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Should I go for SATA2?

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September 30, 2006 12:17:33 PM

I have changed the Mobo and now I have a GA-K8N pro-sli, but I have my 2 year old HDD from Seagate. It is a 80gb sata1 hdd.

Should I chnge to a Sata2 hdd? Would my pc run faster? :?:
And if so wath would be the best choice for a Sata2 hdd no bigger than 250gb

For more info here's my rig: :!:

MOBO: Ga-K8n pro-sli
CPU: Amd643800+skt 939
Ram: 2*512 mb Kingmax pc 3200 2,5-4-4-8-12 2T ( I think I have to change it with a faster and better one) :?:
Hdd: Seagate 80gb sata1
Cdrw:Asus
Dvdrw:Lg
Psu: 560W Chieftec

Thanks! :D  [/img]

More about : sata2

a b G Storage
September 30, 2006 6:26:42 PM

SATA2 has a faster interface speed, but this will not give you any extra performance. One benefit they do carry is NCQ though, which reduces the wear on the read/write heads. I suggest this drive if you want one no bigger than 250GB.
September 30, 2006 11:49:38 PM

This is really beating a dead horse, but there is no such thing as a SATA 2 hard drive!

There is a SATA I specification and a SATA 2 specification, but no hard drives conforming to the SATA I specification were ever produced or marketed, they all are manufactured accourding to the SATA II specification.

The SATA Standards board has adamantly requested that manufactures stop using the fictitious SATA 2 label.


When people make incorrectly call the drives SATA 1 and SATA 2 it makes peopel think that there is a set of SATA 1 features and a set of SATA 2 features. This is false.

All SATA hard drives follow are of the same generation and have follow the same specifications and implement the same set of features.

So some drives have a 1.5 Gbps transfer rate and NCQ, while others have 3.0 Gbps tranfer rate but no NCQ.

Some of those features are optional like 1.5 vs 3.0 Gbps transfer rates and NCQ.

1.5 vs 3.0 should simply be ignored as it has zero impact on performance. SATA ard drives have yet to exceed the 100 MBps speed limit.

It is however handy to have a controller that supports 3.0 Gbps, because there are devices like port multiplier and external RAID enclosures that allow more than one drive to connect to a single SATA port.

So all things equal you would be better off getting a motherboard with SATA 3.0 Gbps support, but when it comes to hard drives transfer rates are meaningless.
Related resources
a b G Storage
October 1, 2006 12:26:56 AM

Codesmith, copy the above post and make a new thread, paste it, then ask a mod to sticky it. Each time I or anyone else refers to drives as SATA2 devices, point us to that thread.
October 1, 2006 2:27:44 AM

I already did that months ago. :) 

Apparently too long ago, this forum has a short memory.
a b G Storage
October 1, 2006 3:37:06 AM

I should note that the only reason I use the term SATA2 is because retailers use it.
a b G Storage
October 1, 2006 6:08:47 AM

Ok..... i'll elaborate a bit more. The reason I said I use it because retailers use it, is so that people looking for help on here don't get confused. If i start refering to every SATA device as just SATA and not distinguishing between devices labelled SATA and SATA2 (even though I am fully aware there effectively is no difference), people may not know what I'm talking about.

I believe I have already mentioned this, but if I do note what Codesmith said earlier, I do so as a footnote in the post. As anal as I am about terminology, I want people to know what I'm refering to moreso than I want to be using the correct term. I use the term the other person knows best, then I tell them what the correct term is at the end so they know for next time.
October 1, 2006 2:27:33 PM

IEEE needs to spend some time in the Disk and Raid area to clear up miss information taken off vendors sites instead of worring about what my Treo is doing.
October 1, 2006 2:29:29 PM

The problem with using terms like SATA 1 and SATA 2 is that people start assuming you have two types of drives and that SATA 2 drives have features unavliable to SATA 1 drives.

This leads to people will end up making poor purchasing decisions due to deceptive marketing.
a b G Storage
October 1, 2006 3:11:09 PM

Quote:
The problem with using terms like SATA 1 and SATA 2 is that people start assuming you have two types of drives and that SATA 2 drives have features unavliable to SATA 1 drives.

This leads to people will end up making poor purchasing decisions due to deceptive marketing.


Which is why I set the record straight (like you did earlier) in threads like this one.
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