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How do I add more space to my HD Partition? Urgent

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September 30, 2006 5:22:15 PM

Hi, I have a hd with drive C which has less than 1 gig of space left in it, i wanted to add more free space from unalocated sectors, or from another partition, I used partition magic 8.0by Power Quest, and all goes well after the reboot, but when the actual "space" is added i get this error:
Error 2003
"File size does not match FAT allocation for file." and then i just get apress eny key to restart, I used partition magic in the past to extend my c drive form 6 bg to 12 gb and all worked fine, but now that i have build a new system (about 3 weeks ago) I am unable to add more space to the main C drive, and I am doing the same things I used to do (atleast I think I am)
I needed to install photoshop, and Dreamweaver (and deliver my project by the middle of next week), but I just do not have enough space on the C drive even if i want to install these apps to another directory(as i installed almost all other apps)

Does anyone know how can i add more space t my C drive partition?

Thank You, any help will be greately aprecieated.
September 30, 2006 5:55:45 PM

I'd say use partition magic, but since you already used that, I don't really know.

However, you could install your programs on another drive and get around you space problem like that, or uninstall some other programs...
September 30, 2006 6:26:27 PM

I install all the programs on my D partition, and i couldnt get the C drive any biger when i was installing windows, so i thought that i will be able to do it later on, is there maby something in the bios that might prevent me from changeing the partioning system(that is any options) I cant really uninstall anything, i just have the barebones that is the ms office, a compiler, media player, norotn system, and such installed on it nothing really more, and i have total of 2 hd's of 240GB space all partitions are 95% and up free except the C drive which has 1.6 gb free space left and thats without the windows system restore, otherwise more space is munched up, and i also disabled the virtual ram on thec drive (just swiched it to another drive) to save some space, maby im just doing something wrong, but i dont know what.
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a c 371 G Storage
September 30, 2006 6:42:47 PM

Try running chkdsk. If it reports errors, run it again with the /f option. That sometimes helps.
September 30, 2006 6:55:55 PM

just re-install your os,and when you get to the part where you select partition size,make it 20 gigs.then install the os into that partition.will save you all kinds of trouble in the long run.and do you admin your system???i mean do you delete all cookies and temp folders on a regular basis???i only ask because your main partition seems to be getting full quickly.another way is for you to install the software on another partition.this will save you space on c-drive yet it will still install the necessary files needed to run from c.goodluck.

Dahak

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September 30, 2006 6:57:29 PM

thc will try that and report back on it.
September 30, 2006 7:00:16 PM

i cant aford to reinstall the os, i just dont have enought ime to play with it, i install all files to the other partitions ( i always did so) only the os and the internt , antivirus/internet security are installed on the c drive, i used to have the same issue before (a year ago or so) and just used partion magic, aded then 4 gigs and i was fine with that) but now i dont know whats wrong.
September 30, 2006 7:04:35 PM

ok i run the check and it reported no problems, so now im clueless.
September 30, 2006 7:09:43 PM

It allmost sound like PM does not enough space to work. Remove all temp files, Windows and Internet, CD/DVD temp space.

Then run defrag. With very little free space it may take a very long time. Then see if you have enough space for PM to run.
September 30, 2006 7:24:52 PM

Quote:
I install all the programs on my D partition, and i couldnt get the C drive any biger when i was installing windows, so i thought that i will be able to do it later on, is there maby something in the bios that might prevent me from changeing the partioning system(that is any options) I cant really uninstall anything, i just have the barebones that is the ms office, a compiler, media player, norotn system, and such installed on it nothing really more, and i have total of 2 hd's of 240GB space all partitions are 95% and up free except the C drive which has 1.6 gb free space left and thats without the windows system restore, otherwise more space is munched up, and i also disabled the virtual ram on thec drive (just swiched it to another drive) to save some space, maby im just doing something wrong, but i dont know what.


As previously suggested, you may not have enough free space for
PM to do it's thing. I suggest you temporarily move Programs from C:\Program files\ to the other physical drive, defrag, then try resizing. By the way, did you "COMMIT" changes in Partition Magic? I've made this mistake myself.

EDIT: VERY IMPORTANT! Defrag the volume you are taking space from!!!


When you reply, please give us your individual Drive and Volume sizes and free space so we may have a better idea of what you're up against.
September 30, 2006 7:48:13 PM

Hi, here is a linq to the screanshot i made:

http://img90.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sya4.jpg

im taking the "free space" from the J drive which is totaly empty just created to add space to the C drive I also tried to extend it using the unasigned space, but that didnt help either.

btw what s the "commit" thing You mentioned? i mean there were options to undo, and apply (if im not mistaken) after i picked the space sizes, i cliked on that then the pc restarted and went to that light blue screan, moved the d and g drive by 7.8 mb, and then started to ad space to c drive but at about 15 and then 18 % it usualy displayed that error (mentioned above) and thats all i could do, i tried this all i think 4 times or so, I remember that before (about a year ago when i was doing this) i had about 900mb left and that was enough space, now i have 1.6 gigs free, so that whould work(i think). and before i did this without defragmentation and it worked, but ill try it and see if it helped, but i dont think that defragmenting a primary drive which just "takes" on more space change anything, that is the other drive if it would be fool, then that drive would definitively need a defrag, but ill check it, just in case, as suggested.
September 30, 2006 8:14:26 PM

I personally would never use PM or anything else that messes around with the size of my partitions. And, since you have already done it and gotten errors, I can not be sure all the data is completely intact.

But, what I would personally do is use ghost. Ghost the C drive, resize the partition with fdisk, and then pull the ghost image back. As long as the image of the system disk is good and there isn't anything funky with the data from using PM, then all should be OK and you won't have to reload the OS.
Anonymous
September 30, 2006 8:22:00 PM

Try converting your FAT32 c: partition to NTFS then try the resize again. Make sure you are resizing it to the same partition type (FAT32) if you dont want to change it to NTFS.
September 30, 2006 8:28:54 PM

so i cant add ntfs partitioned free space to a c partition which is a fat 32?
I mean i know they are different but i thought that the ntfs space will be converted before it will be aded to the fat32 partion
Anonymous
September 30, 2006 8:37:35 PM

There are three reasons why you would be unable to resize a partition that has unallocated space immediately to the right of it.

First, the unallocated space may reside within an extended partition. All you need to do is select the extended partition, choose the Resize/Move option in PartitionMagic, and move the left border of the extended partition to the right. This will move some unallocated space outside the extended partition.

Second, you may be attempting to resize the partition across a cluster boundary, and you do not have enough free space inside the partition to allow the clusters to be resized. Following is a chart that shows different cluster boundaries and the space needed inside a partition to resize it across those boundaries.
Cluster Boundary Space Needed to Resize Cluster Size
128 MB 8 MB 2 KB to 4 KB
256 MB 41 MB 4 KB to 8 KB
511 MB 205 MB 8 KB to 16 KB
1023 MB 564 MB 16 KB to 32 KB

Third, if the partition that you are trying to resize uses the FAT16 file system, the partition may already be at its maximum size. Partitions that use the FAT16 file system are limited to a size of 2 GB. If the partition is at this limit, you must convert it to FAT32 or NTFS before you can increase its size.


EDIT > If you are getting ERROR 2003, you need to run a full CHKDSK on your drive.
September 30, 2006 9:07:22 PM

FAT32 has partition size limits based on the cluster size employed.

It is likely that your cluster sizes are too small for the partition you are trying to create.

In anycase you should convert all your partittion to NTFS.

You also should be using just three partitions, a C: & D on your fastest drive and just one big NTFS partition for all remaining drives.

C: would be for all your software and nothing else. D: for the "special" account folders (my documtents, desktop, internet and email profiles...) and whatever else you want.

If you want to backup your saved games, program settings write a batch files to copy the files to another hard drive. Or use real backup software.
September 30, 2006 10:17:01 PM

From the MS KB:

NOTE: Although the FAT32 file system supports hard disks up to 2 terabytes in size, some hard disks may not be able to contain bootable partitions that are larger than 7.8 GB because of limitations in your computer's basic input/output system (BIOS) INT13 interface. Please contact your hardware manufacturer to determine if your computer's BIOS supports the updated INT13 extensions. For additional information about FAT32, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Don't know if this applies in your case, but I don't believe this limitation applied in NTFS. At least not mentioned in NTFS KB.
September 30, 2006 10:58:47 PM

Quote:
Hi, here is a linq to the screanshot i made:

http://img90.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sya4.jpg

im taking the "free space" from the J drive which is totaly empty just created to add space to the C drive I also tried to extend it using the unasigned space, but that didnt help either.

btw what s the "commit" thing You mentioned? i mean there were options to undo, and apply (if im not mistaken) after i picked the space sizes, i cliked on that then the pc restarted and went to that light blue screan, moved the d and g drive by 7.8 mb, and then started to ad space to c drive but at about 15 and then 18 % it usualy displayed that error (mentioned above) and thats all i could do, i tried this all i think 4 times or so, I remember that before (about a year ago when i was doing this) i had about 900mb left and that was enough space, now i have 1.6 gigs free, so that whould work(i think). and before i did this without defragmentation and it worked, but ill try it and see if it helped, but i dont think that defragmenting a primary drive which just "takes" on more space change anything, that is the other drive if it would be fool, then that drive would definitively need a defrag, but ill check it, just in case, as suggested.


You've got way more partitions than necessary. I'd start by clearing out everything but the C: volume from the primary drive, Kick it up to 40 Gigs or so then convert it to NTFS (It may not convert without some space). Then make a nice big D drive for storage if you'd like

Had a game plan for you but it won't work if you have programs installed to volumes H and I on the second drive.

Looks like D is just a page file. For now, move the page file to H or I then delete D. What's in J? if it's storage move the director(ies) over with the page file and delete J.

I looks pretty full so If H does not have installed programs on it I would change volume G to Z then change H to G then move your installed Games back to the new G and delete Z. Windows will not have a problem finding them when done. It's best to have games installed on a separate drive from Windows so cut-scenes, etc. load more smoothly. If you can't move it now, no big loss.

Sorry, out of time for now, but maybe you and the others can see where I'm going with this. Simplify and stick with NTFS formatting.

You have to maintain the drive letters/paths for installed programs unless you're willing to reinstall the effected programs. If you choose to reinstall a program be sure to uninstall before changing it's location then copy it's directory under \Program Files\ to the new install volume. It will contain your preferences, saves, etc. depending on what it is. Save yourself some headaches.

Damn, gotta go! Check back in a few hours, but what is in volumes H I and J? BTW, Partition Magic is fine, you did it right but had nowhere to operate. I'm surprised Windows can operate at this point.
October 1, 2006 2:40:36 AM

I am curious how you expect to increase the size one partition with no unallocated, free space contiguous with the partition you want to resize.

You can resize the C partition, but it will be a multi-step process and will take overnight to complete.

Step 1: reduce size of your games partitron by about 5 to 10 GB. Do you really need that much space for games?

Step 2: move the resized partition to the end of the drive, so there is no free space after the partition.

Step 3: reduce the size of your GB NTFS partition by about 10 GB.

Notes re step 3

If you are actually using this partition exclusively for page file (aka swap file) and you have set the page file to use the entire drive you are wasting resources and looking for trouble. The generally accepted rule is that your page/swap file size should not exceed 3 times the total amount of physical RAM in your system. Given that today's systems have an absolute upper limit of 4 GB of RAM, your page file should not be larger than 12 GB. You should reduce the size of your GB NTFS partition to a maximum of 15 GB.

Step 4: Move the resized GB NTFS partition to the end of available free space so that there is no free space after the partition.

Step 5: It looks like both the Games and GB NTFS partitions are logical drives in the EXTENDED partition on your primary master drive. You will need to resize the extended partition so that there is free unallocated space available after the primary partition on your first hard drive.

Step 6: resize the C partition to approximately 10 to 20 GB in size. If you end up with leftover free space on the primary partition, you shoud resize the extended partition and create some additional logical drives on it.

Notes re Step 6

Why is your root partition FAT32, when you are using WIndows XP, as your screen shot makes crystal clear. If you are not running a dual boot system with Win 9x/ME you have no need for FAT32, which is less efficient and flexible than NTFS. For starters, the current version of NTFS allows larger boot drive size.

Given that your screenshot does not indicate a multi-boot system, why is your H drive FAT32?

As noted elsewhere, and discussed in some detail in the PM manual, there are limitations to the size of a root partition when using FAT32. Also, FAT32 has troubles dealing with hard drives larger than 127 GB - all propaganda from MS notwithstanding. They even have some trouble-shooting info about this issue.

There is a detailed manual on the CD-ROM which you would be wise to peruse - otherwise known in computing circles as RTFM. You would also be wise to look up more info re hard drives.

On to the question of how many drives/partitions are appropriate and necessary.

You can approach the question from two perspectives. One says that the fewer partitons the better. The other says I want control and ease of backup, and most importantly, seperation of potential problems. I prefer the second approach, despite the fact that this does generate a higher level of administrative workload. Fine control with a slightly higher admin load is much better than dumping everything into a couple of big boxes and then having to rummage through them to back up or find files.

My recommendation is as follows - with explanations.

On your primary master (ie bootable) drive you want the following:

one primary (bootable) partition of no more than 20 GB and the rest of the space allocated to an extended partition.

Your primary partition aka C:\ Drive should contain the following:

1) your operating system, including things like fonts installed by word processors, graphics packages like CorelDraw and any other ancillary files these apps install onto the C drive.

2) all hardware drivers you need - MoBo, joystick/mouse, video, sound etc.

3) all system-related utilities - your anti-virus, anti-spam, security, disc / system management utilities (eg Norton SystemWorks etc). You want to be able to access these apps at all times, as long as your system boots up.

4) all specialized apps like Adobe Acrobat reader, Quicktime, image viewers like ACDSEE, and anything else of a similar nature. See note 3 re access.

5) you will need to ensure that there is at least 2 to 4 GB of available free space for print spooling, especially if you are using an inkjet printer at photo-level resolutions. If there is not enough free space on the drive after the print job is set up it will fail and a system lockup is very likely. Older printers are more prone to this than newer ones.

6) IE puts its bookmarks, history and temporary cache files etc on the C drive, as do other browsers by default. If you are not willing to change this you need to provide space on the drive for these files.

7) the TEMP directory under Windows resides on the C drive. Space needs to be allocated for these files, keeping the comment about print spool files in mind.

I run a dual boot system with Win9x & Win 2K. The issues raised above are relevent to both OSs. WinXP is an extended version of Win2K and most of the caveats and constraints that apply to Win2K also apply to XP. All claims to the contrary from MS notwithstanding.

Your Extended Partition should contain the following logical drives.

1) a seperate partition for your page/swap file. Max size is 14 GB. This will prevent the swap file from fragmenting all aother drives in the system. Less of a problem with XP, but it does vary dynamically, which will result in fragmentation. Keep comments above re size wrt physical RAM in mind.

2) a drive on which you install all non-utility/system applications like office suites, graphics suites, cad-cam, e-mail clients (non-MS), digital camera and video editing etc. In short all your "business" and personal stuff. This partition should be between 5 and 15 GB in size. You want to install your mainline apps on a drive other than C to keep from running out of space on the C drive. See your need to expand your C drive. For e-mail clients, installing on a dedicated "apps" drive will also reduce the consumption of disc space on the C drive as you get e-mails because the default location for incoming e-mails is drive c. Indeed, some non-MS e-mail clients allow you to specify exactly where the mail should be stored, so you want that somewhere else dedicated for data.

3) a drive dedicated for data files you generate. Depending on type of files up to 30 GB size. This means all documents, databases, graphics files, any e-mails if possible, digital images from cameras, scans, videos you have made etc. It can include selected documents downloded from the Web. The reason you want a seperate data drive is security. In short, backup of work you have done. This is the stuff that you have spent time on and/or need to keep for records purposes. Much easier to archive/back-up data if all the files arer on one dedicated drive. After all, you don't need to back up the apps, or OS or utilities, since you have the original CDs, etc. for these apps. Why consume media backing up stuff you already have the original discs for? And if it is, in fact, necessary to re-install from scratch due to a system problem, what do you care about more - the apps for which you have the CDs anyway, or the files you spent time and effort creating?

4) Downloads / Temporary files / Music files
a) a seperate partition for your MP3 downloads / CD rips - backup is the issue here again. Size dependent on quantity of files.

b) seprate partition for "serious" downloads. Size between 5 and 10 GB, depending on avaialble disk space. This drive dedicated to downloads of things like hardware driver and BIOS updates, upgraded versions of things like Quicktime, Acrobat reader, application software, OS, DirectX, game patch files, and any other files that you download that are non-trivial (like work-related stuff) that may have required a lot of effort to find. Back-up is the main issue here, but easy, organized access to these files is also a consideration.

c) a partition for "fun", temporary, miscellaneous images and docs and vids files, Also, a place to put the cahes of any web browsers you use. Size is 15 to 30 GB. This is where you put the temporary stuff, before you decide to move it to permanent storage. And browser cache files should go here too - why consume space for this stuff on the C drive where the browsers default to if you don't have to? Easier to find and delete too.

5) Games

Partition size depends on number of games you have.

Seperate partitions for games is a good idea for two reasons.
a) it saves installtion space on the C drive (same idea as seperate apps drive)
b) games often create large quantities of temporary files, which you don't want on the C drive.

If you have a second hard drive installed in your system, create a small (approx 4 GB) primary partition and a large extended partition. The extended partition should be divided into logical partitions applying the same logic as described above for the first hard drive. A smaller number of larger partitions will work here.
October 1, 2006 3:10:03 AM

thank You all for the replies, lol many since i last checked, thx, it is quite late today, so I will try to "mess" with all this tomorow morning, in regards to some questions

the I anfd H partitions are on a separate drive, I use the "I" partition for all internet downloads/patches(basically all internet related things)
H holds all my backups(sort of a quick all in one place ssytem restore spot)

C is my main partition, D holds all aplications/ie, and such, G is for games only , and I might ad there some rendering software (or to the D drive)

I tried to add just 1 gb more to have 7.8 or 7.9 gigs on the c drive but i get the 2003 error even then

1 more question:
Is it possible to swich the C drive to NTFS from Fat 32 without loosing any data? that is now after i have the whole ssytem setup?

Where do i go to the CHKDISK? i used the nortons disk doetor and i got no errors or such with it.
October 1, 2006 4:10:08 AM

Quote:
But, what I would personally do is use ghost. Ghost the C drive, resize the partition with fdisk, and then pull the ghost image back. As long as the image of the system disk is good and there isn't anything funky with the data from using PM, then all should be OK and you won't have to reload the OS.


Quick and easy. Totally the way to go at this junction.
a c 371 G Storage
October 1, 2006 4:11:00 AM

Quote:

1 more question:
Is it possible to swich the C drive to NTFS from Fat 32 without loosing any data? that is now after i have the whole ssytem setup?


XP has a convert utility. Open a command/dos window and type "convert /?" for options. You should back up your C drive before doing it, although it shouldn't destroy your files. I'm not sure if you'll be able to run this on a system disk as it needs to unmount the volume. Also, I'm not sure it will be able to function since you're low on disk space.

Quote:

Where do i go to the CHKDISK? i used the nortons disk doetor and i got no errors or such with it.


You can run "chkdsk c: /f" from a command/dos window or open "my computer", right-click the C drive, select properties, then the tools tab. Click "check now" under error checking and select the "fix errors" box. Since it's a system drive, it will need to reboot. Answer yes to check at next reboot, then do so.
October 1, 2006 5:22:23 AM

Quote:
thank You all for the replies, lol many since i last checked, thx, it is quite late today, so I will try to "mess" with all this tomorow morning, in regards to some questions

the I anfd H partitions are on a separate drive, I use the "I" partition for all internet downloads/patches(basically all internet related things)
H holds all my backups(sort of a quick all in one place ssytem restore spot)

C is my main partition, D holds all aplications/ie, and such, G is for games only , and I might ad there some rendering software (or to the D drive)

I tried to add just 1 gb more to have 7.8 or 7.9 gigs on the c drive but i get the 2003 error even then

1 more question:
Is it possible to swich the C drive to NTFS from Fat 32 without loosing any data? that is now after i have the whole ssytem setup?

Where do i go to the CHKDISK? i used the nortons disk doetor and i got no errors or such with it.


OK, I did a Google search: "Partition Magic error 2003" and found the actual error is: "Error 2003 File size does not match FAT allocation for file"
see HERE

Chkdsk /f should fix the problem. From within My Computer, right click C:. choose properties, click the tools tab, click Check Now. The options for Chkdsk are displayed. The first box when checked is equivalent to
chkdsk /f and the second is chkdsk /s which will scan for physical errors and can be quite time consuming but probably not necessary in this case.

However, it may be that new truncated files are created on your C drive everytime you boot Windows with the limited space available. Have you looked at your event logs? There may be a clue there.

Move some files to another volume to free up some space, and then do a chkdsk /f, empty and delete volume J to free up contiguous unallocated space, resize C:, then put your files back. Once done, you should be able to partition to your liking.
October 1, 2006 11:17:33 AM

Partition Magic is an amazing package. But you really should get the most recent version, which is 8.01. It has better support for XP than version 7. It also supports Linux file systems. The only concern is that Symantec bought PowerQuest about 2 years ago, so you will need to get patch files from there now. Also, there has been no aditional development of the package since Symantec bought it.

Partition Magic can convert FAT32 to NTFS easily. And in the other direction as well, unlike the MS utility. Not to mention FAT16. And it can convert either one of those to native Linux file systems and vice versa. It can even merge partitions.

PM has an extremely good defragmenting capability. It also does a very good disk check which can be run in standalone mode, and is run by default whenever a partition is moved. It checks at a very low level, so it takes some time, but I have never seen it generate bad data or problems.

PM has an excellent application mover utility, and a path correction utility for when you change the drive letters etc.

And these are the main features only. Lots more amazing goodies that are extremely useful.

But ya really do need to read the effing manual. It even tells you what those error messages mean and what causes them (now you can fix the cause of said message). And the manual has a pretty good tutorial on hard drive structure, operation and configuration. Knowledge of which would have saved the OP much grief and aggro. But, WTF, we don't need no steeengkeeeng manaul - we're "experts" by osmosis.

I have been using PM since version 2. That would way back Before Windows (BW). In the time of DOS (MS or IBM-PC or DR-DOS). And I have never had any problems with PM. Mind you, I take a carefull approach, make efforts to understand the hardware and RTFM.

At least one poster here has claimed seriously bad experiences but hasn't given any details. I have a sneaky feeling that the problems were the result of user errors in terms of failing to understand the hardware, not R-ingTFM and getting overambitious. I could be wrong.

Those posters suggesting the use of Ghost to image the drive, followed by using Windows to resize the c partition, then reinstalling the image on the expanded drive are overlooking two critical details.

Detail one is that Windows repartitioning software is destructive. Of all existing partitions on the drive. The tool used is still called Fdisk. So it is not enough to image the C partition, the entire disk has to be imaged.

Detail two is that restoring an image made of a smaller partition to a larger partition will likely NOT work. When Windows installs it creates logs of the hardware it is installed on. If there is a discrepancy between what Windows thinks it should see and what is physically present, it won't work at all. Now, XP may be smarter than older versions, but I doubt it. MS has a poor track record in this regard. I learned this the hard way. Mind you, Ghost may be able to correct for this, but again, the manual must be consulted.

Three things strike me as I peruse this thread.

First, the obvious failures to check the documentation that comes with the software (and hardware) you are using. Most of the issues raised in this discussion are dealt with in the manual for PM.

Second, the lack of thorough knowledge of how the hardware you own is designed and operates. Not on a physical level, but on a logical and conceptual level.

Third, the lack of explanations, caveats, and aggresiveness of proposed solutions in many posts is appalling. Especially when the fact that, in this case, a persons data is at genuine risk of loss.

In business, the biggest issue related to systems failures is the loss of data. It takes time and effort to generate the data, or to find specific information (of whatever sort) on hte internet. And files downloaded from the web are frequently available only for short periods of time. To put this in a context familiar to a majority of users on this site look at patch files for games. There are some games out there that were HUGE in their day, but the companies that produced them are no longer in business. Just try and get patch files for older games. And even product that is still available for sale in the discount bins can be hard to get patch files for.

I wonder how many of you would appreciate the consequeces of your own advice to your personal systems. Especially if you lost data. And we won't even go into the time and money issues other than to mention them.
October 1, 2006 1:00:36 PM

I understand putting Windows on it's own partition, as that keeps crashes from messing up saved data and really ruining your day. You can reformat and reload xp without touching your programs.

But it seems to me that making all those partitions serves no real purpose (separate folders would do the same thing), and likely slows your rig down. Not to mention it won't help if the hdd dies. Separate hard drives would accomplish all that safely, but that's not what you're doing.

I had a customer once who had 26 partitions on one drive (and that was when an 8gig hdd was huge), but I forgot to ask him why. Just what is the purpose? :?
October 1, 2006 1:07:03 PM

I agree, 2 partitions is what I use. Create seperate folders not partitions for your various sections. It's much more efficient use of space.
October 1, 2006 5:20:18 PM

Thank You all for the help, I think I solved my problem by myselfe lol,
I did the CKDISK all tests/repairs, and it found no errors(thats good)
but after rethinking my problem i figured out that Im doing everything as i once did before, so i went into my bios and searched for the hd options, and i found an option "32 Bit data transfer" and i Enabled it (it was disabled) saved setings, and retried the same exact thing that I did yesterday, and it all worked i could add more space ( I aded 1 gig more) to my C drive without any problems, and i deleted the J Partition, since i didnt need it. So now I will be able to atleast instal Dreamweaver and Photoshop to create the websites i needed (lol....relieved)Thank You all for the help, but I have one more question that I would like to ask:

I have about 22 Gb of unalocated space and my C drive has now 7.79 GB, I was wondering wheather I can add more space(namely the entire unalocated space(22BG) to the C drive? When I trie to add more space in the same way as I previously did I receive a message (the one in the box below, regarding the cylinder boundry, and the hd being not bootable)

http://img287.imageshack.us/my.php?image=hd2fm8.jpg

Is there any way that i could add more space to the hd without worrying about any problems as such? Such as creating another partition and merging them, would that work, or add more "free space" from other partitions, or basicaly the cilinder boundry is phisical, and there is no way around it?

What is the size limit of a FAT32 partition?

Thank You.
October 1, 2006 9:09:23 PM

There should be no problem if you re-size the c partition to the full amount of unallocated space. The warning you see is a reference to early limitations of BIOS and hard disk structure. 1024 cylinders works out to about 4 GB.

This limitation was worked around by the technique of Large Block Addressing (LBA) in your BIOS settings. Just check that this setting is enabled for your hard drives in the BIOS and you are good to go.

But you should still seriously consider converting your FAT32 partition to NTFS. Since you haven't indicated that you are running a dual-boot system, I don't see any reason for staying with FAT32. Also, if I recall correctly, the maximum size for a FAT32 partition is 32 GB. You may want to consider checking out Microsoft's knowledgebase to verify that last statement.

With respect to the discussion about several smaller partitions vs use of folders in a large single partition, it is a matter of personal preferance. There is merit to both sides of the discussion. I personally prefer to have a greater degree of segregation for administrative convenience and security reasons. Others find the approach of having everything in one big box with lots of folders and subfolders easier and consider this to be secure enough. Different strokes - whatever works for you. But you may want to keep in mind the fact that many hardcore IT professionals and security experts reccomend against the one big box approach. The scheme I described in my earlier post will work well, but it is only a suggestion, after all, and you are free to ignore it, use as is or modified. Keep in mind that going with the one large box approach is subject to path-length limitations when you are setting up backups. Some of the back-up software out there, even from big-name sources is still subject to older limitations for backwards compatability. Even worse in some cases is that older versions of software are "upgraded" to newer versions of OS, without changing the core programming. See software for kids for example - packages sold today still require 256 colour mode and won't run in higher modes. These were originally released in Win 3x days, when 256 colours was good. But why haven't the manufacturers of the software revised the core programming to deal with this issue? Points to ponder indeed.

Good luck.
October 1, 2006 10:42:44 PM

Thank You for the reply, i have 22 gb of unalocated , and 7.79 gb of alocated(c partition) space, so i would still be below the 32 gb limit, for now i just need to make the drive a bit more biger, (im just to byzy to play around with the backups, and whatnot, not enough time) I will check my bios for LBA, i thought that if i will go above that limit that i might risk the system becoming unstable, or it wont boot
October 1, 2006 11:34:24 PM

If you are worried about taking risks, use True Image 9 to backup your OS partition before you resize it.
October 2, 2006 9:51:59 AM

Fat 32 can address up to 127.5 gig, with a file size limit of 4 gig less 232 bytes (I'm sure of the former, but fuzzy on the latter). But even then you can still force the issue with LBA.

But they are right about ntfs. It is much more stable than fat32, plus it runs faster with less hangups. I don't run anything with fat32 anymore.
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