Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Need a scanner that can handle 127 slides + 620 roll film

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Share
April 9, 2004 10:41:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

I hope I am not off topic on this question but I thought I would float
a question on converting film images to digital. My prime concern is
that the family has a number of 127 slides that I would love to
capture, preserve, and pass on copies to each limb on the family tree.

In the mix is some 35mm bw film strips, 35mm slides, 120/620 and even
some 4x5 negatives.

While googling around tonight I viewed hits on the epson 4870 and 4870
pro scanner that initially sounds like it might be the ticket.
However, I also read some comments that it really doesn't have the
resolution that is advertized, software is buggy, ect.

What a bummer. I thought I found a solution. A scanner with enough
resolution to scan my slides and some thing that would be usefull as a
normal scanner after this one time endeavor is complete. Firewire as
an interface a real plus considering data size.


Btw, is it usable as a normal flat bed scanner?

Also I don't understand what the PRO version gives in the bargain. I
don't have photoshop, I use Gimp for image stuff.

I thank you in advance for any info that will guide me to the right
purchase.


Wes
--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
Lycos address is a spam trap.
--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
Lycos address is a spam trap.
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 11:02:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

In article <107e9h996uaku19@corp.supernews.com>, clutch@lycos.com says...
> I hope I am not off topic on this question but I thought I would float
> a question on converting film images to digital. My prime concern is
> that the family has a number of 127 slides that I would love to
> capture, preserve, and pass on copies to each limb on the family tree.
>
> In the mix is some 35mm bw film strips, 35mm slides, 120/620 and even
> some 4x5 negatives.
>
> While googling around tonight I viewed hits on the epson 4870 and 4870
> pro scanner that initially sounds like it might be the ticket.
> However, I also read some comments that it really doesn't have the
> resolution that is advertized, software is buggy, ect.
>
> What a bummer. I thought I found a solution. A scanner with enough
> resolution to scan my slides and some thing that would be usefull as a
> normal scanner after this one time endeavor is complete. Firewire as
> an interface a real plus considering data size.
>
>
> Btw, is it usable as a normal flat bed scanner?
>
> Also I don't understand what the PRO version gives in the bargain. I
> don't have photoshop, I use Gimp for image stuff.
>
> I thank you in advance for any info that will guide me to the right
> purchase.
>
>
> Wes
> --
> Reply to:
> Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
> Lycos address is a spam trap.

Consumer grade flatbeds indeed do not deliver the actual resolving power
that the ppi rating would indicate. However, they do nicely for medium
format and larger film, and indeed are the only cost effective way to do
those. MF film scanners pretty much start at $1800, plus accessories.

Normally, folks here recommend a middle of the road 35mm film scanner AND
a flatbed to cover all bases.

Your 127 "superslides" are the glitch. AFAIK, all 35mm film scanners of
good quality right now are limited to exactly 36x24mm scanning area.
127 is 37x37mm image size, call it 36x36 or so what with slight cropping
by the mount.

Sure you couldn't crop 12mm from most of them, from one side or the other
and still have all the pertinent image area?

You might want to run your question in comp.periphs.scanners, a much
higher traffic group to get more opinions.

Mac
Anonymous
April 10, 2004 3:44:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

"Mac McDougald" posted "...
Your 127 "superslides" are the glitch. AFAIK, all 35mm film scanners of
good quality right now are limited to exactly 36x24mm scanning area.
127 is 37x37mm image size, call it 36x36 or so what with slight cropping
by the mount.
...."

The Nikon "SUPER COOLSCAN 9000 ED" will handle the 127 size, although it does not have a
film holder specifically for that size.
http://www.nikon-image.com/eng/news_release/2003/ls9000...

To cover all of the bases the OP mentioned would probably require something like an Epson
4870 *and* the Coolscan 9000 ED. (Didn't he also say something about 120 / 620 film ?)

As far as the OP's comment "... Also I don't understand what the PRO version gives in the
bargain. ..."

Look at the software and accessories furnished with the two versions. For example, the
"Pro" version includes a few niceities such as a set of IT-8 Calibration Targets
(transmitted *and* reflected) that would probably cost more than the difference in price.
If you need it ... it's definitely worth the difference in price just based on this single
item.





"Mac McDougald" <doogleREMOVE_THIS@netzero.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1ae0f59fa13980ff2013@news.individual.net...
> In article <107e9h996uaku19@corp.supernews.com>, clutch@lycos.com says...
!