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Core 2 Duo Aluminum Top -- Removeable?

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September 28, 2006 2:38:42 PM

Has anyone removed the aluminum cover of this processor? And if so did it A) cause damage, and B) is replaceable for warrenty purposes...

I really dont like the idea of having one more layer between me and my cooling medium... especially an aluminum one.

Mike
September 28, 2006 3:07:52 PM

Quote:
Has anyone removed the aluminum cover of this processor? And if so did it A) cause damage, and B) is replaceable for warrenty purposes...

I really dont like the idea of having one more layer between me and my cooling medium... especially an aluminum one.

Mike


So what did you have in mind? put thermal paste all over the chip itself then a heatsink directly on it? Yeah I'm sure that wont hurt your chip at all[/sarcacsm]
September 28, 2006 3:28:21 PM

Some very bright engineers designed the packageing for the C2D. My advice would be to assume they knew what they were doing. The heat spreader serves a very useful purpose.

And yes, removing it would void the warranty.
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September 28, 2006 3:35:21 PM

you sure its aluminum? ive seen one filed down a little bit and it was copper in color. Maybe aluminum or nickle plated copper?
September 28, 2006 3:38:45 PM

looks like aluminum... would be nice to take it off... I just dont want to be the first to do it... especially with a X6800...

Mike
September 28, 2006 3:38:52 PM

With a name like greenjelly, I'm sure you're more qualified to make the call than any Intel Engineers. Why should they know what they're doing, they only make the thing. If you don't like having more than 1 layer between you and your cooling medium, then you should feel obligated to fix that. I recommend using a precision tool, such as a chainsaw. No, that doesn't void the warranty. I don't like the idea of more than 1 layer between you and your meds...
September 28, 2006 3:47:34 PM

Quote:
Try it if you dare with LGA775 processors...

I only wish it was as simple as S939 where removing IHS is a walk in the park.


I guess the moral of the story is don't try this at home.

That was funny as hell that he removed the core from the PCB before the IHS could come loose from the core. :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
WOW!
What do they use on there... liquid weld or somthing?

So now i know that even if the core could handle 80+c without damage it would not stay attached to the PCB.

They probably use thermal epoxy... Which would be a good reason not to try and remove it... Epoxy drys as hard as steel... in fact, if you put it on roughed steel, and try and remove it... it will remove the steel before loosing its bond, or itself breaking... Epoxy is also non-conductive... and I wouldnt doubt that they make stome epoxys that would wipe the table with artic silver, as far as thermal properties goes...

Of course, you put Thermal Epoxy as a gap filler between your heatsink and the chip, and that will be the last heatsink anyone will ever be able to put on that chip...

The only way to remove it then, would be to somehow protect the bottom of the chip... then put it on a grinder, and grind down just enough... but if you go a milimeter to far... you have a nice paper holder...
September 28, 2006 3:54:09 PM

why dont you consider water cooling or something other than air if you need more cooling? i read that link that someone posted about removing the HS and they pulled off the core completely. i dont think you want to try that with a 1000 processor. but hey its yours, do what you want.
September 28, 2006 4:15:54 PM

I have read an article that they removed the top to a Celeron 350 or 351 and it dropped the temp a bit using a TEC cooling system.

I know they used a soldering iron and just used one of the tips shaped like a flathead screwdriver and warmed the core enough to slide the IHS off.

I will not, like wusy, post a link and will leave you to find it for yourself :)  I don't want you coming back here and crying for me to mail you $1000 because you have a new $1000 pocketsized skipping stone.
September 28, 2006 4:17:49 PM

Quote:
you sure its aluminum? ive seen one filed down a little bit and it was copper in color. Maybe aluminum or nickle plated copper?

Indeed, they are just plain tinned copper.
You can lap, polish and make it shine like a mirror!

Watercooling done... and BTW, beign improved... I should have the best watercooling system money can buy... the onlything next to do is to go Peltier!

Mike
September 30, 2006 6:30:38 AM

The integrated heat spreader is made from copper with a nickle plating.

1) Don't remove the heat spreader unless you want to void your warranty
2) There is a thermal glue like compound under the spreader on top of the actual silicon die.
3) you would most likely damage your processor trying to remove the heatspreader
4) I would bet you would get worse cooling if you did try to mate the heatsink directly too the silicon die.

Bad idea all the way around.

Go for it! :lol: 
October 4, 2006 4:51:03 PM

There has been success stories from very few ppl about removing the IHS on the C2Ds

Process went something similar to this:
cut around edge of IHS and remove the rubbery like sealing the IHS.
put razor blades in the corner of the IHS.
use a clamp and towel to hodl the chip
heat the top of the IHS with lighter/heatgun/torch but do not go above 90 celsius I believe, where that is the temperature of the 'solder' holding the IHS onto the core.
be patient, the IHS will pop off.
if you are lucky, you will have a naked C2D
October 4, 2006 4:52:43 PM

oh, and the most important thing is that you do not want to 'pry' the IHS off, or you will pry the core right off with the IHS
October 4, 2006 8:16:00 PM

Yep, that solves it... the fuckers coming off....

hahah, the answer is... unless your a crazed idiot... Do not remove the top of the cpu. I dont doubt that if you do remove it safely, and you work hard at protecting the base of the cpu, and the little connections that lead from the cpu to the pins... that you would get better cooling.

With that said, you would probably find the improvement to be less then 1c
October 4, 2006 8:51:26 PM

These C2D have been horrible at getting their IHS removed.

Most likely you will pull the core right off the chip or the core gets cracked. There have been people over at XS I believe that have suceeded with no physical damage but the processor does not work anymore.

With the C2D being so much more power efficient than any of it's predecessors, there is really no point in trying to take the IHS.
October 4, 2006 10:39:05 PM

This must be the most bone-headed plan I've seen on this forum, and there are some real knuckle headed ideas expressed here. This must be your Mummy and Daddy's money that you're considering pissing away; otherwise no sane person would even remotely consider doing what you're contemplating.
October 4, 2006 11:18:51 PM

8O Don't be silly... of course the ihs is removable, :roll: the devil is in the details as to functioning afterwards...
October 6, 2006 12:08:04 PM

Quote:

2) There is a thermal glue like compound under the spreader on top of the actual silicon die.


Really? :(  I thought that it was only a kind of thermal paste like the one used by AMD. It obiously makes a huge difference...
October 6, 2006 1:25:20 PM

I believe its actually some type of solder. As I mentioned, it melts around 90 degrees celcius.

Yea, AMD only has thermal paste which means all you gotta do is use a razor to cut out the sides and then you win.
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