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Need Help! will my os tranfer?

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October 6, 2006 3:00:41 PM

i'm making a new pc to play wow and bf 2142....

i currently have a 2.4 p4 sony vaio pc back from 2002.

the parts are all junk, so the only thing i'd really like to keep is the os and whats on my drives.

is it possible to simply hook up the 80 gig hard disk on this system onto my newly built core 2 duo system?

i really dont want to have to go out and spent 100 bucks buying windows xp.

the vaio system came with windows xp when i bought it, but it was literally on the system when i got it....

i have a disk for reformatting the system, but that's it.

can someone tell me what i need to do to get this working?

is it just as simply as hooking up my hd to my new mobo?

or will it be rejected since it was last used on a completely different system?

More about : tranfer

a b Ý World of Warcraft
October 6, 2006 3:12:26 PM

You're gonna have to install Windows XP since the hardware will be radically different. You can try to simply hook the HD up to the new system, but just have $$$ on the side for the actual install CD.
Related resources
October 6, 2006 3:31:59 PM

so your saying it's not going to work?

or i can try, but 99% it wont work?
October 6, 2006 3:46:30 PM

Ummm... it's illegal.

Read your licence agreement w/ Microsoft.
October 6, 2006 3:47:29 PM

lol... can you explain why?

i'm destroying the old pc, and tranfering the os to a new one.

if it's not illegal to update your graphics card, or your ram, why is it illegal to upgrade your motherboard?

how is that illegal?

another thing. which license agreement, of the 500k you need to agree to just to operate a computer? would that be in the first 100k, 2nd 100k... you know, try to narrow it down for me, you pretentious f#%@
October 6, 2006 3:50:29 PM

Your OS from Sony was given to you with an OEM lisence. It is illegal to install it on any computer but the one it was originally installed on. And no, it will almost certainly not transfer well.
October 6, 2006 3:51:54 PM

so it was illegal to upgrade my graphics card, because it didnt come with the original comp?

again, what is the fundamental difference between upgrading your mobo or cpu, and upgrading your cd drive, or your ram, or your gfx?

i really dont see how my mobo is any more integral than my ram or my cd drive, or my gfx.
a b Ý World of Warcraft
October 6, 2006 3:53:41 PM

Quote:
so your saying it's not going to work?

or i can try, but 99% it wont work?


Windows XP stores your hardware info somewhere (wpa.dbl ??) and it compares your current hardware to that list. I think I read somewhere if 3 or more hardware is different then Windows XP will not allow you log in.

You can give it a try, but I doubt it will work.
October 6, 2006 4:05:05 PM

Quote:

Windows XP stores your hardware info somewhere (wpa.dbl ??) and it compares your current hardware to that list. I think I read somewhere if 3 or more hardware is different then Windows XP will not allow you log in.

You can give it a try, but I doubt it will work.


Actually, if you're running a corporate copy you can change the hardware an unlimited number of times without Winblows asking to reactivate. As for retail or OEM copies of XP, five different pieces of hardware within 12 months is the limit. But good luck trying to find a copy of corporate and a key that will pass Windows Genuine Advantage validation anymore.

As for transferring, try Norton Ghost 10 (you can find torrents) but most likely you're going to get a BSOD with a page-fault error since the hardware won't match what XP has stored. You're almost definately SOL and stuck dropping $300 for a new copy of XP Pro, but you can most likely find local mom & pop comp shops that will sell you an OEM copy for $130-$160 if you buy some hardware with it. That's probably your best bet since clean installs are best and the most problem free when upgrading everything.
October 6, 2006 4:07:55 PM

if i buy windows xp media center 2005 for 106 bucks from new egg, can i upgrade to vista when it comes out with the discount?

lol.... what's so good about pro that you paid 300 bucks for it?
October 6, 2006 4:09:50 PM

Quote:

Windows XP stores your hardware info somewhere (wpa.dbl ??) and it compares your current hardware to that list. I think I read somewhere if 3 or more hardware is different then Windows XP will not allow you log in.

You can give it a try, but I doubt it will work.


Actually, if you're running a corporate copy you can change the hardware an unlimited number of times without Winblows asking to reactivate. As for retail or OEM copies of XP, five times is the limit. But good luck trying to find a copy of corporate and a key that will pass Windows Genuine Advantage validation anymore.

As for transferring, try Norton Ghost 10 (you can find torrents) but most likely you're going to get a BSOD with a page-fault error since the hardware won't match what XP has stored. You're almost definately SOL and stuck dropping $300 for a new copy of XP Pro, but you can most likely find local mom & pop comp shops that will sell you an OEM copy for $130-$160 if you buy some hardware with it. That's probably your best bet since clean installs are best
and the most problem free when upgrading everything.

what's bsod mean

what's a torrent

what's sol, so out of luck?

oem is...?

what is the diff between oem and a regular copy or item?

sorry about all this, kinda new =0
October 6, 2006 4:12:17 PM

Yeah you can upgrade, BUT I think it's going to be $300 for the upgrade version of Vista ultimate (don't waste your money on anything less or upgrading is pointless) regardless of which version of XP you have. And to boot Media Center Edition only works with select hardware, so if that's the route you want to take make sure all your hardware is on the compatiblilty list.
October 6, 2006 4:18:15 PM

why is ultimate the version you want?

i i thought it was 260 to upgrade, and 400 to buy it new

is ultimate the only one with dx10 and thenew shiny ui?

again thanks for all your help, please if someone could also explain the terms i asked about too =0
October 6, 2006 4:18:42 PM

Quote:

what's bsod mean

what's a torrent

what's sol, so out of luck?

oem is...?

what is the diff between oem and a regular copy or item?

sorry about all this, kinda new =0


BSOD= blue screen of death, your computer freezes/locks up

SOL= sh*t outta luck

OEM=original equipment manufacturer - companies like HP & Dell buy "OEM" copies of windows in mass volumes, it's just the install CD and a certificate of authenticity sticker which you slap on your tower. The difference is PRICE!

torrent= a file that is a tracker to download something off the BitTorrent network (music, movies, etc.) Do a Google search on it, it'll tell ya.

And as for ultimate, it has support for multiple processors (or multi-core ones), AMD64 and EM64T support, and has all the features and yes, the new UI Aero.
October 6, 2006 4:21:21 PM

i think if found a new 'life phrase'...

sol...=O

that's what they should name windows next os.

the 'sol' edition =)
October 6, 2006 4:23:14 PM

Quote:
i think if found a new 'life phrase'...

sol...=O

that's what they should name windows next os.

the 'sol' edition =)


:lol: 
October 6, 2006 4:23:53 PM

Quote:

what's bsod mean

what's a torrent

what's sol, so out of luck?

oem is...?

what is the diff between oem and a regular copy or item?

sorry about all this, kinda new =0


BSOD= blue screen of death, your computer freezes/locks up

SOL= sh*t outta luck

OEM=original equipment manufacturer - companies like HP & Dell buy "OEM" copies of windows in mass volumes, it's just the install CD and a certificate of authenticity sticker which you slap on your tower. The difference is PRICE!

torrent= a file that is a tracker to download something off the BitTorrent network (music, movies, etc.) Do a Google search on it, it'll tell ya.

And as for ultimate, it has support for multiple processors (or multi-core ones) and has all the features and yes, the new UI Aero.

so what does it have that the other editions dont have... that a gamer would use?

i'm pretty sure all of them dont have aero... which ones have aero and dual support? only ultimate?

does vista have 64 bit support? isnt that what core 2 and amd are now based off of?
October 6, 2006 4:26:05 PM

Only Premium and Ultimate have Aero, but ONLY Ultimate has the 64-bit extention support and multiple cpu/core support.
October 6, 2006 4:30:43 PM

Quote:
lol... can you explain why?

i'm destroying the old pc, and tranfering the os to a new one.

if it's not illegal to update your graphics card, or your ram, why is it illegal to upgrade your motherboard?

how is that illegal?

another thing. which license agreement, of the 500k you need to agree to just to operate a computer? would that be in the first 100k, 2nd 100k... you know, try to narrow it down for me, you pretentious f#%@


The OEM license is linked to the motherboard (even though it is almost the most functionless piece of the PC) Its also one of the problems with bought PC's, not having the disks.

If you had the disk you may be able to re-register (not the real terminology I know) with microsoft through a phone call.

I'm not sure precisely which license agreement it is in, but essentially the Mobo is 'the original equipment' in an OEM license, everything else is treated as a peripheral to the mobo.

I suggest that you watch your language if you want help, I'm only helping as it is bad news for you. Asking nicely will get you a lot further in life.
October 6, 2006 4:37:46 PM

It's illegal because it violates the contract you made with Mircorsoft.

Quote:
another thing. which license agreement, of the 500k you need to agree to just to operate a computer? would that be in the first 100k, 2nd 100k... you know, try to narrow it down for me, you pretentious f#%@

Nice mouth you ignoramous.
October 6, 2006 4:41:10 PM

i signed 500k.

think i might have... skipped reading jus a few of those?
October 6, 2006 4:44:45 PM

Quote:
lol... can you explain why?

i'm destroying the old pc, and tranfering the os to a new one.

if it's not illegal to update your graphics card, or your ram, why is it illegal to upgrade your motherboard?

how is that illegal?

another thing. which license agreement, of the 500k you need to agree to just to operate a computer? would that be in the first 100k, 2nd 100k... you know, try to narrow it down for me, you pretentious f#%@


The OEM license is linked to the motherboard (even though it is almost the most functionless piece of the PC) Its also one of the problems with bought PC's, not having the disks.

If you had the disk you may be able to re-register (not the real terminology I know) with microsoft through a phone call.

I'm not sure precisely which license agreement it is in, but essentially the Mobo is 'the original equipment' in an OEM license, everything else is treated as a peripheral to the mobo.

I suggest that you watch your language if you want help, I'm only helping as it is bad news for you. Asking nicely will get you a lot further in life.

i only swear at random asshole internet entities that ask me if i read 1 out of the 500k 50 page ms contracts i've agreed to thus far.

being nice to real people in real life works tho =)

thanks for your help...

lol... not going to buy a prebuilt system again
October 6, 2006 4:51:44 PM

Although I've recently asked this question myself to see if there was anything more I could do. I've dealt with the problem in the shop many a time.

There are a couple steps that I take in order to assure myself theres no way possible that it'll transfer to the new mobo/cpu setup.

1. Setting up new hardware then connecting boot HDD to see if it'll just work.
2. After installing the new hardware, attempting a Repair install of Windows XP, this works 40-50% of the time.

If those don't work I pretty much consider it a wipe and reinstall, backing up optional and all that depending on if its needed or not.

If either step works, more often then not when you attempt to activate it will give you a message saying something along the lines of This key has been used too often or something to the sort.

Now here is where I question whether or not it's illegal to do this. Because after I get a message like this I use the Telephone feature, get the # for my country (in case you're not from the US) and the Install ID, call them and just hit 0's through the first section to talk to a Live Rep; reason being, the automated machine won't fix the "Installed on too many machines" problem.

Once on the phone with the live rep I simply let them know what message I'm getting, they'll ask you one of two questions usually, "Is this the only machine you've installed this product on?" say "Yes, I just did a large hardware change" or How many times have you installed this product, say "Only once before, for this computer, but since I changed my hardware it won't let me reactivate."

Sometimes sounding somewhat naive is a + =p

Anyway once that is said and done they give me the new install key, i type it in, voila.
October 6, 2006 4:53:18 PM

Your just mad because you are ignorant and I didn't spoon feed you all the information you are lacking.

Do you actually think your argument about your video card was going to change the fact that moving a Microsoft licence from one computer to another is illeagal?

Do you think you only need to purchase one copy of Windows for the rest of your life, and just keep moving it from one computer to the next?
October 6, 2006 4:55:01 PM

Quote:
Although I've recently asked this question myself to see if there was anything more I could do. I've dealt with the problem in the shop many a time.

There are a couple steps that I take in order to assure myself theres no way possible that it'll transfer to the new mobo/cpu setup.

1. Setting up new hardware then connecting boot HDD to see if it'll just work.
2. After installing the new hardware, attempting a Repair install of Windows XP, this works 40-50% of the time.

If those don't work I pretty much consider it a wipe and reinstall, backing up optional and all that depending on if its needed or not.

If either step works, more often then not when you attempt to activate it will give you a message saying something along the lines of This key has been used too often or something to the sort.

Now here is where I question whether or not it's illegal to do this. Because after I get a message like this I use the Telephone feature, get the # for my country (in case you're not from the US) and the Install ID, call them and just hit 0's through the first section to talk to a Live Rep; reason being, the automated machine won't fix the "Installed on too many machines" problem.

Once on the phone with the live rep I simply let them know what message I'm getting, they'll ask you one of two questions usually, "Is this the only machine you've installed this product on?" say "Yes, I just did a large hardware change" or How many times have you installed this product, say "Only once before, for this computer, but since I changed my hardware it won't let me reactivate."

Sometimes sounding somewhat naive is a + =p

Anyway once that is said and done they give me the new install key, i type it in, voila.


I've heard it working too, but you do need a disk, even for the repair option, I think in general they are satisfied that you have actually brought disk for each machine.
October 6, 2006 5:45:07 PM

Quote:
Although I've recently asked this question myself to see if there was anything more I could do. I've dealt with the problem in the shop many a time.

There are a couple steps that I take in order to assure myself theres no way possible that it'll transfer to the new mobo/cpu setup.

1. Setting up new hardware then connecting boot HDD to see if it'll just work.
2. After installing the new hardware, attempting a Repair install of Windows XP, this works 40-50% of the time.

If those don't work I pretty much consider it a wipe and reinstall, backing up optional and all that depending on if its needed or not.

If either step works, more often then not when you attempt to activate it will give you a message saying something along the lines of This key has been used too often or something to the sort.

Now here is where I question whether or not it's illegal to do this. Because after I get a message like this I use the Telephone feature, get the # for my country (in case you're not from the US) and the Install ID, call them and just hit 0's through the first section to talk to a Live Rep; reason being, the automated machine won't fix the "Installed on too many machines" problem.

Once on the phone with the live rep I simply let them know what message I'm getting, they'll ask you one of two questions usually, "Is this the only machine you've installed this product on?" say "Yes, I just did a large hardware change" or How many times have you installed this product, say "Only once before, for this computer, but since I changed my hardware it won't let me reactivate."

Sometimes sounding somewhat naive is a + =p

Anyway once that is said and done they give me the new install key, i type it in, voila.


I've heard it working too, but you do need a disk, even for the repair option, I think in general they are satisfied that you have actually brought disk for each machine.

Yes generally computers I need to do this on usually have had a major hardware change due to something going wrong (motherboard, cpu, etc.). And they have their original CD or at least CD-Key. From there I use the original or an install CD we have on-hand then use their CD-Key, then go through the process I had mentioned.

When I talk to the live rep never are they concerned with what CD I'm using all theyre going by is the CD-Key and its matchup to a different hardware setup, so when I let them know the computers main components have been changed due to repair they pretty much just leave it at that and let me activate =)

EDIT: I should mention, none of the original computers retain their copy of Windows XP unless the harddrive was salvaged onto the new setup. Reason being having two copies of Windows XP with the same 1-User licensed cd-key is obviously illegal. But if the hard drive is transferred or the original went kapoot then there shouldn't be an issue because when you buy the 1-User license agreement you basically agree to install this on only one computer at a time. If the original installation is destroyed or moved to the new set up I don't see it as breakin the EULA; seeing as how it's the same owner, and only installed on one computer.

I'd hate to think everytime I replaced parts in my computer I'd have to buy a new copy of Windows XP, as long as it's not being used on another computer it should still be legal.
October 6, 2006 5:59:36 PM

Quote:
Your just mad because you are ignorant and I didn't spoon feed you all the information you are lacking.

Do you actually think your argument about your video card was going to change the fact that moving a Microsoft licence from one computer to another is illeagal?

Do you think you only need to purchase one copy of Windows for the rest of your life, and just keep moving it from one computer to the next?


So, by your logic SciPunk, if a person changed out the mobo in their Sony, that copy of windows is now invalid/illegal....even if it was the exact same model/version of mobo. Do OEM licenses really state that you cannot change the hardware that the OS runs or....do they state that you are legally bound to not install that OS/license key on more than one computer at a time?
October 6, 2006 6:30:02 PM

Well it's not my logic, it's the logic of Micorsoft Corp and their marketing department's army of lawyers.

And yes, that's exactly what THEY're saying. Your copy of Windows is licenced to a particular computer. Of course the definition of the word "computer" is completely ambiguous... so they go ahead and make up their own definition. Change enough stuff in that computer and THEY will deem that to be a new computer.

It reminds me of the joke about the guy who owns the axe that George Washington used to chop down his father's cherry tree. Of course he has changed the axe head since then... and the handle.

If anybody has a problem with this, don't blame me. I think it's as ludicrous as you do... probably more so.

The solution? Linux. That has exactly the licence agreement we all want.

Now if only enough people would use it so the game developers would write for it !!!!
October 6, 2006 7:30:41 PM

1.1 Installation and use. You may install, use, access, display and run one
copy of the Software on a single computer, such as a workstation, terminal or other
device (“Workstation Computer”). The Software may not be used by more than two (2)
processors at any one time on any single Workstation Computer.

Actual installation and use license from Microsoft. Doesnt say jack about upgrading the mobo as long as its used on ONE computer.
October 6, 2006 11:05:33 PM

Quote:
1.1 Installation and use. You may install, use, access, display and run one
copy of the Software on a single computer, such as a workstation, terminal or other
device (“Workstation Computer”). The Software may not be used by more than two (2)
processors at any one time on any single Workstation Computer.

Actual installation and use license from Microsoft. Doesnt say jack about upgrading the mobo as long as its used on ONE computer.


According to that, wouldn't that mean running it on a quad-core system would be an infringment?
October 6, 2006 11:08:35 PM

its all about the OEM part of the license, the reason its a cheaper license is that it is one-shot i.e. for the original equipement.

but call them and they are generally ok from what I can tell.
October 7, 2006 12:25:49 AM

Before you blow all your money on new HDDs and new OS's, try this.

There's a tool called sysprep that is normally used only by sysadmins (which I am) that allow one to "repackage" a WinXP installation. Sysprep is part of Win XP deployment tools or development tools or something like that. Go look for it on google.

I've only used it with corporate editions of Win XP pro but what it does is tell the OS to go through PnP detection again. It doesn't ask you to reenter the license key. I don't see why it won't work with non corporate editions because it's the tool that OEMs use to create their inital install images.

BTW, keys that pass windows validation exist. But I won't say where and I don't really care anyways as I'm a linux person. But they are out there...
October 7, 2006 1:27:11 AM

Quote:

i really dont want to have to go out and spent 100 bucks buying windows xp.



For some unknown reason there are some people that think software should be free. They see an installation CD and ask themselves; how much does this cost, 50 cents? Why does Microsoft charge so much?

Well here's the bottom line, if you can't afford the $100 for the OS, you can't afford the computer system.
October 7, 2006 1:44:56 AM

Quote:
so your saying it's not going to work?

or i can try, but 99% it wont work?


Windows XP stores your hardware info somewhere (wpa.dbl ??) and it compares your current hardware to that list. I think I read somewhere if 3 or more hardware is different then Windows XP will not allow you log in.

You can give it a try, but I doubt it will work.

Firstly, it just requires re-authentication... Microsoft can make a determination whether to allow it.

YOur problem is less the fact you ahve an OEM license than the fact you have a Sont OEM WIndows version. Most (if not all) major vendors check for their code on the motherboard in determining if the OS should load, it will refuse to load on a different system if this is the case. Regular OEM cd's depend more on the component changes etc. You can go froma P4 to a Core 2 Duo (done it) it just depends on how many things are truely different.

I'd say theres a 99% chance you will have to buy an OS in your case, might as well buy an OEM one with the hardware, or you can buy a full copy and not ahve to worry about buying a new copy everytime you change PC's....
October 7, 2006 6:33:47 PM

Quote:

i really dont want to have to go out and spent 100 bucks buying windows xp.



For some unknown reason there are some people that think software should be free. They see an installation CD and ask themselves; how much does this cost, 50 cents? Why does Microsoft charge so much?

Well here's the bottom line, if you can't afford the $100 for the OS, you can't afford the computer system.

I don't believe the idea here is that the software is free.. The idea is that everytime you upgrade your computer you shouldn't have to buy a new copy of the same software.

IE. Motherboard/CPU fry, you swap those out, should you have to pay ANOTHER 100$ because of this mishap?
October 7, 2006 7:14:11 PM

Quote:

i really dont want to have to go out and spent 100 bucks buying windows xp.



For some unknown reason there are some people that think software should be free. They see an installation CD and ask themselves; how much does this cost, 50 cents? Why does Microsoft charge so much?

Well here's the bottom line, if you can't afford the $100 for the OS, you can't afford the computer system.

I don't believe the idea here is that the software is free.. The idea is that everytime you upgrade your computer you shouldn't have to buy a new copy of the same software.

IE. Motherboard/CPU fry, you swap those out, should you have to pay ANOTHER 100$ because of this mishap?

If you buy an OEM lic and replace the MB/CPU, you don't need to buy a new OS. But that's not what the OP was asking.

Laptop OS is a "bundled" product and is licensed as such. When he bought the laptop he didn't pay for a transferrable OS. It's simple really, if you don't pay, you're stealing. Just look at China and the massive theft of intellectual property, then wonder why so many tech jobs have been lost in the USA.

When you pay for Windows just remember you're not buying the product, you're only paying to use it according to MS's terms and conditions.
October 9, 2006 4:07:34 PM

After reviewing the first message in this thread I'm wondering where you got "laptop" from. Replacing a mobo in a laptop is beyond most peoples comprehension and/or skills.

In the original post it "looks" like the OP is scrapping his VIAO but keeping the hard drive and he wants to keep the hard drive and the OS intact. Now if he scraps the sony, he now has no PC and if he builds a new computer he then has one PC. The XP license says you can have the OS installed on one PC, it doesn't say one "Sony PC" or one "OEM PC". The problem with OEM PC's is that they customize the "recovery" disk or OS disk to check for OEM hardware and set it up to load the specific drivers for the hardware the disk came with.

If you can get the OS to install on one PC there should be no legal reason why you can't have it on the one PC of your choice, no matter who made it. If you purchased an OEM PC that had an OS installed on it, then you own the license for that copy of the OS whether it was bundled or not.

Why do you think some systems are sold with no OS installed at a price quite a bit cheaper than the same PC with an OS installed.

An OEM piece of software or hardware usually means you don't get manuals or retail packaging with it.
October 9, 2006 4:54:55 PM

Quote:
After reviewing the first message in this thread I'm wondering where you got "laptop" from. Replacing a mobo in a laptop is beyond most peoples comprehension and/or skills.

In the original post it "looks" like the OP is scrapping his VIAO but keeping the hard drive and he wants to keep the hard drive and the OS intact. Now if he scraps the sony, he now has no PC and if he builds a new computer he then has one PC. The XP license says you can have the OS installed on one PC, it doesn't say one "Sony PC" or one "OEM PC". The problem with OEM PC's is that they customize the "recovery" disk or OS disk to check for OEM hardware and set it up to load the specific drivers for the hardware the disk came with.

If you can get the OS to install on one PC there should be no legal reason why you can't have it on the one PC of your choice, no matter who made it. If you purchased an OEM PC that had an OS installed on it, then you own the license for that copy of the OS whether it was bundled or not.

Why do you think some systems are sold with no OS installed at a price quite a bit cheaper than the same PC with an OS installed.

An OEM piece of software or hardware usually means you don't get manuals or retail packaging with it.


Your assumptions regarding specific OEM versions of Windows are incorrect. The Sony license, once activated, is not valid for use on another computer. If you buy an OEM version of Windows, with new hardware (such as a CPU or MOBO), then you're correct. If you doubt this, read the Sony lic agreement.

The laptop reference was a brain fart on my part because I have a VIAO laptop. However, the point regarding Sony OS lic agreement restrictions is the same for desktop or laptop. If you think about what Sony pays for bulk OS licenses vs. what you pay for an OEM or retail version, you can understand why MS restricts the use for bundled versions.
October 9, 2006 6:43:48 PM

It appears after some research that ultimately lead back to the microshaft site, that "legally" we are only allowed to install an operating system on one computer only, and if that computer dies...your "legal" OS dies with it and "legally" you must purchase another OS (complete...not an upgrade) when you build a replacement computer.

I'm glad we didn't have this problem with cars, but I guess we soon will now that microshaft is getting into our cars.

I guess it's time for me to start getting comfortable with linux. :evil: 
October 9, 2006 6:47:40 PM

That is indeed true for OEM copies but not for full copies, where you have a movable license but only one at a time. The concept behind OEM is that it is a discounted license for the original equipment only. Thats why it is cheaper than a full version, because it is more limited.
October 9, 2006 7:01:07 PM

The time for Linux has arived quite a while ago... it's just the game manufacturers that don't seem to agree.

Hey, Mircorsoft costs more and has restrictive licencing... it MUST be better, right?!?
!