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First Build Problem - Won't Start

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September 25, 2006 11:19:08 PM

Hi all,

This is my first time building my own PC and I have run into a very big problem, the PC won't start. To be more specific: the MoBo light which indicates if there is power running to it is lit up, but when I press the power button all the fans (including the processor and video card fans) start briefly (between .5-1 second) and then turn off. After this happens, the only way to repeat the process is to disconnect and recconect the power. I've done this about 5 times, a few of them being with only one of the Corsair sticks in to see if it was bad RAM (I didn't know if this would effect the problem but thought I would try). I have since stopped trying to turn it on after talking to a local computer guy who says I could fry the chip if I do it anymore (he also stated he'd charge $50 to diagnose the problem and it would take a couple of days).

Details of the computer are:
- Asus P5W DH Deluxe Motherboard
- Corsair XMS2 1 GB Package (DDR2-800)
- Intel Core 2 Duo E6400
- 2 X Western Digital Cavier SE 160 GB HDDs
- Lite-On 16xDVD+-R w/Lightscribe ATAPI/E-IDE
- Sapphire Radeon X1900GT
- Antec Smartpower 2.0 500W

Other important notes:
- Using stock cooler with stock crap grease
- WD HDs are setup in RAID 0 using the EZ-Raid feature on the P5W
- The case I have (Thermaltake Tsunami Dream Series) does not have a speaker
- The only other computer in the household I have is a Dell Dimension 8000 so I doubt there's any way to swap the parts in between

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I ordered all the parts through NewEgg so, if I need to, hopefully the RMA process won't be to bad...

More about : build problem start

September 25, 2006 11:31:13 PM

I ran into a similar problem and it was heat. One time I didn't have the heatsink installed corectly, it wasn't fully seated. The other time it was with an Antec Sonata II case, which has an exhaust pipe and it was not positioned properly. Ended up just not using it. I'd start by removing the heatsink, cleaning it and the CPU and then put on thermal paste and reinstall. If you have clean a heatsink and PSU just use rubbing alcohol.
September 25, 2006 11:37:28 PM

Quote:
I ran into a similar problem and it was heat. One time I didn't have the heatsink installed corectly, it wasn't fully seated. The other time it was with an Antec Sonata II case, which has an exhaust pipe and it was not positioned properly. Ended up just not using it. I'd start by removing the heatsink, cleaning it and the CPU and then put on thermal paste and reinstall. If you have clean a heatsink and PSU just use rubbing alcohol.


I also thought about this and removed the stock Intel fan and noticed that the thermal "paste" wasn't fully spread out over the heatsink. I have some Artic Silver 5 that I can apply, but your last sentence confused me a little bit. If I read it right, I should remove the Intel thermal grease with rubbing alcohol and a cloth? And, since the Intel heatsink is circular, should I apply the thermal greese onto it instead of the processor? I was looking at upgrading to a Zalman cooler at a later time (around when DX10 comes out) so I could venture into OCing, but is this an upgrade I should do now instead of later?

Edit: I'm also kind of fearful of trying to start it up many more times because of my new found fear of frying the chip, is this a realistic fear or just being a paranoid noob? :?
Related resources
September 25, 2006 11:52:51 PM

You need to clean both the bottom of the heatsink and top of the CPU. I use a paper towel and rubbing alcohol and never had a problem. If you use a cloth, make sure it doesn't leave any cloth droppings on either. Once everything is clean, put in the CPU, lock it down, and just put a dab of Arctic Silver in the center of the CPU and then install the heatsink. The paste probably wasn't fully spread because the machine hasn't run long enought for it to be fully spread. From everything I've read and my own experience, the stock heatsink should work, at least if you're not overclocking. I'd probably use the stock heatsink until I solved the problem and then upgrade the heatsink. One time I did have a bad mobo with similar symptoms but eliminate heat first.
September 26, 2006 12:10:17 AM

Don't worry, you won't fry anything, if its dead, it was dead on arrival.

This could a PSU or a mobo problem. Is there anyway to pull out the PC speaker from your old dell and put it onto your mobo? Hopefully you will get some diagnostic beeps that could help you debug.
September 26, 2006 1:01:18 AM

Unfortunately, the Dell Dimension 8200* (messed up earlier) is the family computer and after opening it up, and vacuuming up all the dust, I can not figure out which cables are the case speakers. The only one that I thought could be it is what I'm pretty sure is the headphone out jack in the front of the computer (plus this connection looks like it has its own custom interface to the motherboard, which I'm guessing is unique to Dell). Do you know if I can go buy a cheap speaker from Radio Shack or Best Buy and just have it plugged in through the side of my case?

I'm about to try the tip g-paw recommended above, and will repost with those results.
September 26, 2006 2:04:57 AM

Cleaned the processor and heatsink, applied artic silver 5, and came up with the same results (power for .5-1 second to fans, and then dead).

Any other suggestions? Based upon what is currently happening, what is possible as being a bad part or not installed correctly?
September 26, 2006 2:37:48 AM

Hey, sounds to me like its shorting out. thats prob why that guy told you not to do it anymore.

check to see if any parts are grounding against any metal parts. eg motherboard not seated right. i would highly doubt temp being a problem unless you have not clicked in the tabs correctly. it doesnt take a brain surgeon to install one :p . anyway i hope this helps.
September 26, 2006 3:52:27 AM

I've built my fair share of systems, and the few times I ever had something like what you describe happening was if there was a weak or loose connection, and back in the days of E-ide drives, sometimes an incorrect jumper configuration or improper ide channel termination would yield the same results. You mentioned that your DVD was IDE, so double check the jumper and verify that channel termination.

Also, I would have to agree that it is unlikely to be a heat issue seeing as how quickkly it is shutting down.
September 26, 2006 5:04:21 AM

Try one hard drive in the red sata connector.
September 26, 2006 6:36:06 AM

Quote:
I've built my fair share of systems, and the few times I ever had something like what you describe happening was if there was a weak or loose connection, and back in the days of E-ide drives, sometimes an incorrect jumper configuration or improper ide channel termination would yield the same results. You mentioned that your DVD was IDE, so double check the jumper and verify that channel termination.

Also, I would have to agree that it is unlikely to be a heat issue seeing as how quickkly it is shutting down.

I made sure that the jumper was set correctly, but I don't know what you mean by improper channel termination (like I said before, I'm new to system building). Could you explain what that means?

Quote:
Try one hard drive in the red sata connector.

I switched both off the EZ_Raid, put one in the red connector (SATA 1) and put the other in the black (SATA 3) which are both controlled by the "Intel Matrix Storage Technology" configuration (quoted from manual). After further reading in Asus' forums, I've found that the EZ_Raid option not only has been causing problems, but isn't the best performance wise.

Quote:
Hey, sounds to me like its shorting out. thats prob why that guy told you not to do it anymore.

check to see if any parts are grounding against any metal parts. eg motherboard not seated right. i would highly doubt temp being a problem unless you have not clicked in the tabs correctly. it doesnt take a brain surgeon to install one :p . anyway i hope this helps.

I hope not :(  All the risers and screws are in the right places, and the case has a center "stub" that fits perfectly in the hole on the motherboard where it is supposed too. On Asus' support website it says to take the motherboard and all components out of the case, setting it on a book or something like that and then testing it that way. Is that something I should do? Almost sounds like overkill, but if it's the only way to test and see what is wrong I'll sure as hell do it.

Thank you all for the help so far, I know in many forums where if I said this was my first time at anything my thread would definately not be on the first page. Anything else you guys can think of? Would the $50 to have the computer tech guy check it out be a good investment? (Although it kinda takes away from the feeling of building my own computer...)
September 26, 2006 7:44:20 AM

Hmm doesnt sound very encouraging. by all means if you want to rip it out and whack it on a table and hook everything that you usually would up. if it does the same thing then i would start to suspect the motherboard. if at all possible as well, rip the psu out of the dell and use that to see if anything different happens.
i know this rarely happens but it could be the cause, try another main power cable (as in the one that you connect to the wall). hopefully this will show you something.

fingers crossed :) 
September 26, 2006 9:07:12 AM

Not encouraging is an understatement, I never expected this to happen on my first build :x

I opened up the Dell to see about the power supply, upon inspecting the label I have found they put a measly 200W supply in there, and I have no idea how they got away with that. Also, after opening another very old Dell in the garage, and upon closer examination of the family computer mentioned above, I found the speaker in both to be conveniantly located on the motherboard. Why they have decided to do away with this feature on today's motherboards I can't understand...

I also tried switching the power supply cable, as well as the outlet that I am using with no success. The Antec power supply also uses modular cabling with 4 internal connectors of which I am using 3. I switched these around aw well with no success.

At this point, can the fault be connected to the motherboard? Or can the processor or any other component also cause this start but immediate stop problem? And, does anyone know if I can go to a local place and buy a PC speaker to hook up to the motherboard just for diagnosis? If it helps, the monitor LED does not switch from orange to green in that small ammount of time. And, during the short burst, I can't hear anything coming from the HDDs, although thats probably too short of time for them to spin audibly...

I'm out of ideas and hoping someone else isn't before I succumb to taking it to the local computer place. I'm not looking forward to paying $50 and waiting a few days for something I might be able to do myself so if you have any ideas please share...
September 26, 2006 9:57:21 AM

ok, another thought could be that the power supply is switching on then immediately shorting then hitting the safety switch, so if you can get another psu off anyone, even that dell 200w will show you if the current psu is the problem.

hmmm, other then that its either a dead processor which still doesnt explain the instant off, or the motherboard. its weird because from my building experience a dead mb wouldnt even turn on or partially dead one would turn on and do nothing, if it was the processor it would just turn on and do absolutely nothing.

i suggest disconnecting everything from the board when you go to test it with another psu, including things like video card, just have the cpu and motherboard and ram, if the thing stays on then you might have found a hidden pocket of luck

Really hope some of this is/was helpful
September 26, 2006 10:16:12 AM

Check that the 12V cable (dedicated to the cpu) that connects to the motherboard is properly connected.

If this cable is unplugged the computer won't start. It will run for a few seconds and then shut down.

A friend of mine forgot to plug in that cable and he got the same result as you...
September 26, 2006 10:22:11 AM

12V cable is installed correctly...

Mainyard and others thank you for all your help so far, I'm going to try and take everything out of the case tomorow and then attempt at taking out that dell psu, but for now I'm calling it a night (3:20 AM here) and will check back here tomorow for any other tips as well as my results. Again, thanks everyone so far!
September 26, 2006 11:27:59 AM

Alright, couldn't sleep (this thing is killing me). I went to Antec's website since it seems the majority here think it could be the power supply. After googling some things off there I came across this article:
http://www.ultimatepcrepair.com/news/18.html

It basically deals with diagnosing a powers supply by visual tests and by using a multimeter. After watching closely I made sure the fan that is supposed to come on during normal operation as stated by the Antec website did (forgot to look at this one before) and then proceded to bust out my multimeter. It's an old one and does not have a digital display so I'm not sure if the readings are correct since I only had the .5 - 1 second time to get a reading (not sure if the analog stick could move that fast). After testing the black-yellow wire on a molex connection out from one of my modular ports, it gave the correct reading of +12 volts even with the small ammount of time. However, when I tested the black-red connection on the same molex connection it only made it around +25 (the numbers go backwards).

Now, after this reading, and assuming I was using this thing right, and assuming that the reading was accurate, I'm guessing I should RMA the power supply and that is the source of my problems? Although, in all of your opinions, do you think that reading was accurate with the small ammount of time available? Should I also check the ATX connectors as it states in the article?

Edit: And if the PSU isn't working properly, should I be concerned about any of my other components being fried/dammaged? If that's the case, does anyone know if Antec's warranty or NewEgg's will cover those dammages?

Important Edit2: In the article is states to have the multimeter on the step above 12V for both tests. My multimeter has the following "levels": 1000. 250. 50. 10. and 2.5. I achieved the above results by using the 50 level for both tests. When I switched the level to 10 for the black-red connection it went all the way to +4.5 volts which is still off from the targed +5 volts, but I would assume is acceptable. If this is the correct way to test the connection, then this is the correct data as opposed to the +5V test above...
September 26, 2006 5:38:51 PM

Quote:
Alright, couldn't sleep (this thing is killing me). I went to Antec's website since it seems the majority here think it could be the power supply. After googling some things off there I came across this article:
http://www.ultimatepcrepair.com/news/18.html

It basically deals with diagnosing a powers supply by visual tests and by using a multimeter. After watching closely I made sure the fan that is supposed to come on during normal operation as stated by the Antec website did (forgot to look at this one before) and then proceded to bust out my multimeter. It's an old one and does not have a digital display so I'm not sure if the readings are correct since I only had the .5 - 1 second time to get a reading (not sure if the analog stick could move that fast). After testing the black-yellow wire on a molex connection out from one of my modular ports, it gave the correct reading of +12 volts even with the small ammount of time. However, when I tested the black-red connection on the same molex connection it only made it around +25 (the numbers go backwards).

Now, after this reading, and assuming I was using this thing right, and assuming that the reading was accurate, I'm guessing I should RMA the power supply and that is the source of my problems? Although, in all of your opinions, do you think that reading was accurate with the small ammount of time available? Should I also check the ATX connectors as it states in the article?

Edit: And if the PSU isn't working properly, should I be concerned about any of my other components being fried/dammaged? If that's the case, does anyone know if Antec's warranty or NewEgg's will cover those dammages?

Important Edit2: In the article is states to have the multimeter on the step above 12V for both tests. My multimeter has the following "levels": 1000. 250. 50. 10. and 2.5. I achieved the above results by using the 50 level for both tests. When I switched the level to 10 for the black-red connection it went all the way to +4.5 volts which is still off from the targed +5 volts, but I would assume is acceptable. If this is the correct way to test the connection, then this is the correct data as opposed to the +5V test above...


Someone else will have to clarify the test results. 2 things I've done in the past. One, I went to Circuitcity because they allow you to return a PSU within a certain number of days with no restocking fee and got a PSU and tried it. When that wasn't the problem I took it back. If there is a store you can do this, it would be worth a try before sending back the PSU. Second, when I ran into this I sent back the mobo, which was under warranty and that fixed the problem. I'm not suggesting everyone else is wrong, it's just once I get to the point I want to fine tune something that's not working with a ballpine hammer, if it's underwarranty, I send it back. I know it's a pain to send things back plus the expense of shipping and insurance but it's probably better than killing a piece of equipment or abusing a small animal.
September 26, 2006 8:00:25 PM

Most of the time when a PSU gives a brief start then turns off it's because it is "bad", shorted, overloaded (not strong enough for the devices connected to it) or it hasn't received the "power good" signal from the motherboard. The power good signal has to appear withing a specified time period or the PSU turns itself off, it's a safety feature of PSU's.

There are several places/forums here on Tom's that can explain how to check your PSU without having to take it in to a shop.

It would probably be a good idea to "rebuild" it outside of the case where it's easy to see if all connectors are seated properly, then you can eliminate the case as a possible problem. You should be able to have just the processor and the PSU connected to the MOBO and have the PSU stay on if both are alright.
September 26, 2006 8:36:39 PM

I'm currently having the same problem. Mine will come on for 10-60 seconds and then just shut off. The Antec TP2.0 I am using is only a week old and has ran in my older computer for the last week with zero problems. I find it hard to believe it suddenly crapped out the exact instant I put the new mobo/processor/RAM in.

In the short time it does come up, it seems to identify all components correctly including RAM, drives, etc. I have even been able to get into the BIOS a couple of times but that's usually where it craps out on me.

Unlike the OP, once mine shuts off, I can't just unplug and try again. I have to wait a couple minutes before it will turn back on at all.

What is a critically bad temperature for a P805D processor if I were to watch its temp in the BIOS while I wait for it to turn off. Maybe heat's my problem.
September 26, 2006 11:06:34 PM

Hey Boom42,

Your problem may be with your CPU. Your specs show a Core 2 cpu. The P5W DH Deluxe came out before the CPU did. The only way this motherboard can support the Core 2 cpu is to have a BIOS Rev. of 0604 or higher. You can find the Rev. # on the motherboard( it will be printed with model # on the board). If this BIOS Rev. is not 0604 or higher you will need to update the BIOS before the motherboard will see the new CPU.

If the BIOS Rev. is the problem. The only way to update it would be to put a non core 2 cpu on the motherboard and then flash the BIOS. The latest BIOS can be found on the ASUS website.

I hope this helps you.
September 27, 2006 12:44:13 AM

BIOS revision printed on the MB says its 0628, so it just meets the criteria.

I'm about to start taking everything out and setting it up outside the case one piece at a time and trying to power up, and if that doesn't work I'm going to head over to Best Buy to see how their return policy is.

I'll update with my results soon.
September 27, 2006 1:08:58 AM

I believe 0801 was the lowest BIOS revision for the DH Deluxe that really and truely worked with a Core 2 Duo. http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/cpu_support_right_ma... says 1101 now, though.

If you call ASUS support, you can get a free update (pre-flashed chip). CAn't track down th enumber right now, though.

Also, my PSU would lock up when a bad slot fan was plugged into it. If the BIOS doesn't help, look into that kind of stuff...
September 27, 2006 1:38:17 AM

Alright, I tried it out of the case with just the Motherboard, processor, processor fan+heatsink, and PSU like Blunc suggested above, and the same thing happened; on for .5 to 1 second and then off (started it by touching the metal part of a pen to the Power switch jumpers). So, I'm about to go to Best Buy and see if I can get a PSU off them and still be able to return it if opened.

As for the BIOS revision numbers needed, I'm not sure what I should do. Both of those websites are off of Asus's website so they're both official, but with different revisions listed. Would the BIOS revision cause it to start then stop though? Although my knowledge on this subject is severly limted, it seems it would still be able to keep running, just not be able to do anything (although that could be way off). I started a topic on Asus's official support forums here to see if I can get a response from people over there as to the BIOS needed...
September 27, 2006 2:00:11 AM

ok, youve probably already headed to the shop to get another psu but i forgot to mention another thing.
try starting it with just the motherboard plugged into the power, no cpu no fans, nothing. if its not the motherboard or psu then it will start and stay on.(youll need an led connected to the power pins on the m/b to make sure it actually powers the mb)
September 27, 2006 2:07:07 AM

Check to make sure the voltage switch on the power supply is set to 115v, if so more than likley you have a bad stick or sticks of ram. Also check the heatsink fan and be sure its plugged into the cpu terminal.
September 27, 2006 2:17:30 AM

Quote:
Hi all,

This is my first time building my own PC and I have run into a very big problem, the PC won't start. To be more specific: the MoBo light which indicates if there is power running to it is lit up, but when I press the power button all the fans (including the processor and video card fans) start briefly (between .5-1 second) and then turn off. After this happens, the only way to repeat the process is to disconnect and recconect the power. I've done this about 5 times, a few of them being with only one of the Corsair sticks in to see if it was bad RAM (I didn't know if this would effect the problem but thought I would try). I have since stopped trying to turn it on after talking to a local computer guy who says I could fry the chip if I do it anymore (he also stated he'd charge $50 to diagnose the problem and it would take a couple of days).

Details of the computer are:
- Asus P5W DH Deluxe Motherboard
- Corsair XMS2 1 GB Package (DDR2-800)
- Intel Core 2 Duo E6400
- 2 X Western Digital Cavier SE 160 GB HDDs
- Lite-On 16xDVD+-R w/Lightscribe ATAPI/E-IDE
- Sapphire Radeon X1900GT
- Antec Smartpower 2.0 500W



Ok, there's nothing to worry about. I have the same motherboard, same PSU, same ATI video card, and the same problem. Let it cycle on then off again, as you say, with all the fans spinning away, then start it again and immediately press and hold the "Insert" button (right front of the keyboard) and the fans will spin down, the monitor come alive and you're on your way. At this point you can press "delete" and go into bios and do your settings. If you HAVE tried twice to start it, then turn off and on the power supply, let it cycle once, THEN press insert on the next start.This has been discussed in other threads and seems to only happen with this video card on this motherboard, and only when changes have been made. There is NO need to RMA, there is no hardware problem, there is nothing wrong that won't probably be fixed by a Bios upgrade from Asus.
September 27, 2006 2:41:59 AM

Just an idea to test your Antec PSU, why not hook it up to that old Dell you mentioned before? If the Dell was still funtional with the 200Watt PSU in it, and it does the same thing with the Antec, then you will have your culprit.

About the IDE cable, which no one else seems to agree might be a possibility but which I would run into all the time back in the days of EIDE HDDs is the channel termination. What that means is: IDE was rather picky about how various drives were connected. You'll notice that IDE cables have three connection points:o ne on each end, and one in the middle. Since your HDDs are SATA and not connected to the IDE ribbon, make sure you are conncecting the DVD to the end of the cable, not the middle. Now, admittedly I have not built a system yet with SATA drives, so I do not have first hand experience with how SATA interacts with IDE devices (my understanding is that they are seperate and do not effect one another).

If the power supply checks out, Try disconnecting the DVD altogether and see if the problem persists. If so, then my next move would be to double check the CPU and RAM. Specifically, verify that they are fully seated, free of dust or fingerprints that might hinder a pin or connector.

I know what you mean about not wanted to pay the $50 to have things tested, if only as a matter of good old fashioned DYI pride.
September 27, 2006 3:13:47 AM

Quote:
Just an idea to test your Antec PSU, .


Please everybody, try what I've suggested about the "insert" button when turning on. I have had the Antec power supply in another system without a problem, likewise the ATI card, and the motherboard has been with a different card and PSU. It is ONLY the combination that Boom42 described, P5W DH, Antec 500W, and ATI 1900XT, which is the same as I have, that causes this issue, Holding Insert, then booting normally, will resolve the issue once and for all, at least until changes are made to the system, then it has to be done again. Trust me, this IS the solution to this particular boot problem. None of this other stuff is necessary.
September 27, 2006 3:38:46 AM

The Bios update issue has been the most common problem as of late. You can check my posts for more about this issue.
September 27, 2006 3:39:37 AM

Success!!! I went to the local Best Buy and bought a Dynex 400W PSU and plugged it in outside of the case with just the processor and motherboard, and it stayed on! :D  So, now the problem should be isolated to the PSU...

@BustedSony: In your situation did the fans on the system stop as well as the system itself? In your original post (if I read it correctly) it sounds like your fans continued to run, or you didn't have to disconnect the power from the PSU in order for it to start again. I will try this if your situation is the same, I just don't want to put everything in again and have to take it all out again :?
EDIT: And it wouldn't make sense that the Antec PSU doesn't start up with just the MB right? You said it was an issue with a combination of things, not just the PSU and MB...
September 27, 2006 4:04:38 AM

Quote:
Success!!! I went to the local Best Buy and bought a Dynex 400W PSU and plugged it in outside of the case with just the processor and motherboard, and it stayed on! :D  So, now the problem should be isolated to the PSU...


excellent :D :D  just remember that sometime any power supply may come off the line damaged or just not working, dont put the blame on antec and resolve to never buy them again. they are quality products and the only stuff i use in my business.
sounds like this one is finished. hopefully :D  go and game with that beast (compared to mine :p ) now.
September 27, 2006 5:20:58 AM

Quote:
excellent :D :D  just remember that sometime any power supply may come off the line damaged or just not working, dont put the blame on antec and resolve to never buy them again. they are quality products and the only stuff i use in my business.
sounds like this one is finished. hopefully :D  go and game with that beast (compared to mine :p ) now.

Na, I know Antec is a quality supplier so I will definately keep on buying from them in the future. I found it quite interesting though when comparing the two PSUs that the Antec one is completely missing the white cord that goes to the ATX connector which the Dynex one has. Instead, it just leaves that pin blank :? So, that may have been the source of my problem...

I'm putting in the RMA request now, and thank you everyone for your help :D 
September 27, 2006 6:18:26 AM

Quote:
Success!!! I went to the local Best Buy and bought a Dynex 400W PSU and plugged it in outside of the case with just the processor and motherboard, and it stayed on! :D  So, now the problem should be isolated to the PSU...

@BustedSony: In your situation did the fans on the system stop as well as the system itself? In your original post (if I read it correctly) it sounds like your fans continued to run, or you didn't have to disconnect the power from the PSU in order for it to start again. I will try this if your situation is the same, I just don't want to put everything in again and have to take it all out again :?
EDIT: And it wouldn't make sense that the Antec PSU doesn't start up with just the MB right? You said it was an issue with a combination of things, not just the PSU and MB...


Upon pressing the power switch on the front of the P-180 the fans would come on full tilt, along with the power light, with the blower for the 1900XT sounding like a jet engine, it would do this for say 15 seconds then everything would shut down. No pressing of keyboard buttons would have any effect. Then I push the power button again, it again comes on like a jet engine but if I'm holding down "Insert" the fans will drop to normal speed and the system POSTs. It works from that point on through repeated reboots UNLESS something is changed on the motherboard, a card pulled, HD changed etc. Then it's the whole routine over again.

I will say that if the bug is "cocked" ready to happen then just plugging in or turning on the power supply will start the system into jet engine mode, followed by the shutdown. Then with the "insert" cure it won't happen again, even if the power supply is disconnected or tuned off, UNTIL a connection to the MB is changed, as noted...

I haven't tried a different power supply, I do have a Thermaltake I can use. A problem with the BIOS has been suggested. Let's remember that the P5W DH can be turned on by remote, even UNPLUGGING a device from the lower USB ports will start the system. I suspect the bug is related to this.
!