Need replacement for Epson C60

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The C60 I rescued from a skip has finally given up the ghost. Fed up with
clogging as we don't use it a whole lot. Uses too much ink in cleaning
cycles and had it with taking the damn thing apart and getting ink
everywhere! Looking for a replacement. Need it for some light home text
printing, letters, shopping
lists etc and some photo stuff onto photo paper. Not looking for anything
special. I'll be using generic cartridges
Noticed the Epson C66 is pretty cheap and looks like it's the next one
up from the C60. But does it clog?

Any thoughts or warnings before I leap in?

Les


--
Remove Frontal Lobes to reply.

"...The people can always be brought to the bidding of the
leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being
attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism, and
exposing the country to greater danger "

-- Herman Goering at the Nuremberg trials

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

- Benjamin Franklin, 1759
13 answers Last reply
More about need replacement epson
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Simply a Canon ip4000 or ip5000 without any doubt.

    I had a C62, that clogged within 2 day's the print head went shortly
    after and the replacement clogged at the 4th day, all with Epson
    inks.

    I was'nt going to buy another Epson and intended to get a Canon and
    was dubious about an ip5000 after my experience, clog after clog who
    can blame me. The reason I was dubious I thought 'finer heads = more
    clogs' - How very wrong I was.

    You can deduce I took the bait and ended with a ip5000, the ip4000 is
    the same apart from the 1pl printing option on 'Photo paper pro'
    saetting, I say this because it will only print at this resolution at
    this setting.

    It's over 3 months old and not one single clog nor manual print head
    clean required yet, mind you I am using Canon inks.

    The text is as good as my laser and just as fast after the laser has
    warmed up, it's economical and the ink tanks are clear and easily
    refillable if you are into this, the tanks are not 'chipped' .

    With the Epson I had to check every print even with text documents,
    with the Canon I don't have to and get 100% prints all the time,
    where the Epsons 'guzzles' ink the Canon uses it.

    I would have no hesitation in buying another, I can't say that for
    Epson.

    The skip being the best place for it, "don't get clogged with an
    Epson"

    Davy
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > Noticed the Epson C66 is pretty cheap and looks like it's the next one
    > up from the C60. But does it clog?

    it clogs more than the C60, because of pigmented inks. If you buy an epson
    prefer the R200 or for low volume the C46.


    --
    Yianni
    in@mailbox9.gr (remove number nine to reply)


    --
    "Les Hemmings" <les.frontalclaire@lobesvirgin.net> wrote in message
    news:3oauodF51indU1@individual.net...
    >
    > The C60 I rescued from a skip has finally given up the ghost. Fed up with
    > clogging as we don't use it a whole lot. Uses too much ink in cleaning
    > cycles and had it with taking the damn thing apart and getting ink
    > everywhere! Looking for a replacement. Need it for some light home text
    > printing, letters, shopping
    > lists etc and some photo stuff onto photo paper. Not looking for anything
    > special. I'll be using generic cartridges
    >
    > Any thoughts or warnings before I leap in?
    >
    > Les
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Remove Frontal Lobes to reply.
    >
    > "...The people can always be brought to the bidding of the
    > leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being
    > attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism, and
    > exposing the country to greater danger "
    >
    > -- Herman Goering at the Nuremberg trials
    >
    > "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    > temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    >
    > - Benjamin Franklin, 1759
    >
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    <I>The Canon ip5000 is over 3 months old and not one single duff print
    yet</I>

    I can claim no duff prints on my iP3000, it has been duff free

    I can claim one duff print on my mp760 which is like the ip4000 in
    printhead. My cyan did enjoy a clog... after it's 4th refill (2oz).
    In all fairness both printers are using aftermarket ink, that *could*
    be a factor, and after several hundrad CDs printed which is hard for
    the head could also be a factor. Or it could be normal for it to duff
    after 2oz of ink. I actually had to do a deep cleaning.

    My r200 duffed often and well. The ratio of good print to duffed ones
    were high. If I didn't use it often enough, it would duff. If I used
    it too often it would duff. It was the most duffable printer I ever
    owned.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Go to Ciao or somewhere like that and have a look on various forums,
    you'll soon learn which printers to avoid.

    Don't rely on manufacturer and write up's, the best reviews are the
    user's which can be found on various shopping sites, I mentioned Ciao
    because it's my favourite if I want to find anything out.

    Personally I won't touch Epson after my experience, I would have
    understood my problems if I had been using 3rd party inks, I used
    genuine Epson ink and they still clogged.

    The Canon ip5000 is over 3 months old and not one single duff print
    yet.

    Davy
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I had several Epson printers which all clogged.
    The last one clogged even using Original Epson inks and on the third set.

    All printers will clog if not used regularly, however the CX5200 really gave
    me problems.
    I have now switched to a Canon iP4000 and the print quality is great.
    I would recommend a standard print once weekly with two documents.
    One being set for a small colour sample, and the other set for greyscale.
    That way you will run a small amount of ink through each nozzle - enough to
    keep the flow active.

    T
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > chinge ur spill chekker. da wurd is color and nit colour

    U after O except in America.

    I have no issues with those who spell the world colour. While 300
    million people are taught color... America is if i'm not mistaken the
    only English speaking nation that spells it that way.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > America, Canada and a couple of smaller nations. All up approximately 1.5
    > billion people speak English (half of these as a second language) and about 350
    > million spell colour without the U. The 76% that spell the word colour with a U
    > have been doing so for longer than the 24% have existed as nations. Having said
    > that I have no issue with how people choose to spell; I do have a problem with
    > those that are so single mindedly bigotted that they make no attempt to
    > understand other cultures and opinions.

    I don't know what Canadians are taught in school... I have met a few
    living in the states who make it a point to spell it colour.

    Your numbers seem reasonable, though i'm not sure about India as
    English seems to be the common tounge two people from different regions
    can use to reliably communicate. Finland is also another country where
    being literate in Finnish, Sweedish, and English is from what i'm told
    a prerequisite for graduation... so i'm not sure if you would call
    English a 2nd language in that case.

    I always felt that the primary issue was the fact that the first
    English dictionary was written sometime in the first quarter of the
    1604 IIRC. Robert Cawdrey's "Table Alphabeticall" I believe listed
    colour... and nothing with the letter J. Could have been worse, I
    believe Ben Franklin proposed a totally phonic spelling of English
    words to be the standard for America but it was decided that
    standardization was a better idea as it's hard enough for someone from
    New York to understand the spoken words from someone in Georga.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    ngreplies wrote:

    >I had several Epson printers which all clogged.
    >The last one clogged even using Original Epson inks and on the third set.
    >
    >All printers will clog if not used regularly, however the CX5200 really gave
    >me problems.
    >I have now switched to a Canon iP4000 and the print quality is great.
    >I would recommend a standard print once weekly with two documents.
    >One being set for a small colour
    >
    CHINGE UR SPILL CHEKER. DA WURD IS COLOR AND NIT COLOUR.

    > sample, and the other set for greyscale.
    >That way you will run a small amount of ink through each nozzle - enough to
    >keep the flow active.
    >
    >T
    >
    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> chinge ur spill chekker. da wurd is color and nit colour
    >
    >U after O except in America.
    >
    >I have no issues with those who spell the world colour. While 300
    >million people are taught color... America is if i'm not mistaken the
    >only English speaking nation that spells it that way.

    America, Canada and a couple of smaller nations. All up approximately 1.5
    billion people speak English (half of these as a second language) and about 350
    million spell colour without the U. The 76% that spell the word colour with a U
    have been doing so for longer than the 24% have existed as nations. Having said
    that I have no issue with how people choose to spell; I do have a problem with
    those that are so single mindedly bigotted that they make no attempt to
    understand other cultures and opinions.
    I enjoy your well balanced and well researched posts, keep up the good work.
    Tony
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > I think you should have jumped all over his butt
    > about some of the "facts." Not to get over an
    > argument of the "25 percent," I'll stick with just
    > the U.S. The fact that I dispute is "The 76% that
    > spell the word colour with a U have been doing so
    > for longer than the 24% have existed as nations."

    Well... the early dictionaries standarized them as colour... but
    spelling did differ from region to region. But frankly i'm not all
    that familar with early modern english so I couldn't tell you where we
    got the spelling for color.

    > American English changes faster than
    > any other brand as are usage is extremely
    > flexible.

    Really? I rather thought that words like fall, trash, and use of the
    word loan as a verb were throwbacks to the Elizabethan era and have not
    changed.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> America, Canada and a couple of smaller nations. All up approximately 1.5
    >> billion people speak English (half of these as a second language) and about
    >>350
    >> million spell colour without the U. The 76% that spell the word colour with
    >>a U
    >> have been doing so for longer than the 24% have existed as nations. Having
    >>said
    >> that I have no issue with how people choose to spell; I do have a problem
    >>with
    >> those that are so single mindedly bigotted that they make no attempt to
    >> understand other cultures and opinions.
    >
    >I don't know what Canadians are taught in school... I have met a few
    >living in the states who make it a point to spell it colour.
    >
    >Your numbers seem reasonable, though i'm not sure about India as
    >English seems to be the common tounge two people from different regions
    >can use to reliably communicate. Finland is also another country where
    >being literate in Finnish, Sweedish, and English is from what i'm told
    >a prerequisite for graduation... so i'm not sure if you would call
    >English a 2nd language in that case.
    >
    >I always felt that the primary issue was the fact that the first
    >English dictionary was written sometime in the first quarter of the
    >1604 IIRC. Robert Cawdrey's "Table Alphabeticall" I believe listed
    >colour... and nothing with the letter J. Could have been worse, I
    >believe Ben Franklin proposed a totally phonic spelling of English
    >words to be the standard for America but it was decided that
    >standardization was a better idea as it's hard enough for someone from
    >New York to understand the spoken words from someone in Georga.

    You could be right about Canada, I have assumed they generally spell the same
    way as Americans, if not then reduce the number of non U colour spellers by
    about 24 million (I think?). No allowance made for the couleur spellers from
    our French Canadian friends!
    We have many Indian friends and they tell me that English is very widely spoken
    there for the reason you stated and also because of the British colonial
    influence in the past.
    Tony
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    zakezuke wrote:
    >>America, Canada and a couple of smaller nations. All up approximately 1.5
    >>billion people speak English (half of these as a second language) and about 350
    >>million spell colour without the U. The 76% that spell the word colour with a U
    >>have been doing so for longer than the 24% have existed as nations. Having said
    >>that I have no issue with how people choose to spell; I do have a problem with
    >>those that are so single mindedly bigotted that they make no attempt to
    >>understand other cultures and opinions.
    >
    >
    > I don't know what Canadians are taught in school... I have met a few
    > living in the states who make it a point to spell it colour.
    >
    > Your numbers seem reasonable, though i'm not sure about India as
    > English seems to be the common tounge two people from different regions
    > can use to reliably communicate. Finland is also another country where
    > being literate in Finnish, Sweedish, and English is from what i'm told
    > a prerequisite for graduation... so i'm not sure if you would call
    > English a 2nd language in that case.
    >
    > I always felt that the primary issue was the fact that the first
    > English dictionary was written sometime in the first quarter of the
    > 1604 IIRC. Robert Cawdrey's "Table Alphabeticall" I believe listed
    > colour... and nothing with the letter J. Could have been worse, I
    > believe Ben Franklin proposed a totally phonic spelling of English
    > words to be the standard for America but it was decided that
    > standardization was a better idea as it's hard enough for someone from
    > New York to understand the spoken words from someone in Georga.
    >

    I think you should have jumped all over his butt
    about some of the "facts." Not to get over an
    argument of the "25 percent," I'll stick with just
    the U.S. The fact that I dispute is "The 76% that
    spell the word colour with a U have been doing so
    for longer than the 24% have existed as nations."

    Nations and governments are not the same thing but
    often are. What many people don't realize is that
    the government of the U.S. is one of the oldest in
    the world. The U.S. has had the same government
    since signing of the constitution. The government
    of England at that time is not the government of
    today. And certainly India as a nation is not the
    same as it was then and definitely the government
    isn't.

    I don't care how you spell colour. In fact that
    is the spelling I remember as a child because many
    of the books I read were either British authors or
    printers. American English changes faster than
    any other brand as are usage is extremely
    flexible. That causes problems, but it also makes
    it alive and is one of the reasons, along with
    technology development, that all of those
    non-English people speak English. Argue as you
    wish, but that fact is that those old colonial
    areas still speak English, not because of English
    colonialism, but because of airplanes, telephones,
    shipping, oil industries, etc. etc. Oh yes, did I
    mention the wars where the U.S. saved, the
    collective butts of (Oh go ahead, start naming
    them--then see how many of them teach English in
    schools).
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <%HGWe.3383$Ob2.1023@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com>,
    inkystinky@oem.com says...
    >
    >
    > ngreplies wrote:
    >
    > >I had several Epson printers which all clogged.
    > >The last one clogged even using Original Epson inks and on the third set.
    > >
    > >All printers will clog if not used regularly, however the CX5200 really gave
    > >me problems.
    > >I have now switched to a Canon iP4000 and the print quality is great.
    > >I would recommend a standard print once weekly with two documents.
    > >One being set for a small colour
    > >
    > CHINGE UR SPILL CHEKER. DA WURD IS COLOR AND NIT COLOUR.
    >
    Only in your little corner of the world.

    With a little education, you too could learn to spell like a native
    English speaker (and could figure out that mysterious caps lock key, you
    quarter-wit)
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