Scanhancer any good? Canon FS4000US

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

Anyone used scanhancer and is it any good? I have a Canon FS4000US but when
enlarging my scans of negs and slides they always look grainy (at 4000dpi).
I also wondered about the merits of using Vuescan or Silverfast instead of
Filmget. Any advice or tips appreciated. I want to get the most detail from
my film with minimum grain effect.
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More about scanhancer good canon fs4000us
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

    You are probably aware of all this: if an image is grainy then scanning at
    4000dpi will yield an excellent scan of the grain pattern. Unless you have a
    specific need for a scan that large you may want to consider limiting scan
    size to 2400 dpi. There are a number of photshop plug-ins that will reduce
    the apparent graininess of an image, and their are techniques to do it
    manually. One reason for being wary about large scan sizes, and even using
    48 bit color, is that eventually most of the data will have to be stripped
    out anyway for image manipulation and this will be done in an arbitrary
    fashion by a program, like your printer driver, over which you really have
    no control anyway. Even 48 bit color has its caveats: the color gamut can be
    so much wider than the printer's that you introduce an unintended artifact
    when the image is converted for 8 bit/300 dpi printing.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

    In article <vMRBc.17$785.16@newsfe3-gui>, John <zfriskney@zntlworld.com>
    writes
    >Anyone used scanhancer and is it any good? I have a Canon FS4000US but when
    >enlarging my scans of negs and slides they always look grainy (at 4000dpi).
    >I also wondered about the merits of using Vuescan or Silverfast instead of
    >Filmget. Any advice or tips appreciated. I want to get the most detail from
    >my film with minimum grain effect.
    >
    Scanhancer works, so well in fact that Minolta have adopted it as an
    integral feature in their flagship scanner. However, it does increase
    the scan time significantly because it scatters a lot of the light.
    --
    Kennedy
    Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
    A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's pissed.
    Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

    In article <C1YBc.7375$LJ.929@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com>, bmoag
    <aetoo@yahoo.com> writes
    >You are probably aware of all this: if an image is grainy then scanning at
    >4000dpi will yield an excellent scan of the grain pattern. Unless you have a
    >specific need for a scan that large you may want to consider limiting scan
    >size to 2400 dpi.

    NO! Scanning at a lower resolution will usually make the grain aliasing
    worse, depending on the algorithm used by the scan driver. See the
    discussion on this topic recently in comp.periphs.scanners under the
    thread "Elitechrome 100 Slide Scanning with Coolscan V ED" for an
    explanation of why this makes the situation worse.

    The *correct* way to do this is to scan at the full optical resolution
    (4000ppi in the case of the FS-4000) and then downsample in one of the
    better implementations such as Photoshop using bicubic interpolation.
    Alternatively, filter the image with an appropriate blur radius (half
    the ratio of original and final resolutions) and then downsample in a
    non-filtering application.
    --
    Kennedy
    Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
    A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's pissed.
    Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
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