATAPI/E-IDE Model SHW-160P6S-04 - Retail $32.99
The total here works out to $1,269.96 (before tax/shipping). (Note that I've not included a HDD or a Floppy drive or monitor or keyboard/mouse or OS)

Just for kicks, I tried to configure a Dell XPS 410 (I realize that their the RAM & PSU are not going to be as good as what I have selected) Their total (including a 320GB SATA drive, OS (media center), 19" LCD (analog) monitor and FDD) worked out to $1490.

(If I select the "256MB nVidia Geforce 7300LE TurboCache" option at Dell, my price drops down by $550. I could even throw that card away and buy a new 7900GTX from newegg for under $400 and cut the cost at Dell to $1340)

Am I missing something here or does Dell actually work out to be cheaper (by the time I add the OS, monitor, HDD etc)??
I knew that Dell could not be beaten on low end PCs, but I wouldn't call this a 'low-end' pc...

Any suggestions (to keep me from going over to the 'Dark side') would be appreciated.

Thanks!

More about : build buy dell

September 17, 2006 5:14:59 PM

Dell offer is good if you are not going to OC your pc.But i think dell mobos not provide support for the OC.my advice is try dell baby with 7300 and then add
7900GTx(Your Garentee may void)
September 17, 2006 5:33:27 PM

I think you're on to something... it's always looked like (to me at least) that Dell barely breaks even on the base PCs... but it makes a KILLING on the upgrades an options. That said... I still think you're giving up a little in terms of other components... memory... mobo... case... cooling... all will likely be inferior to what you'd buy on your own.
September 17, 2006 5:41:44 PM

Well, for those who think that dell doesn't break even you guys are crazy. Components aren't all that you must look at. Remember that with dell your sound card probably will suck, hell, I'll bet it will be onboard. You need to make sure that all of your components and I mean all are equally matched. So for that system I wouldn't go with less than xfi extreme music but that is not the crux of my argument against dell. Remember you are going to get an OS, however, what will happen is that it will be included on a fat32 partition on your hd. This blows because if you want to do a full format you can't because you have to reload from that restore partition which includes the mountain of shit programs that dell advertises. This really sucks dude. Plus 90% of bios options will be locked. Plus the rest of the shit is all SUPER low quality. Also just because it advertises those components the mb is dell. Now, I used to be a dell guy in fact there are 3 dell computers in the family but that shit is over. The last one which was a mid upper level xps b series was an absolute dud. Man I will never buy from those fools again. That computer does things for which I will never understand and all of those that I have built for myself and a few friends work like a well oiled machine. You don't know whats under the hood of a dell my friend and by that I dont mean the component I mean the manufacturer. If you are buying a warrant then knock yourself out but read the small print because many times they reserve the right to send remanufactured goods. Good luck man
September 17, 2006 5:47:04 PM

I agree with the above poster that Dell views the hard drive as an income generator... I spent 20 minutes unloading software that came preloaded on my Dell laptop the first day I had it... Dell didn't put that software there for my benefit... they were paid to put it there by McAfee and various other companies. That said... I don't think Dell is as evil as the above poster makes them out to be. If you're going to buy a system from a builder, there is no one cheaper out there... at least not the last time I checked.

I built my own desktop and bought a Dell laptop.
September 17, 2006 6:00:53 PM

Onboard sound is fine for the majority of people. X-FI may be great in the future, but right now its under-utilised and so overpriced.

As for the ranting about the backup partition, get Partition Magic and it'll be wiped in about 10 seconds. From within Windows.. that was difficult.

Personally, I'd go for the build option, but I'm not going to try to influence you by saying "ZOMGzorz, Dell = SATAN".

Synergy6
September 17, 2006 6:15:35 PM

The problem with the Dell partition is that they don't give you the installation media... you gotta pay extra for the stupid CD. That is pretty crappy if you ask me.
September 17, 2006 7:17:59 PM

You are telling me! I think that if you are paying for the stuff anyhow that you should get a cd with the drivers along with a full version cd of xp. If that was the case then I would say go ahead and do the dell deal if you don't mind generic components. For me I prefer to have name brand shit in my computer! I just had one of my Ocz mem modules go out. Those people didn't even want a receipt to replace it. The just sent me over a form and had me send it back and then 2 day fedex the new modules back to me. Try to do that with DELL! You'll want to kill someone after the hastle they will give you. On that not once again I specify.............Build it yourself!!
September 17, 2006 7:35:12 PM

Quote:
Hi,
I'm planning to build/get a new PC and am trying to figure out whether to build one (as I've done in the past) or buy one from Dell.
I'm looking at
E6600 + 2GB + 512MB vid card (7900GTX possibly.
I got the parts scoped out at newegg

* Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail $329.00
* Intel BOXDG965RYCK Socket T (LGA 775) Intel G965 Express ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $119.99
* CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model TWIN2X2048-6400 - Retail $299.00
* Antec TRUEPOWERII TPII-550 ATX12V 550W Power Supply - Retail $89.99
* eVGA 512-P2-N572-AR Geforce 7900GTX 512MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 Video Card - Retail $398.99
* LITE-ON 16X DVD±R DVD Burner Black ATAPI/E-IDE Model SHW-160P6S-04 - Retail $32.99
The total here works out to $1,269.96 (before tax/shipping). (Note that I've not included a HDD or a Floppy drive or monitor or keyboard/mouse or OS)

Just for kicks, I tried to configure a Dell XPS 410 (I realize that their the RAM & PSU are not going to be as good as what I have selected) Their total (including a 320GB SATA drive, OS (media center), 19" LCD (analog) monitor and FDD) worked out to $1490.

(If I select the "256MB nVidia Geforce 7300LE TurboCache" option at Dell, my price drops down by $550. I could even throw that card away and buy a new 7900GTX from newegg for under $400 and cut the cost at Dell to $1340)

Am I missing something here or does Dell actually work out to be cheaper (by the time I add the OS, monitor, HDD etc)??
I knew that Dell could not be beaten on low end PCs, but I wouldn't call this a 'low-end' pc...

Any suggestions (to keep me from going over to the 'Dark side') would be appreciated.

Thanks!

This may not work out well as Dell adds in a higher cost PSU on the high end GPU's. The PSU with the 7300LE may not support the 7900GTX. I would suggest you wait till the DX10 GPU's for this upgrade. The Dell PSU will limit your upgrade choices on DX10 GPU's.
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Nvidia-ATI-Launch-G80-an...

Dell's mobo is only a 4GB version and the build you made has a 8GB mobo. The 4GB mobo will shorten the life of your system by 18 to 24 months. The G965 is the newest mobo chipset, which Dells mobo may not have, and may be your only shot at support for real quad core late next year.

If you cut your memory by $100 and your PSU by $50 you'll have what Dell is offering and that would buy your OS and HD. Its true you cant compete for price but quality is why we build our own. I would only buy a Dell if it was the cheapest system they offer, as you expect what you get with those, and they have most of the parts of their better systems.
September 17, 2006 8:30:23 PM

Dude, that was an awesome insight that I hadn't thought of. I would listen to Elbert dude, he has a great point. If you really must have a new system right now which is perfectly fine then hell build it yourself and get a nice PS. Good luck in your endeavor. He is right low end it good to buy from a manufacturer. However, even then, if it is for yourself and not a friend or relative even low end I would recommend to build it yourself. Rest assured that it will be a real big piece o' .... if it is cheap. One motif I have found to exist in technology and everyone on these forumz worth their salt will tell you......you get what you pay for in regards to technology
September 17, 2006 11:26:56 PM

Quote:
Dell does work out to be cheaper. But the problem is the only upgrade path you will have is Video and RAM. If you upgrade the video you may need to upgrade the PSU but you won't be able to upgrade the PSU. Dell's PSU's and Motherboards are not standard ATX when it comes to the wireing of the power cables. If you plan on gaming then build your own. If you do basic office type things then a Dell should last you a while.


Funny! That and the memory is the only thing you can upgrade on a Dell! OK, my Antec SP 500w fits on the Dell case perfectly AND fits my parts and everything. The Dell PSU's are not proprietary. They are normal.
September 17, 2006 11:27:57 PM

At some point Dell did use proprietary power supplies... the connector was the same as a standard ATX connector, but it was wired out differently... definitely caused problems for some people. I believe Dell gave up that practice though.
September 17, 2006 11:31:42 PM

To respond ...

You learn more when you build it yourself, you have more fun when you build it yourself, you feel complete when you build it yourself ... I can also personally say you know what broke when you built it yourself .. :) 

Build it yourself ...

I find nothing more exciting than actually building something very powerful and having it work for many years ...
September 18, 2006 12:08:17 AM

you shouldn't even be asking yourself that question. when you go high end, most of the time custom build is the best scenario if your looking to save money. Dell highly overcharges for any upgrades and gives you a lot of things in their computers that you don't really need.

This is what I tell all of my friends when they are planning to spend a decent amount on a computer.
I'd rather spend money on quality parts made by reliable manufacturer's, save the money on things I don't need, spend on the things I do, and not have to worry about things going wrong because I know I picked the right parts in the first place.
I'm not saying Dell + others don't use quality parts, i'm saying wouldn't you rather know what your getting in your computer and have the freedom to change a part without paying an additional charge?

"dude, i'm getting a dell"
"dude....don't"
September 18, 2006 12:12:04 AM

If you've built computers in the past, like you said you did, then buying a prebuilt, especially a Dell, is a bad idea unless you are getting crazy discounts.

I've owned/purchased 2 Dells for my family (one for parents, one for sister). I've even owned one, long before I was computer savy. Here are my major complaints about Dell:

-PSU almost always underpowered (and used to be proprietory... no matter what anyone says I will NOT try to change PSUs without looking at the schematics very closely)

-Airflow... I mean wtf.. using one 90mm exhaust fan to cool the entire case (including the CPU).

-Motherboard BIOS allows for absolutly no overclocking whatsoever

-Motherboard heatsink clamps are propritory. (no after market HSF's)

-Front USB on new mid-ranged model sucks ass, they have easily bendable, underpowered pins.

-Want to change the case? Forget about it.

-RAM is usually cheap, high latency, etc

-Very little expansion room, 1 more hard drive and 1 more CD/DVD drive max.


Now for the positive:

- I've never had a problem with their customer service, had many things replaced easily and quickly.

-Cheap I guess

- You can get a nice LCD for cheap w/ upgrade


Overall I would build it... That list was of dells that I've played with, they might have changed a few thigns since then but all those things apply to my sisters Dell that I bought about 6 months ago.
September 18, 2006 3:22:41 PM

I'm working on the second Dell computer this year that I have purchased for friends. On the first, I paid $10 for the XP reinstall CD, but I went to Dell online chat and they shipped me the apps and misc other CDs free. On the latest one (XPS 410), the XP CD came free and I just went to online chat and they are shipping the apps and other CDs free.

As for my next PC, I've been on the fence for weeks now. I had a system all planned out, but I've read so many "my new build won't POST" threads that I'm leery. I also don't want to toast the manufacturer's warranty, so I probably won't overclock for at least a year. Then I heard that you can't use any power management (like SpeedStep) if you overclock? That means the CPU will always be running full bore, even when it's not doing much? As for Dell not using quality components, they may be cheap, but I've never had any real failures on any Dells. (My 5 year old P4 1.5 GHz had an issue with recognizing the slave drive on the primary IDE channel, so I tossed in an IDE card that came free with a Maxtor drive and all is well.)

Anyway, I may learn a lot building it myself, but if one of those things is "I could be enjoying my computer today instead of tinkering with it", it may not be worth the risk. Do I really need to understand if 4-4-4-12 is better than 5-5-5-15 or whatever?
September 18, 2006 4:18:06 PM

Quote:
Do I really need to understand if 4-4-4-12 is better than 5-5-5-15 or whatever?

Do you really want to have the best system possible?
September 18, 2006 4:33:26 PM

Quote:
Do I really need to understand if 4-4-4-12 is better than 5-5-5-15 or whatever?

Do you really want to have the best system possible?

Actually, no I don't. I only want a stable, "good enough" system. Good enough such that the marginal utility of improvement is outweighed by the cost of the improvement in terms of time and expense. Otherwise, I'd just clear out my savings account and get the baddest, fastest machine available!

Granted, you could argue that the amount of reading required to tweak the RAM timings would be minimal, but if that's the case, then why can't one of the experts simply TELL me what is best based on the components I am using?
September 18, 2006 4:43:16 PM

I am suprised that no one has mentioned warrenty yet. Aside from the CPU everything inside my homebuilt case came with at least a 3 year warrenty - for free. A 3 year warrenty on the parts for that dell will be a bit more expensive. Granted you have to do your own troubleshooting but there are great places like this forum to help.

The PSU is another big issue. Its rare to have a PSU from the big box companies that has lots of extra capacity - not to mention that they will go back and forth between proprietary PSUs and standard. The only way to know that for sure is to open on up and look at the PSU
September 18, 2006 4:48:25 PM

Because 'Best' is a subjective term that varies among individuals.
EX: Both of these RAM sticks will work and are stable. One has a lower latency but is $75 more. Is that latency worth $75? What about $50? To some people it might be and would then be the 'best'.

Recommendations can be made but only your reactions and experiances once you actually have the component and see the results can determine 'best'. Even then, the likelyhood of you being able to compare two systems exactly the same except for the ram to see the difference is slim. So its less of an exact science of 'pick that one' and more of an educated guess like 'people who do similar things TEND to like that one better' (which may or may not be true for you)
September 18, 2006 5:04:06 PM

Quote:
Because 'Best' is a subjective term that varies among individuals.
EX: Both of these RAM sticks will work and are stable. One has a lower latency but is $75 more. Is that latency worth $75? What about $50? To some people it might be and would then be the 'best'.

Recommendations can be made but only your reactions and experiances once you actually have the component and see the results can determine 'best'. Even then, the likelyhood of you being able to compare two systems exactly the same except for the ram to see the difference is slim. So its less of an exact science of 'pick that one' and more of an educated guess like 'people who do similar things TEND to like that one better' (which may or may not be true for you)


Actually, my question was rhetorical. I guess it was just overly subtle! I realize there is no one "best" answer, but it's just not an area I want to devote my time to at the moment. Much like people who like to "chip" their cars to get more horsepower, etc. Sure I COULD spend the time to learn it, or I can just do the basic maintenance, add gas, and go. Even if I were to build my system, for the most part, I am just looking for gas-n-go and I don't want to EVER see the equivalent of the "check engine" light!

Thanks.
September 18, 2006 5:07:03 PM

Quote:
I am suprised that no one has mentioned warrenty yet. Aside from the CPU everything inside my homebuilt case came with at least a 3 year warrenty - for free. A 3 year warrenty on the parts for that dell will be a bit more expensive. Granted you have to do your own troubleshooting but there are great places like this forum to help.

The PSU is another big issue. Its rare to have a PSU from the big box companies that has lots of extra capacity - not to mention that they will go back and forth between proprietary PSUs and standard. The only way to know that for sure is to open on up and look at the PSU


You do make a great point on the warranty, and that has crossed my mind. On the bright side, I've only had one component issue in one of my several Dells over the years, and it was easily worked around at that.

In any event, your point is valid and must be considered.
September 18, 2006 5:24:51 PM

You don't build a PC for yourself because you can do it cheaper. Most of the time you can't.

You do it because you can do whatever the hell you want and its fun. You do it for more control over your cooler looking hardware. You do it because you can....
September 18, 2006 5:32:34 PM

I don't grow my own food nor cobble my own shoes. I do what I (hopefully) do well in my job and then I use that money to pay others to do for me that which I prefer not to do (or cannot do) for myself.

If I were a single man with copious free time, I'm CERTAIN I would build my own. But, since I am NOT: Dude, I'm gettin' a Dell. :wink:
September 18, 2006 5:43:59 PM

Quote:

You do it because you can do whatever the hell you want and its fun.


Another good point. It was really fun to build my computer - really fun. There were a couple of 'Oh $hit!' moments - like when the CPU went flying out from its packaging (Thank you intel for the pin cover!) but when it was all said and done I had a blast and learned some things.

Now, if only there was a good way to deal with the depression that sets in with the knowladge that it will be a while before I can do this again :) 

bmgoodman: Sorry I missed your earlier point. As for the time - hey I'm a married man who works 65 hours a week and I did it. Just take a day or two off when the wife/gf has to work and do it :D 
September 18, 2006 6:00:53 PM

Do what you gotta do :) 

I didn't say you should build your own.

Just saying now that the big OEMs have huge buying power and low prices, people now do it for different reasons that they used to.

People used to do it to save money, now the OEMs are tough to beat and places like Future Shop may only make $30-50 on a new PC.

Many online PC component sites offer to build and install the OS on your custom PC for a small fee (like $25) which saves a lot of time, but you still often cannot build one cheaper than Dell or HP/Compaq.

For myself, I love building machines and seeing what they can do. But I often have the time, unlike yourself.
September 18, 2006 6:12:48 PM

All of these points are valid, but in the end, it's up to you. If you don't feel comfortable building your own PC then fine. I am 17 now and I built my own PC when I was 15 which a lot of people say is pretty good.
I am very glad I did, I had a lot of fun doing it, sure there have been minor problems, but I've only had two (power supply with case wasn't very good + brand new motherboard was defective after upgrading latley).
If money is not as big an issue to you and you don't mind getting a little less performance but knowing whatever goes wrong is covered then thats fine.

What I learned and continue to learn about building computers I enjoy it. It taught me a lot and now I can usually troubleshoot any problems I have on my own even fixing friends computers.

If you have the time and want to learn something new, maybe even save some money, it's definatly a good experience. If you just want a computer that works that gets the job done, thats what computer manufacturers are for.
Whatever option you choose, I'm sure you'll be happy, and who know's, there's always the future. :D 
September 18, 2006 6:19:24 PM

I'll be brief. I own a Dell that I'm still getting good service out of but.....as my computer knowledge grew, so did my frustration at the lack of "upgradability".

I finally built my own in February and have been extremely satisfied with the results. The feeling of accomplishment is worth quite a bit to me.

Good luck. :wink:
September 18, 2006 6:29:35 PM

Quote:
I don't grow my own food nor cobble my own shoes. I do what I (hopefully) do well in my job and then I use that money to pay others to do for me that which I prefer not to do (or cannot do) for myself.

If I were a single man with copious free time, I'm CERTAIN I would build my own. But, since I am NOT: Dude, I'm gettin' a Dell. :wink:


Good for you, a wise choice for most people (although I'd buy a HP). But, for the hobbyist and the gaming crowd, nothing compares with "rollin your own".

Plus, if you don't build your own, there's nothing to brag or bitch about on these forums. :lol: 
September 18, 2006 6:33:30 PM

Quote:

You do it because you can do whatever the hell you want and its fun.


Just take a day or two off when the wife/gf has to work and do it :D  Or better still, get her a 2nd job and take all the time you need! 8) 8)
September 18, 2006 7:51:30 PM

Anand Tech just posted a review of the XPS410
Here
September 19, 2006 12:17:56 AM

Wow! thanks for the insights!
My primary use for this pc is not gaming (I do play games on my pc,but that's not the primary use - primarily to be used for software development), but I do intend to upgrade to Vista when it is available, so I'd like to get a fairly good GPU. I also do intend to get a 24" monitor,so (again) the GPU needs to be failrly decent.

Based on your inputs, I guess I'll be building my own comp this time (again). Do you think the parts I've picked are decent enough? I need some help in picking a decent case (active cooling) and a RAID 0/1/5 card (unless the mobo includes it already). Also, are there any BTX boards available for the conroe?

Thanks again - esp for the review of the XPS410!

Almost forgot - any suggestions on some (reliable) budget SATA DVD burners too?
September 19, 2006 12:55:52 AM

If you want a great warrenty, get the dell and upgrade to 3-year NBD in-home service. Otherwise--even as an ex-employee, I can tell you that a gaming PC would be much better when built...BUT ONLY IF BUILT PROPERLY :) 

I emphasize that because building your first PC will in many ways be a roll of the dice. In customising your own system, you may find a previously unknown incompatibility between two hardware components. On the other hand, it may turn out to be a killer deal. Get ready for potential headaches if you build your own, and praise God if you get it to boot the first time. If you are unwilling or unable to spend hours troubleshooting phantom-hardware issues, you may just need to get the dell.
September 19, 2006 2:30:04 AM

I understand what you are saying. I have some experience in building systems in the past - both budget and high-end, so I'm not a complete novice to this. I currently run a Prescott core P4 (Raid 1 320GBx2 Seagate SAT 3.0 + 500GB Seagate SATA 3.0, 2GB XMS) and it noisy/hot (despite the aftermarket cooler) - so I thought I'd upgrade to the conroe (besides, my video card needed to upgrade as well)
This time, when I looked at the cost of the components, I thought I'd check what Dell offers and was surprised! So, I thought I'd check with fellow enthusiasts to see what their thoughts were :) 

By posting the list of components, I was hoping that someone would point out any potential incompatibilities :) 
September 19, 2006 1:47:14 PM

Quote:
Dell does work out to be cheaper. But the problem is the only upgrade path you will have is Video and RAM. If you upgrade the video you may need to upgrade the PSU but you won't be able to upgrade the PSU. Dell's PSU's and Motherboards are not standard ATX when it comes to the wireing of the power cables. If you plan on gaming then build your own. If you do basic office type things then a Dell should last you a while.


That is no longer true. Beginning in September 2004 Dell began to use industry standard ATX 2.0 PSUs.
September 19, 2006 2:16:50 PM

A potential positive point for the Conroe right now is that the current selection of mobos is reaching maturity so most the problems have been ironed out but the CPU is still recent enough that there aren't 80 billion mobo choices yet. Heck, most mobo's have their own thread. This means that its pretty easy to see other people who are building/have built a near identical system and can get info and ideas off of them - not to mention their overclocking settings.

Also I have found many people here (and at other tech forums) are willing to comment on your choices esp if you show you've done research and ask politely
September 19, 2006 2:29:15 PM

Well I broke down this year and bought a Dell, I have built my own systems up to now but this time I felt lazy and didn't want to price out everything. So I bought the XPS700 and got a great deal that I couldn't pass up, price of system before discount over 2800, I paid 1450 and to top it off they screwed up my order in a good way and gave me the upgraded red version. I got a Core 2 Duo 6300, 2gigs of ram, 160g raptor, dual 7900gs cards, XFI sound, 1000kw PSU, 4 year in home warranty, 4 year parts and 4 year phone support and other junk that I can't remember off of the top of my head.

Bad part is that it has a BTX motherboard and who knows what the future will be on that.
September 19, 2006 3:03:38 PM

Quote:
Based on your inputs, I guess I'll be building my own comp this time (again). Do you think the parts I've picked are decent enough? I need some help in picking a decent case (active cooling) and a RAID 0/1/5 card (unless the mobo includes it already). Also, are there any BTX boards available for the conroe?


I suggest getting a XION case, or any other case that has 120mm fans in the front and rear of the case.

--Shodar
September 19, 2006 6:02:26 PM

im on my 2nd dell which is still running strong (from 04). my next one will be custom built but the dell still hasnt failed me. at the last lan i went to i got some funny looks from the others but that soon changed when they asked me to run the cod2 server while i play. i was hosting and playing with no lag while others couldnt even get the game to run! :lol: 
September 19, 2006 6:57:10 PM

Quote:
im on my 2nd dell which is still running strong (from 04). my next one will be custom built but the dell still hasnt failed me. at the last lan i went to i got some funny looks from the others but that soon changed when they asked me to run the cod2 server while i play. i was hosting and playing with no lag while others couldnt even get the game to run! :lol: 


Most people have either a tremendously positive experience or a tremendously negative experience with Dell, from what I hear. While I admit they definately have their share of problems, all in all, of the OEM PC manufacturers out there, my experience has been best with Dell, my worst experience was with Packard Bell--no need to elaborate on that though :wink:
September 19, 2006 7:11:39 PM

It depends on whether you want a warranty or not, and whether you care if your OS is licensed or not. Dell will undoubtedly have licensed software, and I think that E510 has the 1 year economy warranty (aka return to depot probably)

Secondly, I don't think all onboard sound is bad, most are more than adequate nowadays (some are really good), and the only drawback is minimal CPU load.

The other is that Dells are engineered as systems so everything from cooling and noise are factored in. Generally, a Dell will be quieter than what you build, given equal specs and you can just about bet that your CPU will never overheat in a Dell, despite not having a bajillion fans whirring.

Last, if a 7900GTX is an option, the PSU in the Dell will handle the upgrade if you decide to just throw in a 7300. Dell designs to what is necessary, not over engineering. Which is how we SHOULD be building, and not wasting electricity on a 600W PSU for a computer to surf the web on...
!