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Whats a good Temp Range?

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  • CPUs
  • Power Supplies
Last response: in CPUs
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October 10, 2006 3:05:16 AM

I have temp monitoring software, but it does not say what a good CPU and System Temp are.

(The photo example in the book reads 74 C CPU and 35 Case. I can't remember how to convert C to F, but I know that is absurdly hot.)

My CPU runs at about 50 C with the system at 40 C at a stand still. Goes up a maybe 5 tops for basic uses normally only 1 or 2.

I worry that the wires and junk from my power supply may interfere with airflow even with the fans I have.

(80mm front intake, 92mm CPU fan w/side output cone, 120mm Power Supply)
(Core 2 Duo 2.4Ghz with an ATI 256MB)

I thought about adding another 80mm fan to the back, but as it is I need to get some sound absorbers its so damn loud.

More about : whats good temp range

October 10, 2006 3:47:32 AM

As far as Core2 Duos are concerned, Intel states 60C max. Use the Core Temp app for measuring your CPU temp - some other software measures different sensors and so you get different (usually lower) results.
October 10, 2006 4:38:15 PM

How much lower does the software read?

I'm using CoreCenter (came with the MSI board).

It was a barebones kit (mobo, case, cpu fan, PSU, cpu) plus the 80mm fan I stuck on.
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October 10, 2006 6:52:17 PM

Quote:
As far as Core2 Duos are concerned, Intel states 60C max. Use the Core Temp app for measuring your CPU temp - some other software measures different sensors and so you get different (usually lower) results.


I think there is a misconception about the temperatures in the Core 2 CPUs. The famous "60C" value is a limit (among others) recommended for the design of the heatsink that you put over the CPU. i.e. the thermal solution that you use must target the thermal profile that Intel recommend.

The limit temperatures at the cores for normal operation is high that 60C. At aprox 85C the processor will throttle its frequency. The limit to the automatically shutdown is over 85C, probably between 90C-100C (maybe more).

So, there is nothing to worry about this "60C" limit.

- Davor
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
October 10, 2006 8:07:54 PM

Case temp is a bit high IMO, maybe you should look adding some fan if possible.

I agree with the actual limit being much higher than 60, but I think aiming for 60 is safe for stable proper operation with long CPU lifespan!

Your CPu shouldnt run this hot, try shaking the heatsink a little, if it does move or its shaky, that means it's improperly mounted. Look at the forum, there's at the very least 20 other thread with all sort of good explanation/movies and whatnot.

I suggest removing the motherboard all together, then remove the heatsink and reseat it. then you flip the motherboard to make sure all 4 pins are all the way thru!

if the thermal paste is all over the place you need to clean that with isopropyl alcohool and re-apply some Artic Silver 5 or I recommand this one: Zalman ZM-STG1
October 10, 2006 8:22:05 PM

Quote:
Case temp is a bit high IMO, maybe you should look adding some fan if possible.

I agree with the actual limit being much higher than 60, but I think aiming for 60 is safe for stable proper operation with long CPU lifespan!

Your CPu shouldnt run this hot, try shaking the heatsink a little, if it does move or its shaky, that means it's improperly mounted. Look at the forum, there's at the very least 20 other thread with all sort of good explanation/movies and whatnot.

I suggest removing the motherboard all together, then remove the heatsink and reseat it. then you flip the motherboard to make sure all 4 pins are all the way thru!

if the thermal paste is all over the place you need to clean that with isopropyl alcohool and re-apply some Artic Silver 5 or I recommand this one: Zalman ZM-STG1


According to Intel's specification manuals, a temperature below the throttle point is optimal and long-term reliable.

If you want to be sure, I think that probably a temperature below 70C (for peaks loads) is enough.

- Davor
October 10, 2006 9:02:20 PM

You might think about a 120mm fan on the side, and/or a 80mm out the top. These should drop the case temps and therefore let the cpu temp drop a bit. Even with a good heatsink/fan on the cpu, if the insie case temp gets too high, they won't do as good as they should.
October 10, 2006 9:30:58 PM

50C idle? Somethings wrong. You should be seeing 30s or something....

~Ibrahim~
October 10, 2006 9:44:16 PM

HA! I have a Thermaltake Silent Water for my Core 2 Duo and with EIST and C1E enabled, the CPU idles at 41C. Overclocked to 3.0GHz, with C1E and speedstep disabled, it idles at 50C. Without overclock, CPU tops out at 55C. Overclocked, it hits 60C, but never goes past that. My problem was that the waterpump and fan is blocking the heatsink that runs from the northbridge up towards the CPU since in the motherboard design, the CPU fan was suppose to help cool the NorthBridge. So, I had to make some adjustments so that I could add the top fan back in my P180B case to help cool it down. As of now, when I game, my motherboard temp reads around 50~53C at full load. *sighs* they should make more BTX motherboards!!! As well as cases!!!
October 10, 2006 10:09:05 PM

I worry about water coolers leaking. I've never used them. Wonder how the PC manufactures get around this stuff? Or maybe all the Dell Core 2 will die in a year or 2.

I'm not overclocking to get a range of 47 to 55C. (In fact its all stock stats) I've not even put the VGA card to its test with anything intensive.

(Heatsink and fan are fine.)

30C Holy Crap Batman. I'd have to use a bag of ice. I already have enough fans to make it sound like a plane. I guess another off the back can't hurt.

I don't want to over do it and stuff the case to full for air flow. The CPU fan is an Ultra Fire 92mm meant for a P4 at 3.8 GHz, but it does get a little in the way of the 120mm PSU fan.

(I wanted to build it myself, but I wish I came a guarantee.)
October 10, 2006 10:36:52 PM

About the leaking. That's why I got the thermaltake because the water tank is made out of copper and not cheap plastic. The only places I can see it leaking is through the tubing, but there's no kinks or sharp objects within the case that would cut through or cause the tubing the sporadically leak.

I'm very pleased with it, however, it's sad that ASUS didn't design a better way to cool the NB and SB. The whole heatpipe is useless when the entire water cooling unit is hooked to the back of the case.

I got two 40mm fans for the NB and SB, but they don't seem to help either :( 
October 10, 2006 10:52:47 PM

Wow.....And here I was thinking C2D ran cooler than AMDs..

~Ibrahim~
October 10, 2006 11:20:14 PM

yea, I thought so too until I realized that ASUS Probe is crap. I tried the CoreTemp on my AMD machine. HA!!! Seems like they run about the same temp! -.-
October 10, 2006 11:53:12 PM

but arnt you comparing these machines to super overclocked machines? Is yours even overclocked to somewhat near as stressful as them?
October 11, 2006 12:45:50 AM

I was referring to stock speeds ;) 
!