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Core 2 Due = cant get better atm?

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October 7, 2006 9:52:25 PM

I've never built a intel system before and I havent really looked at the C2D stuff.
But since reading your recommendations I am now seriously thinking about getting C2D.
I have no idea where to begin however.
Can you recommend a sli mobo, processor and ram and maybe a video card.
I basically cant afford the top end stuff but i do want to get a mobo that has some upgrade potential for in about 2 years and a system to run todays latest games quite comfortably.
I was also thinking with the SLI i get 1 gfx card now and then get another card to go with it in a year or so, Keeping up with the new games that come out.

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October 7, 2006 11:23:33 PM

Thanks for the advice

Whats the best type of DDR2 memory to get with a C2D chip to get the most out of it?
October 8, 2006 12:20:21 AM

Don't worry too much about DDR2 memory for the C2D. Are you planning to overclock? If so, plan on memory that goes 1:1 with the FSB - CAS 5 timings are fine. I don't know how well Nvidia 775 chipsets overclock, but if you discover that people typically reach, say, 340MHz FSB with it, then you'll want memory that runs at 680MHz. Some DDR2-667 at CAS4 from a reputable manufacturer would be plenty yet economical - the slight headroom to 680MHz is there even at CAS4, let alone CAS5.

If you're not planning to overclock, then 266MHz is the stock FSB, and so any plain pair of DDR2-533 would do. I think they're all CAS 4 minimum.
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October 8, 2006 12:24:13 AM

Typically you'll want to get memory running at the same speed of the FSB. So if your FSB is running at 1066 MHz (266 MHz quad pumped) you wanna get DDR2/4200 memory (2 x 266 x 8) If you overclock the FSB to 333 MHz, you'll want to get DDR2/5300 memory.

Feel free to correct me here if I'm wrong here.
October 8, 2006 1:52:53 AM

Seriously?

DDR2-4200 = 533MHz
DDR2-5300 = 667MHz

So why would anyone want to get those?
October 8, 2006 5:19:22 PM

Quote:
I basically cant afford the top end stuff but i do want to get a mobo that has some upgrade potential for in about 2 years and a system to run todays latest games quite comfortably.
I was also thinking with the SLI i get 1 gfx card now and then get another card to go with it in a year or so, Keeping up with the new games that come out.


simply stated new generation card often match and alot of times out perform yesterdays SLI setup.

if you cant afford a SLI setup NOW, i wouldn't even worry it at all, what happens when next year a super affordable Crossfire setup becomes available. Opps yur stuck with SLI. never knowing where the market is going makes purchasing hard.

right now a mid range card $150-$200 will serve you quite well.

im not saying Crossfire is the way to go or SLI is the way to go, im saying for a budget minded person these types of settups are probably out of range, even though it may seem feasable to get card #2 of the setup next year - it's wasted cuz next years card is better than yur 2.

try saving money now on your settup by not buying a SLI motherboard. thats a few extra bones for next years card, or for a better card now. I've said this to a few other people, I run a geforce 6200, and it plays ALOT of new(er) games, and i would be willing to bet that if you got a 7600 or comperable ATI card that your gaming ability would last well into the end of next year, if you manage to save a few more dollars you may be able to get 1 up from that card, making you a little more future proof.

edit:
BTW do you know what yur budget is? it's helpful for reccomendations if we know a budget :) 
October 8, 2006 5:35:17 PM

Ok, I know that everyone always says this, but you might want to wait for DirectX 10 before investing too much in video cards. Of course, how much of a revolution it will actually be remains to be seen, but I think it's safe to say that all top-end video cards will be DirectX 10 in a year from now.
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