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Router Problems?

Last response: in Networking
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January 4, 2006 1:30:51 AM

Hey there everybody! I need some help.
Here's the problem. I have a Linksys Wireless WRT54G v2 router, which, I think, is acting up. First of all, I can't get port forwarding to work! About three month ago my port forwarding was working flawlessly, I could use download clients like DC++, or BitComet, or have an ftp server running, etc... Now, whichever ports I use, nothing seems to work. Plus, in clients like DC++ where you're connected to several hubs, the connection to the hubs is constantly dropped. On top of that, the joke's on me actually, because people can download from me, but I can't download from them! :evil:  Now, that's not the end of the story, when many computers are connected at my house to the router, the internet connection is extremely slow, well I shouldn't say the internet connection, because when I connect just one computer directly to the modem everything is fine. So, I will say that the router connection is slow. Pages load for ages, even when I try to connect to the router to administer it, it takes forever! My friend told me that it might be due to the fact that I use 128bit secure connection, so I turned that off all together, didn't help! Then I went to the extreme of upgrading the firmware version, which didn't do much either... Anyways, to make long story short, what am I to do? I am thinking of just buying another router, was thinking of D-Link DI-784 AirPremier? Any suggestions? Anybody else experienced any problems like these?
Thank you in advance!!!

More about : router problems

January 5, 2006 3:11:48 PM

You could have excessive chatter on your network..

If you're running torrents or anything like that, it can put an extreme load on your router which would slow it down. High fragmentation via MTU might also be a culprit.

Set your computers MTUs down in the 1470s, don't run bandwidth intensive programs and test it out.

The more computers on the network, the slower it will be if they're all accessing the internet or wireless router at the same time.

I wouldn't jump to another router just yet because that most likely isn't the problem.

Have you tried running off a wire instead of wireless to see what kind of improvements you see?

You might not be getting a connection because too many people are downloading, your connection could be too bogged down from other comptuers or your port forwarding might be messing with you. Disable port forwarding, disable uploading in your programs, then test it out.
January 7, 2006 10:06:18 PM

Well, actually no, on my network there's only 5 computers, so the load isn't that big, because I actually talked to a friend of mine, where he has 9 copmuters on a similar wireless router, but he has DSL instead. And yes, I've even tried changing MTU, which did not help either. I started experiencing slow downs about 2 month ago, to which one of my coworkers told me that the slowness of my internet/router might be due to the fact that usually ISPs have promotions around christmas time etc... so they might've signed up a lot of people in my area, and that is why my cable internet might be slow. So now, instead of buying a new router, I just thought i try switching from cable to DSL. Do you think it is worth it?
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January 8, 2006 1:15:05 PM

I'll chime in on the worth it part. I used a cable modem for many years. After a recent move, I decided to try DSL because COX was more expensive for my "all around" setup. I've been using DSL now for about 6 months and have not had a single problem with it. The speeds are comperable to cable modem speeds and I don't have to worry about peak time for users on my node, as was the case with cable.
January 8, 2006 2:06:38 PM

Yes I understand the peak hours when everybody starts using cable. The only reason I use cable is because it has a static IP! I've talked to my DSL ISP and they say that their IPs are refreshed ever 4 to 24 hours. SO basically if I connect my modem to the router and router keeps the connection live, the max that I would have a static IP for is 24 hours. And of course, in order for me to have a static IP I would have to dish out extra green.
January 8, 2006 4:23:10 PM

I'm not sure how often my dynamic IP retains a lisence; I'll have to check. That's odd that you have a static IP with cable. Having Cox, I had a dynamic IP; they used to have static way back when @Home was in business.

I would think that a 4 or 24 hour license is a bit crazy for an ISP. That seems to be too much added traffic unless it's a very small ISP. Also, the only concern with a dynamic IP's license is if the device with the IP is powered off after the renewal time on the license; at which point, it would request a new IP when it is brought back online. Otherwise, you would keep the same IP. So, if you have a router that has an UPS, you could keep the same IP for a long time.
January 8, 2006 5:16:38 PM

well the ISP that I am switching to is Bell Canada, which is a huge company actually. Yeah that's what i thought at first, that my router will keep the connection alive and the ip will be essentially static, but no. And yes, I do have a router that keeps the connection alive, and I told that to the Bell Canada rep, he said that the max amount of time that I could have the IP for is 24 hours, after which it will be automatically refreshed!
January 8, 2006 5:20:04 PM

You are probably talking about the lease time for an IP. With Earthlink (using the Timewarner network), the DHCP lease time for me in every 24 hours. My IP hasn't changed in a few months. Most of the times you'll still get the same IP address when your lease expires. About the only time my IP changes is like I mentioned, every few months, or if I happened to change out my network card in my router (changing the MAC address of the NIC connected to the cable modem). There are routers out there that you can buy that will automatically update your IP address with a Dynamic DNS service (most common that I see is dyndns). I know a v2 WRT54G Linksys (like you have) will do this with the latest firmware. I also know that m0n0wall, IPCop and I think Coyote and BrazilFW will also do this. That way you could host some type of service (game server, FTP, web server, etc) using an address such as whatever.dyndns.com and whatever your IP is still get to your server(s).

What you're saying it common across most ISP's using DHCP to lease IP's and paying extra for a static.

I know I'm not really helping with your problem though. Sorry
January 8, 2006 11:26:43 PM

Here's what I recently discovered. Even though the internet is supposedly 'slow', when I run a test for speed, it shows it very close to what it is 5000/800, which is my connection speed. SO what I don't understand is why the internet is slow, any server I connect to is slow. Even webpages I have to click the link 2-3 times before the pages loads! Now, that is not the biggest problem, as I said in my first post, port forwarding doesn't work!!! :twisted: It almost makes me cry! I would stay with my current ISP if port forwarding worked properly, but it doesn't!
January 9, 2006 10:55:09 PM

Try doing a tracert to a couple websites and see how many hops it takes. The ISP could have recently changed its routing system. The ISP could have also changed its DNS servers. Slow DNS translation from overloaded servers could account for slow surfing. See what DNS servers your friend with DSL is using and try those.

My neighbor has cox cable internet and I have sbc dsl. When he does a tracert to my works webserver it takes 18 hops, the signal goes all the way to san diego and nevada before it comes back to the local web server. My tracert takes 4 hops and never leaves the area. His ping response time is 200ms while mine is 15ms. However, he gets 380kb/s downloads on his 3mb connection while I get 240kb/s downloads on my 3mb connection.
Arn't networks crazy ;) 
January 20, 2006 12:23:55 PM

Quote:
Here's what I recently discovered. Even though the internet is supposedly 'slow', when I run a test for speed, it shows it very close to what it is 5000/800, which is my connection speed. SO what I don't understand is why the internet is slow, any server I connect to is slow. Even webpages I have to click the link 2-3 times before the pages loads! Now, that is not the biggest problem, as I said in my first post, port forwarding doesn't work!!! :twisted: It almost makes me cry! I would stay with my current ISP if port forwarding worked properly, but it doesn't!



I am having the exact same problem with my WRV54G Linksys. It started slowing down a couple of week ago. I can connect directly to my Bellsouth DSL modem and it workd fine. But with the router back inline...internet speeds drop to a crawl. I would be real interested in how this is resolved.

The only change I made in my router was to add a URL to the block list. Before this list was empty. Could this addition somehow be slowing down the router?
January 20, 2006 2:06:27 PM

To do the filtering there will be some caching involved on the router (like a proxy). Caching pages on a home router can slow it to a crawl due to the low system specs in those routers. To cache/filter/proxy pages with any sort of speed you need a router with decent specs. My router is a 1ghz via eden w/ 1gb of ram and a 40gb hd and it still slows down a bit when I use the proxy. My old router had 2 PIII 550mhz procs, 1gb of ram and a 10krpm scsi drive. That thing could proxy like crazy but the power bill wasnt worth it, lol.
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