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choosing a c2d processor to overclock

Last response: in CPUs
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October 1, 2006 5:18:30 PM

Currently, I've gotten most of the parts to my computer. The motherboard is a p5b deluxe, and the ram is 2x 2x 1gb corsair ballistix pc2-6400 (4gb total).

I still haven't decided on whether to get the e6600 or e6300. From what I've been reading, it seems like many people are easily getting 3.4ghz+ OCs on the e6300, while it is considerably more difficult for e6600, for whatever reason, to overclock more than maybe 3.2 ghz or so.

Yet if I look at the records for the fastest OCs on all the c2d processors (http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=59...) it's clear to me that the e6600 is definitely better than e6300 at OC'ing, if you look at the fastest CPUs.

Is there any "trick" for OC'ing that is necessary to get that fast? Perhaps there is some more advanced cooling necessary? IIRC, someone said that the p5b deluxe (the board used by the fastest c2d OCs above) doesn't like a certain range of fsb speeds with cpu higher multipliers, and going faster supposedly would help. Does that make sense at all, and is it safe?

btw, if I get the e6300, I will definitely spend the extra money saved on making a diy water cooling / peltier cooling rig. However, if I really, really feel that it would be worth it to give the e6600 additional cooling, i might do the same for it, although more likely I'd go with a nice air cooling system.


And a few basic questions about OC'ing I haven't figured out yet:

Is it the heat or the voltage that kills a processor first, typically? For example, if you had an ideal infinite heatsink, could you ever destroy a processor (i mean within like maybe 2 volts or so, obviously putting 1000 volts across anything will probabaly destroy anything no matter how cool it is)

Also, what typically prevents us from getting very high FSB speeds? Is it perhaps some motherboard component becomes too hot, or because you need more voltage across some component on the motherboard? I know eventually (I've got a bit of experience in electronics) stray capacitance or inductance on the board will eventually degrade digital signals to the point of instability, but considering that some people have gotten 500+mhz fsb, I suspect that some other factor comes into play for people who can't get the fsb so high.
October 1, 2006 5:22:22 PM

i think you should get the e6600 + good air cpu cooler

peltier and liquid cooling are *slightly* :lol:  overkill for a low overclock such as 3.4ghz on c2d. 8)
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