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i need to buy video card to video processing computer

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 20, 2006 5:12:06 PM

I need to buy a grapihc card to be good in a computer made for video editing and processing , what things i need to consider before buying.
thanks in advance..
September 20, 2006 6:07:46 PM

Consider your budget. How much can you afford to spend?

Consider your computer. What are the specs? Did you build it? Are you limited to AGP or PCIe?

Consider what you need to do? Simply encoding video? Or actually editing it?

For video editing, you don't really need all that powerful of a video card. You'd want one with at least 256MB of video memory, and you'd probably want one with 512MB if you have more than one monitor. Your CPU will have more of an impact on video editing than your video card.

Please provide more information when asking a question, so we can give you a proper answer.
September 20, 2006 7:04:39 PM

i'm advising someone about what computer to buy, in the worst case i'll build it, she wanted to buy :
AMD DualCore 4200+ AM2
MSI K9N nForce 550
1GB DDR2
GEFORCE 7300GS 256MB

but i first told her not to buy the DualCore 4200+, and to get the Intel Core 2 Duo e6400, its only 60$ diffrent and it worth it, i dont really know about the mother board but i guess its ok, i'll tell her to but 1gb of memory in one card, so upgrading will always be easy, the only thing i still dont know is what grapic card to tell her to buy, she has about 1150$.
does the Memory Interface make any diffrent about video editing/
video encoding is only been done by the prossesor.
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September 20, 2006 7:15:22 PM

mpilchfamily : what do you mean in graphic development?
September 20, 2006 7:28:57 PM

If she's going to do any video encoding, a better choice for a video card might be the Radeons X1300 or X1600 (any Radeon X1x00 card, really).

They have the capability of speeding up video encoding, which is nice...
September 20, 2006 7:31:57 PM

ok i will start with memory, you dont want to buy just one 1GB memory module because the chipset is capable of running dual channel memory configuration, and if you only buy one stick it will effectively cut your memory bandwidth in half, dual channel memory mode requires that you install two identical sticks of memory and with editing i would recomend 2GB of memory so 2x1GB sticks. goto http://www.crucial.com for reference.

With the CPU you advised her correctly, go with the intel, I would buy the fastest one she can afford.

with respect to the motherboard i would recomend an Asus they have a track record of stability, and relatively trouble free operation. Also get a board with the 975 chipset.

As far at the graphics card goes it depends on what program she is using, she may benifit from a profesional series of card rather then a gaming card, because they are both specialized to do different things, however profesional series cards can be very expensive, depending on their capability, more so then the cards aimed at the gaming market.

I would recomend a fully featured gaming card if you decide to go with that option, as it will have all the latest technology built into it, so we are talking higher numbers in the line, and more expense, graphics cards are expensive, often just as expensive as the cost of your intire core combined, for a fast fully featured card with the latest technology you are looking at spending a minimum of $200, up to $1000 depending on your needs.

you will also need some very fast SATA2 hard drives with native command queuing running in raid-0, i would recomend 2x western digital raptors.
Then you will also need a large storage drive, probably about 500GB minimum, i would recomend seagate for this, they are quiet, they run cool, and reliable with a 5 year warantee.

Find out what software she is going to be using, then go to the software developers website and find out what the minimum AND Recomended system specifications are for that specific Software, that will help you out ALOT on this decision.
September 20, 2006 7:47:54 PM

really thank you all pepole!
September 20, 2006 8:26:06 PM

Quote:
i'm advising someone about what computer to buy, in the worst case i'll build it, she wanted to buy :
AMD DualCore 4200+ AM2
MSI K9N nForce 550
1GB DDR2
GEFORCE 7300GS 256MB
but i first told her not to buy the DualCore 4200+, and to get the Intel Core 2 Duo e6400, its only 60$ diffrent and it worth it, i dont really know about the mother board but i guess its ok,


sorry if im wrong but it sounds like you think the motherboard chosen there which supports AMD will also support the INTEL cpu. it won't.
September 20, 2006 10:03:35 PM

no you right it will need to be changed also.
thanks
September 20, 2006 10:46:15 PM

Quote:
How is it that a video card can aid in video encoding? Encoding has nothing to do with the video card. IT's all in the CPU, RAM, and HDD.

ATi's Avivo uses hardware acceleration for video encoding/decoding.

http://www.ati.com/technology/avivo/features.html

Quote:
ATI Avivo's high definition video playback enters the realm of high-end home theater systems. Free your CPU to power other applications with ATI Avivo's hardware accelerated processing of new HD video formats, including H.264, for stutter-free playback.


Avivo is available for the X1000 series of video cards. nVidia and Intel have competing video technologies.
September 20, 2006 11:10:50 PM

Quote:
How is it that a video card can aid in video encoding? Encoding has nothing to do with the video card. IT's all in the CPU, RAM, and HDD.


Not so with the radeon X1x00 series. The AVIVO drivers specifically allow the graphics card processor to encode video... much faster than on a CPU.
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