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Saving an Internet Explorer STATIC Web Page

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  • Internet Explorer
  • Internet Connection
  • Windows XP
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Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:15:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I often want to save an IE file web page (my bank statement, a woodworking
plan, etc). I have tried web page complete, single file, edit with
Microsoft Word (when it is an option--not always!!) then save the resulting
file. Each works SOMETIMES. I have to switch my internet connection off
and try to load the saved file to even see if it worked. Sometimes NONE of
the approaches work.

I have read the explanations for this on line, but if I have been able to
display the page, why can't it just be essentially PRINTED to a file. It
would seem that I could probably save it to Adobe Acrobat. I don't care for
saving sound or antimation, just the STATIC PAGE!!!!

Why doesn't IE just do what Acrobat does--save the image that exists in
memory or can be assembled while it is on line. This is C**P. Can you
imagine the frustration of trying to view a bank statement of 8 to 12 months
ago and finding that you can't because the bank does not have the web page
anymore and all the damn links are gone? Printing all the stuff is counter
to the whole idea of having them send you the statement electronically.

More about : saving internet explorer static web page

Anonymous
November 26, 2004 3:19:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Eric Anderson" wrote:

> I often want to save an IE file web page (my bank statement, a woodworking
> plan, etc). I have tried web page complete, single file, edit with
> Microsoft Word (when it is an option--not always!!) then save the resulting
> file. Each works SOMETIMES. I have to switch my internet connection off
> and try to load the saved file to even see if it worked. Sometimes NONE of
> the approaches work.
>
> I have read the explanations for this on line, but if I have been able to
> display the page, why can't it just be essentially PRINTED to a file. It
> would seem that I could probably save it to Adobe Acrobat. I don't care for
> saving sound or antimation, just the STATIC PAGE!!!!
>
> Why doesn't IE just do what Acrobat does--save the image that exists in
> memory or can be assembled while it is on line. This is C**P. Can you
> imagine the frustration of trying to view a bank statement of 8 to 12 months
> ago and finding that you can't because the bank does not have the web page
> anymore and all the damn links are gone? Printing all the stuff is counter
> to the whole idea of having them send you the statement electronically.
>
>
>
Print to File
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 5:52:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Eric Anderson" <eganders@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:EqGdnfSz1YpipDrcRVn-rQ@comcast.com...
>I often want to save an IE file web page (my bank statement, a
>woodworking
> plan, etc). I have tried web page complete, single file, edit with
> Microsoft Word (when it is an option--not always!!) then save the
> resulting
> file. Each works SOMETIMES. I have to switch my internet connection
> off
> and try to load the saved file to even see if it worked. Sometimes
> NONE of
> the approaches work.
>
> I have read the explanations for this on line, but if I have been able
> to
> display the page, why can't it just be essentially PRINTED to a file.
> It
> would seem that I could probably save it to Adobe Acrobat. I don't
> care for
> saving sound or antimation, just the STATIC PAGE!!!!
>
> Why doesn't IE just do what Acrobat does--save the image that exists
> in
> memory or can be assembled while it is on line. This is C**P. Can
> you
> imagine the frustration of trying to view a bank statement of 8 to 12
> months
> ago and finding that you can't because the bank does not have the web
> page
> anymore and all the damn links are gone? Printing all the stuff is
> counter
> to the whole idea of having them send you the statement
> electronically.
>
>


When you attempt to *save* the page, the browser is going to *try* to
yank all the components that were included in that page, some of which
is text, some of which might be linked images to files that contain
those images, and some might be *generated* content which never does
exist in the STATIC web page but gets created when you visit that page
(and that page may not even exist on their server any might get
completed generated on-the-fly and that content sent to your browser).
If the web site is using a script or program to generate content
on-the-fly then that content won't be available when the browser simply
attempts to yank all the components on that page. IE saving a web page
will attempt to yank the components from that page. I'm sure you have
noticed the download dialog window that pops up when you attempt to save
a web page. Saving the web page does NOT store the *rendered* version
of that page as you see it at a specific time under certain conditions.
You might have IE in a small-sized window, or expanded to display
fullscreen, or you might be navigating to the site from some other site
that leaves its frame in that browser's window so the next site or page
only gets to use a portion of the browser's window.

If you want to save the web page, that means you want to yank the
components of that web page and THAT is what you are attempting to save.
Not all components can be yanked, especially if they are generated by a
script or program. If you want to save exactly what you see on your
screen in the current instance of the browser's window as it got
rendered under THAT environment then get a screen capture program.

There is no such thing as a STATIC page when IE is rendering the HTML
code in that web page. Text might be centered but obviously centering
depends on how wide is the viewing area for the HTML document. Lots of
positioning depends on the viewing area and its dimensions. If you
actually could save a static copy when your browser window occupied half
the size of the screen then looking at it in a browser window that was
fullscreen would still only occupy half of the screen (minus the space
that was occupied by the browser's toolbars). A table that uses fixed
width columns would scroll off to the right of your browser's current
window size. You can scroll over to see the rest but not if you only
saved a static copy of exactly what you saw in the browser's window
before scrolling (and all you would see if you did scroll over would be
that half of the page when you view it later).

The HTML document is full of code and THAT is what you are attempting to
save. If some of that content is generated on-the-fly then it might not
be available when you try to yank it. And any server-side programs that
are used by the page will not get downloaded when you save the page
(i.e., you do not get to save a copy of their program). If you truly
want a STATIC copy of exactly what you see on the screen, get a screen
capture utility.

--
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Anonymous
November 26, 2004 11:00:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

This appears elegantly simple!

The last time I printed a prn file, I was using DOS. Excuse the ignorance,
but how can I retrieve the content (i.e. print it or view it). I tried to
drop it on the printer and it wants me to open it in an application.




"Chuck Davis" <ChuckDavis@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:BA5AA401-1EAE-46E7-86B9-E41DB6BFF0F8@microsoft.com...
>> >
> >
> >
> Print to File
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 1:00:24 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I understand what you are trying to say. Let me try to explain what I think
should happen by answering your comments. Obviously, what I believe does
not matter a hill of beans, but I think that when I SAVE something, I should
have total control of it after that time. If someone wants to remove it
from their site, I have SAVED it so I can recover it whenever I want to.
What good is saving something if it isn't saved (in total). I respond to
your specific comments below. I do understand what you are saying, and I
would like your take on my comments.

"_Vanguard_" <see.signature@email.without.passcode.is.invalid> wrote in
message news:ec#zRn$0EHA.1408@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>
> When you attempt to *save* the page, the browser is going to *try* to
> yank all the components that were included in that page, some of which
> is text, some of which might be linked images to files that contain
> those images, and some might be *generated* content which never does
> exist in the STATIC web page but gets created when you visit that page
> (and that page may not even exist on their server any might get
> completed generated on-the-fly and that content sent to your browser).

On a computer, everything is generated in some way. A Word file is
assembled by the Microsoft Word application in memory. When a person saves
a web page, which is more important--being able to recreate the static view
being displayed on the screen or (at the whim of a remote server still
having the content) being able to recreate the exact dynamic presentation
that existed before? I THINK that is what we are talking about here. What
is the usefulness of saving a web page over saving a favorite that allows
you to point to the page where the original page was generated.

> If the web site is using a script or program to generate content
> on-the-fly then that content won't be available when the browser simply
> attempts to yank all the components on that page. IE saving a web page
> will attempt to yank the components from that page. I'm sure you have
> noticed the download dialog window that pops up when you attempt to save
> a web page. Saving the web page does NOT store the *rendered* version
> of that page as you see it at a specific time under certain conditions.

I hear you, but I think THAT is what I want. When I try to save a page, I
am trying to save the content I see on the screen at that time. I am not
trying to save the entire ability of pulling up records from a remote server
which might occupy Terabytes. I want to save a plan on how to build a
woodworking project. I am trying to save a monthly statement (so I can
refer to it a year later). I am trying to save a newspaper story (which may
be removed by the publisher) to refer to it later. If I want to search a
database or work with dynamic information that the server on line can
provide me, I will choose a favorite and link to the website itself.

> You might have IE in a small-sized window, or expanded to display
> fullscreen, or you might be navigating to the site from some other site
> that leaves its frame in that browser's window so the next site or page
> only gets to use a portion of the browser's window.
>
If I am reading you correctly, I could have Word in a small window, that
does not mean that the Word file I save is not able to be totally
regenerated when I open Word again and go full screen. Again, I am not
expecting a dynamic window. I just want the equivalent of my Word file back
again. Hell, many times the picture content exists in saving the website
complete, they are just not displayed for some reason.

> If you want to save the web page, that means you want to yank the
> components of that web page and THAT is what you are attempting to save.

Yes.

> Not all components can be yanked, especially if they are generated by a
> script or program. If you want to save exactly what you see on your
> screen in the current instance of the browser's window as it got
> rendered under THAT environment then get a screen capture program.

They can be yanked at the time you are saving them because they are yanked
to be displayed on your screen. I don't want a screen capture program
because the page may be several screens long. I just want to save what I am
seeing.
>
> There is no such thing as a STATIC page when IE is rendering the HTML
> code in that web page. Text might be centered but obviously centering
> depends on how wide is the viewing area for the HTML document. Lots of
> positioning depends on the viewing area and its dimensions. If you
> actually could save a static copy when your browser window occupied half
> the size of the screen then looking at it in a browser window that was
> fullscreen would still only occupy half of the screen (minus the space
> that was occupied by the browser's toolbars). A table that uses fixed
> width columns would scroll off to the right of your browser's current
> window size. You can scroll over to see the rest but not if you only
> saved a static copy of exactly what you saw in the browser's window
> before scrolling (and all you would see if you did scroll over would be
> that half of the page when you view it later).
>
Mmmm. If I were to choose, I would ask the SAVE operation to save it so I
could render it so I could scroll just as I would when I was looking at the
data on my screen originally. I would not ask it to render new data or data
that was up to date at the time I retrieved the saved file.

Chuck said simply--print to file. I guess that is what I want. Stupid
me--I need to understand how to retrieve the damn thing after I do that.
But I guess that is what I want. An Adobe Acrobat print to file would do
the trick for me.

> The HTML document is full of code and THAT is what you are attempting to
> save. If some of that content is generated on-the-fly then it might not
> be available when you try to yank it. And any server-side programs that
> are used by the page will not get downloaded when you save the page
> (i.e., you do not get to save a copy of their program). If you truly
> want a STATIC copy of exactly what you see on the screen, get a screen
> capture utility.
>
Again, I don't want a screen capture utility--not even an elegant one. I
want to print to a file I can reload into something to view it EXACTLY as I
saw it 6 months ago--no changes. I want my magazine article to be the same
as when I first viewed it. I want my woodworking plan the same as it is
statically on my browser. I want my bank statement EXACTLY as it was when I
saved it (not controlled by the bank which could have changed it since I
last looked at it). HOW DO I DO THAT!!???
Since it was first viewed in a browser in IE, it would make sense to be able
to load it into an IE brower window to view it once again with NO CHANGES.
If I want to see how the data looks NOW 6 months later, I will go to the web
site. That is what saving a favorite is for. If I want to save something,
I want to see something just as it was when I saved it.

Sorry about this, but I think the concept is important.
> --
>
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 10:39:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi Eric
I think that you mentioned the right solution in your original posting.
Use Adobe Acrobat or another PDF generating software.
There is a very nice and cheap piece of software on www.pdfprinter.dk.
Unfortunately this home page is in Danish, but you can download a fully
functional version from it.
Select the PRO version. It will watermark your your pages if you write more
than 5. It does not expire. From IE it only prints the selected frame. On the
first tab in the properties sheet you can change the language to English.
There are add-ins for Word and Excel
For ordering info write info@pdfprinter.dk

Apart from that, I thing that you have a lousy Internet bank if it doesn't
have the option of downloading your account info as a Excel file.

Best regards
Flemming

"Eric Anderson" wrote:

> I understand what you are trying to say. Let me try to explain what I think
> should happen by answering your comments. Obviously, what I believe does
> not matter a hill of beans, but I think that when I SAVE something, I should
> have total control of it after that time. If someone wants to remove it
> from their site, I have SAVED it so I can recover it whenever I want to.
> What good is saving something if it isn't saved (in total). I respond to
> your specific comments below. I do understand what you are saying, and I
> would like your take on my comments.
>
> "_Vanguard_" <see.signature@email.without.passcode.is.invalid> wrote in
> message news:ec#zRn$0EHA.1408@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >>
> > When you attempt to *save* the page, the browser is going to *try* to
> > yank all the components that were included in that page, some of which
> > is text, some of which might be linked images to files that contain
> > those images, and some might be *generated* content which never does
> > exist in the STATIC web page but gets created when you visit that page
> > (and that page may not even exist on their server any might get
> > completed generated on-the-fly and that content sent to your browser).
>
> On a computer, everything is generated in some way. A Word file is
> assembled by the Microsoft Word application in memory. When a person saves
> a web page, which is more important--being able to recreate the static view
> being displayed on the screen or (at the whim of a remote server still
> having the content) being able to recreate the exact dynamic presentation
> that existed before? I THINK that is what we are talking about here. What
> is the usefulness of saving a web page over saving a favorite that allows
> you to point to the page where the original page was generated.
>
> > If the web site is using a script or program to generate content
> > on-the-fly then that content won't be available when the browser simply
> > attempts to yank all the components on that page. IE saving a web page
> > will attempt to yank the components from that page. I'm sure you have
> > noticed the download dialog window that pops up when you attempt to save
> > a web page. Saving the web page does NOT store the *rendered* version
> > of that page as you see it at a specific time under certain conditions.
>
> I hear you, but I think THAT is what I want. When I try to save a page, I
> am trying to save the content I see on the screen at that time. I am not
> trying to save the entire ability of pulling up records from a remote server
> which might occupy Terabytes. I want to save a plan on how to build a
> woodworking project. I am trying to save a monthly statement (so I can
> refer to it a year later). I am trying to save a newspaper story (which may
> be removed by the publisher) to refer to it later. If I want to search a
> database or work with dynamic information that the server on line can
> provide me, I will choose a favorite and link to the website itself.
>
> > You might have IE in a small-sized window, or expanded to display
> > fullscreen, or you might be navigating to the site from some other site
> > that leaves its frame in that browser's window so the next site or page
> > only gets to use a portion of the browser's window.
> >
> If I am reading you correctly, I could have Word in a small window, that
> does not mean that the Word file I save is not able to be totally
> regenerated when I open Word again and go full screen. Again, I am not
> expecting a dynamic window. I just want the equivalent of my Word file back
> again. Hell, many times the picture content exists in saving the website
> complete, they are just not displayed for some reason.
>
> > If you want to save the web page, that means you want to yank the
> > components of that web page and THAT is what you are attempting to save.
>
> Yes.
>
> > Not all components can be yanked, especially if they are generated by a
> > script or program. If you want to save exactly what you see on your
> > screen in the current instance of the browser's window as it got
> > rendered under THAT environment then get a screen capture program.
>
> They can be yanked at the time you are saving them because they are yanked
> to be displayed on your screen. I don't want a screen capture program
> because the page may be several screens long. I just want to save what I am
> seeing.
> >
> > There is no such thing as a STATIC page when IE is rendering the HTML
> > code in that web page. Text might be centered but obviously centering
> > depends on how wide is the viewing area for the HTML document. Lots of
> > positioning depends on the viewing area and its dimensions. If you
> > actually could save a static copy when your browser window occupied half
> > the size of the screen then looking at it in a browser window that was
> > fullscreen would still only occupy half of the screen (minus the space
> > that was occupied by the browser's toolbars). A table that uses fixed
> > width columns would scroll off to the right of your browser's current
> > window size. You can scroll over to see the rest but not if you only
> > saved a static copy of exactly what you saw in the browser's window
> > before scrolling (and all you would see if you did scroll over would be
> > that half of the page when you view it later).
> >
> Mmmm. If I were to choose, I would ask the SAVE operation to save it so I
> could render it so I could scroll just as I would when I was looking at the
> data on my screen originally. I would not ask it to render new data or data
> that was up to date at the time I retrieved the saved file.
>
> Chuck said simply--print to file. I guess that is what I want. Stupid
> me--I need to understand how to retrieve the damn thing after I do that.
> But I guess that is what I want. An Adobe Acrobat print to file would do
> the trick for me.
>
> > The HTML document is full of code and THAT is what you are attempting to
> > save. If some of that content is generated on-the-fly then it might not
> > be available when you try to yank it. And any server-side programs that
> > are used by the page will not get downloaded when you save the page
> > (i.e., you do not get to save a copy of their program). If you truly
> > want a STATIC copy of exactly what you see on the screen, get a screen
> > capture utility.
> >
> Again, I don't want a screen capture utility--not even an elegant one. I
> want to print to a file I can reload into something to view it EXACTLY as I
> saw it 6 months ago--no changes. I want my magazine article to be the same
> as when I first viewed it. I want my woodworking plan the same as it is
> statically on my browser. I want my bank statement EXACTLY as it was when I
> saved it (not controlled by the bank which could have changed it since I
> last looked at it). HOW DO I DO THAT!!???
> Since it was first viewed in a browser in IE, it would make sense to be able
> to load it into an IE brower window to view it once again with NO CHANGES.
> If I want to see how the data looks NOW 6 months later, I will go to the web
> site. That is what saving a favorite is for. If I want to save something,
> I want to see something just as it was when I saved it.
>
> Sorry about this, but I think the concept is important.
> > --
> >
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 1:41:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

In news:F-6dnaoF06m9TDrcRVn-oA@comcast.com,
Eric Anderson <eganders@yahoo.com> typed:

> This appears elegantly simple!
>
> The last time I printed a prn file, I was using DOS. Excuse
> the
> ignorance, but how can I retrieve the content (i.e. print it or
> view
> it). I tried to drop it on the printer and it wants me to open
> it in
> an application.


If you are already familiar with how to do this in DOS, then do
the same thing in Windows XP: open a command prompt window and
issue the command

copy \path\filename.prn LPT1

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
!