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Differences of AMD and intel

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Last response: in CPUs
October 5, 2006 4:25:49 PM

my knowledge on CPU's is quite limited, so i'd be greatful if someone could clear some things up for me.
I'm looking at upgrading sometime in the near future, and i'm pondering over AMD and Intel. I've been told that the older generation of AMD CPU's, (the 4000+ / 3800 ) show better performance for games over Intels faster 3.0-3.6Ghz P4 processors, whether or not this is true i dont know. Also, the AMD processors run at 2.4Ghz, how does this differ to a regular P4 2.4Ghz? which i'm currently running. Finally, I'm also aware that AM2 is beginning to phase out the Socket 939 processors, although i've only seen the 3200 and 3800 series of AMD processors being currently produced in AM2, would i be better investing in AM2, or going for Socket 939?

thanks,

More about : differences amd intel

October 5, 2006 7:43:10 PM

Coming from an AMD fanboy, I'd say go with the Intel Core 2 Duo. :idea: If you're on a budget, an E6300 for about $180; E6600 for $315 is ideal for price to performance, and they overclock wonderfully by all accounts (I will find out firsthand very soon). Be a man, order all the parts for a PC, DIY, save a ton of cash, and OC it... then laugh at your friends who paid Dell $4000 for a PC that does the same thing yours does. Make yourself a budget, I find I can make a butt-stompin' PC for around $2000 (monitor, mouse, keyboard and speakers included). Great place to order online is Newegg, if you want exotic components go to FrozenCPU.

PDH-NicFury
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October 5, 2006 8:52:17 PM

Quote:
my knowledge on CPU's is quite limited, so i'd be greatful if someone could clear some things up for me.
I'm looking at upgrading sometime in the near future, and i'm pondering over AMD and Intel. I've been told that the older generation of AMD CPU's, (the 4000+ / 3800 ) show better performance for games over Intels faster 3.0-3.6Ghz P4 processors, whether or not this is true i dont know.


To expand your knowledge a little bit. Intel has released the Core 2 Duo (C2D) CPU not too long ago. Gone are the days of the Pentium 4. C2D is a departure from the old P4 days. Intel used to be all about GHz, but they took a page from AMD's book and now GHz is no longer king. It's all about the design of the CPU (a.k.a. the architecture).

You are correct in regards to the Athlon 64 vs the Pentium 4. Clock for clock the Athlon 64 is better at games than the P4, that's how AMD won a lot of people over. AMD's CPUs is more about efficiency, that's why a slower A64 can beat a faster P4. Over the years Intel has been preaching speed, first MHz, then GHz. AMD slowly converted people over to their more efficient CPUs.

The Athlon 64 ruled over the Penitum 4 gaming wise, but the P4 was still king of content creation and multimedia applications. Then AMD released the A64 X2 and more or less owned just about every single benchmark over the P4 D, even content creation and multimedia apps.

Welcome to today. The Core 2 Duo has re-invigorated Intel. C2D surpasses the performance of every single CPU in AMD's arsenal. The slowest of all C2D CPU, E6300 @ 1.83GHz, is equal in performance to the A64 X2 4200/4400 (depending on the benchmark). When overclocked, the E6300 can give the Athlon FX-62 (AMD's fastest and most expensive desktop CPU) a run for it's money. AMD slashed prices on nearly all of their CPUs to be competitive with Intel.

Your budget should determine who's CPU you will buy. With a budget of under $150 it's AMD's A64. With a budget of $180 it's Intel's C2D. What about $151 - $179? The smart thing to do is spend a little extra money and get a C2D.

Upgradeability? AMD has stated that their next generation CPU will be compatible with Socket AM2. So if you stick the future K8L CPU (or whatever it's gonna be called in 2007/2008) into a socket AM2 motherboard from today it will work. What about Intel? It's not known what socket their next generation CPU will use (2008/2009). Their current socket LGA775 has been around for 2 years will it survive another 2 or 3 years? Doubtful, but who knows?
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October 5, 2006 8:52:40 PM

CPU architectures differ greatly between manufacturers and generations. The older Pentium 4 architecture is less efficient than the current AMD architecture, hence the P4 is outperformed by a lower clocked AMD processor. However Intel's new Core 2 architecture is more efficient than the current AMD architecture, hence a lower clocked Core 2 processor outperforms the AMD proccessor.

I would look toward a Core 2 processor, if for some reason you are bent on AMD go with the AM2 socket as it will allow an upgrade path should you need it in the future.
Anonymous
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October 5, 2006 9:13:27 PM

To summarize, it's not only about many steps it does in one second, it's also about how efficient these steps are. It's called IPC(Instruction per Clock) so a 1.8ghz processor with twice the IPC will perform the same as a 3.6 ghz.

Best analogy is having 100 person carrying 1 log of wood vs 50 carrying 2 and half, the second is faster...

Now on the other hand any Cpu will have it's strenght and it's weakness. So you can always find a particular scenario were AMD or Intel will shine simply because it suits there architecture better...
October 6, 2006 9:11:26 AM

thanks for clearing this up for me. Everybody i've spoken to has reccomended the C2D so i'm pretty much sold.
Just to continue on what labbby said; is the IPC standard for C2D processors? or does it vary from model to model, and if so, how can you find out? the general specification doesn't seem to include any information on it.

i've got my eye on this one specifically:

http://www.dabs.com/productview.aspx?Quicklinx=44HC&Cat...

so from what you said, assuming this has 2xIPC, it will run at 4.26Ghz?



thanks.
October 6, 2006 9:36:03 AM

No, IPC that labbby was talking about is a measure of efficiency. To put it simple, a cpu clock is a measurement of how fast a cpu can finish a work load. IPC is a measurement of how big of that work load a cpu can do.

So, C2D may clock slower than P4 or Pentium D ( slower in finishing a work load) but it can do a bigger load ( higher IPC rating) everytime. Hence at the end, C2D will finish the job quicker.

E6400 has 2 cores, each running at 2.13ghz. Only software that is designed for mulitcores can show a significant difference when running on 2 or more cores.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
October 6, 2006 2:50:41 PM

Yeah that was a really simplistic explanation just to make you understand that clock speed is not everything, it does still play an important role WITHIN the same architecture (P4 vs P4, X2 vs X2, etc).

IPC is just a general measure , it will be diferent when going from one architecture to another, Ahtlon X2 vs Core 2 Duo, etc. Read More here..
Manfacturer will not always publish the IPC of a processor, you ultimately find out by looking at the performance in relation to the clock speed.

It's been said that Intel Core 2 Duo is about 25% faster than a Ahtlon X2 at the same clock speed. These figure are general an not accurate for every task.