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On Power on, Nothing happens..please help!

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Last response: in Systems
October 10, 2006 5:07:28 AM

My configuration is the following:

Intel Core 2 Duo - E6600 2.4Ghz
GIGABYTE GA-965P-DS3 Socket T (LGA 775) Intel P965 Express ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
Enhance ENP-5150GH 500W ATX12V Rev.2.2 (24/20+8/4+6), 80+ RoHS, Quiet PSU
Patriot Signature Series 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 667 (PC2 5300) Dual Channel Kit System Memory Model PSD22G667K - Retail
SAPPHIRE 100168L Radeon X1900XT 256MB 256-bit GDDR3 VIVO PCI Express x16 CrossFire Video Card - Retail
Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 300GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - Retail
NEC 16X DVD±R DVD Burner Black IDE/ATAPI Model ND-3550A - OEM
COOLER MASTER Centurion 5 CAC-T05-WW Black/Silver Aluminum Bezel, SECC Chassis ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail
Hanns·G HC-194D Black 19" 8ms LCD Monitor 250 cd/m2 700:1 Built in Speakers 0.294mm Pixel Pitch - Retail
Saitek PK02U 2-Tone 104 Normal Keys USB Standard Eclipse II Keyboard - Retail
Artic Silver 5

I started building my system today.

First, I attached the PSU to the case, then mounted the processor and heatsink with 2 RAM sticks in dual channel configuration mode. Then I mounted the motherboard into the Case on the standoffs. Attached the 20 pin and 4 pin power connectors and added the graphics card to PCI-E slot. Connected the PCI-E power connector to the graphics card and then connected Power/HDD LEDs and other such connections.

Then I tried to power up the system. The blue power LED of the Centurion lights up for split second and then there is nothing. If I disconnect the PSU from the mains and attach it again and power up, the same thing repeats. No fans spin, no other response from the system.

Am I doing something wrong here? I could use some help now. I feel as if my $1.4k has gone down the drain and feel very dissappointed...can someone please help..?

Sorry for the long post.

Let me know if anyone needs more information.

More about : power

October 10, 2006 5:57:43 AM

PRINT THIS AND FOLLOW STEP BY STEP

use only one piece of ram in single channel (look in your book for which slot is dimm1 and make sure it says that on the motherboard in really small print too)

disconnect all power except that to your motherboard and video card/pcie slot

remove all the cables from the motherboard except the power cable (this means no sata etc cables connected to the motherboard)--of course leave the power SW attached the the mainboard though, but disconnect the rest

try to power on, does the cpu fan spin?

yes...connect everything else one by one

no, follow on:

did you hear any beeps, if so post here

remove the video card and the power with it

remove the cpu fan, and the cpu from the socket.

review the cpu installation guide provided, make sure u installed it with the triangle (arrow) matching up with the socket and cpu.

reinstall the cpu fan (no need yet to put the whole artic cooling and what not on there, we just want to get it to spin then we'll worry about all that.

(so you should have cpu and memory only, nothing else...with just this if the mb is working the fan will spin)

if it STILL doesn't spin then you have bad PSU( THE MOST LIKELY PROBLEM...should have probably mentioned this from the start but its good to go through what i said first), memory, bad board, or a bad cpu.

i would test replacements in that order.

good luck
October 10, 2006 5:58:31 AM

p.s. disconnect anything connected to the back, including but not limited to keyboard and mouse.
Related resources
October 10, 2006 2:05:56 PM

Thanks Shaba, I will try the steps you have outlined after I come back from office tonight, and let you know about the outcome.

One question...Is there any way to test the PSU without attaching any other components...I mean, test it independently..like just by connecting to the mains...If I do so...shouldn't the PSU fan spin?
October 10, 2006 2:20:20 PM

sure is, gota get a circut checker or voltmeter though...you could probably pick up a cheap 3 dollar one at your local walmart/bs type store that will just tell you if it is outputting anything at all, but it wont actually tell you if it's outputting the right voltage..for that you would need a voltmeter(a bit more expensive) + some little extras.

and no, the psu will not spin until the motherboard has told it to turn on, and the motherboard can only tell it to turn on if it receives the communication from the power switch on your case. so for this to occur u need a working motherboard and a properly connected switch, along with a working cpu and *possibly* working memory (depending on your MB) installed (for the motherboard to even want to turn on)

speaking of.....check that first, make sure you put the power switch leads it in the right spot on the MB...that might be the nice easy fix :) 
October 10, 2006 2:23:32 PM

Yea, I'll check the PSU first thing tonight..

I hope everything goes well..fingers crossed...
October 10, 2006 2:45:31 PM

Quote:


speaking of.....check that first, make sure you put the power switch leads it in the right spot on the MB...that might be the nice easy fix :) 


Okay, on reading this, a silly question popped into my mind...
Is there a +ve/-ve leads for the power switch connection...since the power switch conncetor on the case has no such markings....
October 10, 2006 4:49:27 PM

Do you mean the PW SW connector from the case to the motherboard?

Yes, that switched aroud can cause this problem. Make sure you've got it on right...With mine, I just did trial and error 'til it turned on, lol..

~Ibrahim~
October 10, 2006 7:20:16 PM

Quote:
Do you mean the PW SW connector from the case to the motherboard?


Yes, I did.

Quote:
Yes, that switched aroud can cause this problem. Make sure you've got it on right...With mine, I just did trial and error 'til it turned on, lol..
~Ibrahim~


I really hope this is the case.

Since the power LED turns on for an instant when powering on..what else could be wrong?

Thanks for all your replies. I really appretiate them.
October 10, 2006 8:08:21 PM

Gotta say some type of connection problem...It's the most common problem.

All your parts look compatible. Have you tried booting with just one memory stick?

Have you tried Shaba's steps as if yet?

~Ibrahim~
October 10, 2006 8:14:20 PM

Quote:
Gotta say some type of connection problem...It's the most common problem.

All your parts look compatible. Have you tried booting with just one memory stick?

Have you tried Shaba's steps as if yet?

~Ibrahim~


No, I haven't. I am at office right now. But, as soonas I get home, I will get to it and try different combinations for the case connectors to the motherboard and then if that doesn't work. I will follow it up with Shaba's steps i.e. booting with one RAM stick and keeping my ears on the PC speaker..
a b B Homebuilt system
October 10, 2006 8:34:48 PM

Quote:
Attached the 20 pin and 4 pin power connectors and added the graphics card to PCI-E slot. Connected the PCI-E power connector to the graphics card and then connected Power/HDD LEDs and other such connections.


You didn't mention whether or not you connected the additional 4-pin plug for the CPU at the top of the board. Just a shot in the dark... could be that easy. Also, you can bridge the power switch pins with a screwdriver to test for a faulty case switch.

You may have to recheck the motherboard standoffs and ensure that none are grounding on the back of the motherboard. Let us know when you get home and do a some of the suggested diagnostics.
October 10, 2006 9:00:18 PM

When I mentioned that I had connected the 4 pin power connector, I meant the CPU power connector.

Gigabyte-965P-DS3 has a 24 pin power connector on it and an additional 4 pin for the CPU. Whereas the PSU has a 20+4 pin combination. So I conneccted the 20 pin PSU cable to the 24 pin connector leaving the pins 11.12 23 and 24 empty and connected the 4 pin cable to a connector near the CPU on the m/b.

What do you exactly mean by, "You may have to recheck the motherboard standoffs and ensure that none are grounding on the back of the motherboard."? Do you want to say that the standoffs must not touch the motherboard. If this is the case, then how am I supposed to mount the m/b into he case? I thought that the m/b was to be mounted on stand-offs screwed into the case and then the m/b was held on the standoffs using screws that go into the threads of the standoffs themseleves.
October 10, 2006 9:10:38 PM

I think I found your problem.

You've got 24-pin, 20+4 Pin, and P4 4-Pin confused. That motherboard requires a total of "28" pins connected. Connect all 24 pins to those 2 rows of 12. Then, on the PSU, there is ANOTHER 4 Pin connector, completely detached from those 24, and that gets connected to the connector near the CPU. Do you get me?

~Ibrahim~
October 10, 2006 9:16:16 PM

Eek! I screwed that one...

Gotcha Ibrahim, thanks a lot :) 
October 10, 2006 9:19:29 PM

Knew it had to be a connection problem. Good luck and have fun with that BEAST!

~Ibrahim~
a b B Homebuilt system
October 10, 2006 9:29:31 PM

Quote:
Eek! I screwed that one...

Gotcha Ibrahim, thanks a lot :) 


Hey, I need some credit here too! :lol:  I was getting to that in my last POST!

Anyway, plug in your 20-pin+4-pin into the mobo power and plug in the 4-pin CPU power.

[/high_five_ikjadoon]
October 10, 2006 10:03:07 PM

Nice to see such helpfull posts.

It is good that someone thought to ask how many pins were (un)used (I was going to suggest checking that before I saw the 2nd last post). I had a similar issue when I forgot to attach a 4-pin P4 connector once.

It's pretty common for PSU's to die, so if nothing powers up (after swapping the PSU for the right type), check your PSU (if you have access to a PSU tester), then check your motherboard for blown/leaking/bloated capacitors.

Hope it works!
October 10, 2006 10:10:59 PM

Quote:
Eek! I screwed that one...

Gotcha Ibrahim, thanks a lot :) 


Hey, I need some credit here too! :lol:  I was getting to that in my last POST!

Anyway, plug in your 20-pin+4-pin into the mobo power and plug in the 4-pin CPU power.

[/high_five_ikjadoon]

Okay, I owe you my thanks too, if this works :) 
I am feeling very very excited..can't wait to get home...
October 10, 2006 10:57:30 PM

In reality, everyone in the thread should be thanked. I got lucky, but pritchett was getting there, all good suggestions.

~Ibrahim~

[/return_high_five]
a b B Homebuilt system
October 10, 2006 11:01:31 PM

Quote:
In reality, everyone in the thread should be thanked. I got lucky, but pritchett was getting there, all good suggestions.


But if he plugs everything in and his computer blows up then its ikjadoon's fault :p 
October 10, 2006 11:44:06 PM

Okay, I'm at home now...

The 20+4 pin cable doent seem to fit securely into the motherboard. The problem is the plastic protusions at the ends of the 20 pin and 4 pin connectors do not allow me to connect thse securely. This is probably because I split the 4 pin part out to connect to the CPU power. Now I dont know what should be the correct orientation of the 4 pin part of the 20+4 pin connector.

Also about the separate 4 pin power connector for the CPU, I found 2 4 piin connectors on the PSU attached together. The wires are color coded as yelloe and black i.e 2 yellow and 2 blacks..DoI use one of these as the CPU connector?

I tried connecting assuming the above and trying to fit the 4 pin part of 20+4 pin in the only way it can go and I saw a brief red LED glow on my gfx card and power LED glowed for the same amount of time. But no fans were spinning...am I still on the right track?

Awaiting your replies till I proceed further

Thanks again to all ofyou.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 10, 2006 11:54:29 PM

The separate power connector that has two 4-pin cables is for your CPU. Some motherboards have a 4-pin plugin, some have a 8-pin plugin (I use the 8-pin plugin). It's split up to be a universal connector kind of like the 20-pin plus 4-pin main power connector instead of having just a 24-pin connector. I don't think it matters which one you use on the 4-pin connector on the board, but I could be mistaken. It should be keyed so you can't plug in one of them if that's not the case.

If your computer still doesn't start and you are certain that you have the right plugs going where they need to go then you need to follow the original advice in this thread to troubleshoot why it won't boot.


EDIT: I just look at the manual for my motherboard (with an 8-pin CPU power connector) and it does look like they ARE keyed differently. So, you need to find the 4-pin connector that matches the key of the motherboard plugin for CPU power.
October 11, 2006 12:09:06 AM

Phew! okay...the system powered up...

Just one quetion before I stumble on my next hurdle :p 
On powering up the CPU fan lies idle for about 2-3 seconds..then starts spinning after the 1st beep...is this normal?

I always thought that CPU fan started running almost immediately as the system was powered up...

Now I'll connect my LCD and see if everything is fine so far...then proceed with IDE/SATA connections..
a b B Homebuilt system
October 11, 2006 12:18:00 AM

WooHoo! Don't you love it when it powers on for the first time? You feel like Dr. Frankenstein: "It's Alive, ALIVE!!!"

Back to your question about the CPU fan, it really should start up when the board powers up. I'm not familiar with Gigabyte motherboards, though. See if it continues to do this after you update the BIOS, maybe they've fixed it by now. Anyone else know if it's not supposed to do this?
October 11, 2006 4:24:21 AM

I've never seen the CPU fan NOT spin before the POST (power on self test) completes. Some boards support fan speed management that is designed to keep fan speeds low (reduces noise), but I've only seen it activate after the post (spin fast until post, then slow down).

Check the BIOS settings and see if the fan speed management/monitoring settings may be causing this (example: less than ## degrees = 0 rpm, etc), read that user manual cover to cover at least once, especially the BIOS configuration section(s).

If in doubt, you can watch the idle temps (if your BIOS displays them) and if the CPU temp gets too high look into it further (should idle under 50C I think, but I'm NOT certain). Intel CPU's are pretty good at saving themselves from thermal death so you should be safe (had a 2.8 GHz P4 heatsink fall right off, during a 40C heatwave (that's over a 100F for you other folks), was rebooted 6 times, and NO damage).

[Warning: Useless "computer geek" notes past here]

Those odd connectors:
-2black+2yellow = 12 volt CPU plug ("P4" connector)
-3black+3yellow = 12 volt GPU plug (PCIe or GPU connector)
-mix of colors (4 pin) = Motherboard power for "20+4" pin connector
**4-pin plugs are built (keyed) to only fit one port, not both, so very hard to mix up (not like the 'old' days)

Wire Colors:
red = 5 volts
yellow = 12 volts
orange = 3.3 volts (I think; found in SATA power connectors)
black = ground
October 11, 2006 4:50:37 AM

I have completed my build.. Just a few odd things remaining...front USB and audio conncetions and the like...

I would like to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who has helped me.
You guys are great!

I will report abck tomorrow with the latest system status.
Thanks again..

*Runs off to install drivers and important stff..a.k.a. GAMES...wheee...

Cheers!
October 11, 2006 8:01:47 PM

That is a little odd. Mine gives maybe a 2/3 of a second or something before the CPU fan kicks in...It is not right when I press it, there is a delay. Not as long 2-3 seconds. Should be OK, though.

Excellent, I'm glad it is up and running.

~Ibrahim~
October 11, 2006 8:30:22 PM

Okay...my CPU temp hovers around 47 to 49 deg C. And thats with downloads going on using Azereus.
Stays about 44 deg C idle. Is this ok?

I am really confused about the 2-3 sec delay in CPU fan starting up when the comp is cold booted...let me see if I can figure something out tonight.

The idle temps of X1900XT is around 57 deg C. Not tested when playing games yet (was about 77 deg C when I quit Oblivion)...they were running too smooth for me to be noticing anything else :p ...but oh well, I'll check that tonight too. I also plan to tweak its fan settings so that its core temp goes down.

Next up is the BIOS update to F6 from F4...or should I wait for F7 thats coming sometime next week as per Anandtech?

Edit: Fixed Spellings...silly me..
a b B Homebuilt system
October 11, 2006 8:39:16 PM

Go ahead and update your BIOS to F6 and then go to F7 when it's released. Maybe that will solve the fan issue.

A couple seconds at startup without the fan running probably isn't going to hurt anything since heat is still being transferred to the heatsink. You get into trouble when the heatsink takes in all the heat it can and without a fan spinning to take the heat off. I'm sure the fan kicks in before the heatsink hits that critical level.
October 11, 2006 10:26:31 PM

47ish sounds good for a C2D setup...

~Ibrahim~
October 12, 2006 3:50:25 PM

I ran a series of benchmarks and tests last night...

CPU temp is a worry for me...(measured using Intel Thermal analysis Tool)
The idle temp is about 55 deg C
At 100% load it shoots to 74 deg C
Same temps reported when running Prime95 bench - 8K FFT and 1024K FFT.
Re-verified the Temps using Core Temp utility 0.9.1


Used the Free version of 3DMark 2006 and got a score of 5480.
GPU seems to be working fine withing normal parameters...

What could be the reason for the abnormal CPU temp? I am wondering whether I put on too much thermal paste...

Any thoughts?
a b B Homebuilt system
October 12, 2006 4:02:16 PM

Are you using the stock HSF? The Intel stock fan is notoriously tricky to seat correctly.

What thermal compound are you using? AS5? Stock? Ceramique? Also, how did you apply it and what did you use to clean the surfaces?

What is your motherboard/case temperature?

Do you have the CPU fan or chassis fans throttled down with monitoring software? What is the RPM of your CPU fan?

Are you running the CPU at stock speeds or OC?
October 12, 2006 4:25:11 PM

Forgot to mention one thing...I updated the BIOS to F6.

Quote:
Are you using the stock HSF?

Yes, I am.

Quote:
What thermal compound are you using? AS5? Stock? Ceramique? Also, how did you apply it and what did you use to clean the surfaces?

Thermal compound: Artic Silver 5
Application technique: Scrape the heatpads off the stock Heatsink contact metal surface. Shine it with a piece of paper. Mount the CPU into the socket and close the latch. Take the tube of AS5 and put a small drop on the exposed surface of the CPU seated. Spread the paste evenly on the exposed surface of the CPU sticking out of the socket using a credit card sized sheet. Place the heatsink on the CPU and make sure its secured firmly.

Quote:
What is your motherboard/case temperature?

Motherboard temp is about 43 to 45 deg C. No case temp yet as I have not yet closed the case.

Quote:
Do you have the CPU fan or chassis fans throttled down with monitoring software?

Not as per my knowledge.

Quote:
What is the RPM of your CPU fan?

On boot the rpm is about 1200, when running at about 50 to 75% load its about 1700 rpm.

Quote:
Are you running the CPU at stock speeds or OC?

Stock speeds ...no OC at all..too afraid to try OC with CPU at these temps.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 12, 2006 5:57:54 PM

-Try cleaning your heatsink and CPU with isopropyl alcohol (70% or better) just to make sure there is no foreign contamination and reseat your HSF.

-Use AS5's new instructions that just came out for dual core Intels: Arctic Silver 5 Intel Dual Core Instructions

The new instructions have you lay a bead of paste parallel with the elongated cores underneath.

I used AS5 but I did a hybrid technique using the AS5 and Ceramique instructions. They are the same except Ceramique has you rub the paste into the heatsink to fill microscopic valleys.

Your motherboard temps seem very high. What kind of air flow do you have in your case? Intake fan, exhaust fan? 80mm, 120mm? According to thermodynamics, the CPU will never be below the ambient temperature, and your motherboard temp is higher than what the CPU should be at idle.

Also, when you take off your HSF, make note of the pattern left on the paste. I found that my stock HSF was slightly concave by checking the pattern in the paste so I bought an aftermarket HSF.
October 12, 2006 9:28:02 PM

I am using Coolermaster Centurion with 2 fans:
120 mm rear exhaust fan
80 mm front intake fan
The PSU has 120 mm fan at the bottom.

All temps were measured with Case cover open.
I think, I may have to reseat the Heatsink as you have suggested using the AS5 instruction manual..

Could you please let me know the ideal m/b temp, that I should be seeing?
Note that the m/b temps are as reported using the Easytune 5 utility. Is it reliable when it comes to temp? Could the CPU temp push the ambient m/b temp up?

Edit: Added the PSU fan info.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 12, 2006 11:56:23 PM

When I first set up my system (in a Coolermaster case too) with the stock HSF and paste, my CPU was at 48C idle and up to 62C on load. I applied AS5 (spread method like you) and reseated the stock HSF and got 45C idle. When I pulled the heatsink off, that's when I noticed from the pattern on the thermal paste that the HSF was only touching around the perimeter of the CPU (something's not flush... concave). I bought an aftermarket HSF and installed it with AS5. It idles at 36-40C now and gets up to 50-55C on load. My mobo temp is usually 33-38C.
October 13, 2006 4:32:49 AM

Okay the heatsink is getting reseated 1st thing on Saturday. I hope this is the end of the issue...if not, then I'll probably have to look into a new heatsink like Zalman CNP or Scythe Infinity.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 13, 2006 5:18:08 PM

There are a few posts on here about people "lapping" the HSF contact surface to make it sit flush. Also, a lot of people recommend taking the mobo out after installing the HSF to look on the back to see if the HSF pins are really in place. If you decide to go aftermarket, a lot of people are recommending the ARCTIC COOLING Freezer 7 Pro because its relatively cheap and works like an ice cube.

Post back here when you reseat the HSF and let us know how your temps look.
October 13, 2006 5:37:47 PM

Thanks for the follow up rwpritchett!

Yea, I will post those temps on this Sat afternoon sometime.
If that didnt work as intended i.e. resulted in core temp drop to 40s, then I might take a serious look at the cooler you have suggested.
October 13, 2006 8:40:34 PM

Arctic Cooling makes the best coolers for price vs. performance vs. noise.

~Ibrahim~
October 14, 2006 2:16:20 AM

i have the same problem with my computer. Only thing is i dont have another 4 pin connector to plug into the mobo power (pins 20-24). Do i need a certain power supply to do this?
October 14, 2006 1:37:04 PM

There are adapters, but they don't do anything really.

Yeah, it really needs a new PSU.

Sometimes it'll boot with only 20-pins plugged in, but...

~Ibrahim~
October 19, 2006 8:29:23 PM

I think I know where my temp problem has spawned from, I have a concave Heatsink. It bottom is very slightly concave in shape which it preventing it from making proper contact with the heatspreader on the CPU.

There is a lot of discussion about this on the Xtremesystems forums too. It seems that a lot of stock HSFs are either concave or even convex in shape. People are even considering sending their processor back to get one with a proper flat bottomed Heatsink.

Anyways I'll try "lapping" the surface and reseating it again and see if that makes any difference. Other thing to try would be sanding the heatsink, making sure its flat. But I'm not sure whether I'm upto that. If anyone is experienced in that, I could use your advice.

If not, I am ordering a new heatsink.
October 19, 2006 8:49:22 PM

There are some lapping guides. I've never bothered.

Here's one

Good luck!

~Ibrahim~
a b B Homebuilt system
October 19, 2006 8:52:55 PM

Yes, it does seem to be a common occurance to find the stock Intel HSF concave. I automatically assumed it was the HSF that was concave in my case, but I guess the CPU heatspreader could have been the problem. There are a few posts about concave CPU's here as well.

Let us know how the lapping works for you if you try it.