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question about cpu speed?

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October 13, 2006 6:27:35 PM

Hi, I have 2 E6400 system, at first both were idle at 41 degree C, after 2 weeks now one still idles at 41 c, the other one idles at 38 C, I've reading on the forum for some time and notice that's not a big change, but I notice the speed of the cpu were at 1600 mhz (cpu-z), wonder if that's normal? thanks.

the other one with 41 C still shows 2.133 ghz

ps. more info.

cpu c2d E6400
m/b giga ds3
ram crucial 2g ddr2 5300
v/b bef 7900gt
psu thermo 430w

More about : question cpu speed

October 14, 2006 5:57:34 AM

do you use one more than the other. also are they both in the identical case with identical air flow, and what kind of heatsink are you using.
October 14, 2006 7:33:34 AM

The one at 1600mhz is underclocked for some reason. Thats slower then the e6300.
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October 14, 2006 11:19:17 AM

yep psycomonkey is correct, along with C1e and TM2 (thermal monitorng 2) which lower the cpus internal multiplier to 6x therefore the processor will run 533mhz slower than at its stock clock#(1.6 ghz odd lowest speed when speedstep, C1e and TM2 is enabled)

Try prime95, superPI or PCmark 2005 they'll surely bump up the speed back to its stock clock. (2.13ghz, 8x multiplier) :D 

TM2 and C1e are thermal reading programs that, if the cpu runs too hot throttle the speed back to a 6x multiplier, whereas speedstep lowers the speed to conserve energy. AMD use cool 'n' quiet in their cpus.
October 14, 2006 1:50:42 PM

Quote:
do you use one more than the other. also are they both in the identical case with identical air flow, and what kind of heatsink are you using.


yes both identical, stock intel heatsink, the one used more is the one that underclock itself.
and thank you all for the imput.
October 14, 2006 3:19:25 PM

do all intel processors use speedstep or just the new conroe.
October 14, 2006 3:42:31 PM

pentium 4 prescott
pentium d
conroe/allendale

these all support speedstep, although i am unsure which series of P4's support it, i know 6xx series P4s support it... unsure about the 5xx.

edit 5xx must support EIST (enhanced intel speed step) because earlier pentium3 systems did

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speedstep

have a good read. :) 
I found out that some Pentium 3 cpus actually supported speedstep, v1.1!!! :lol:  so does that mean that earlier pentium 4 cpus did as well? or just their mobile variants?

speedstep orignated on pentium m cpus (intel centrino platfrom), i never really thought about that :) 
October 14, 2006 3:50:20 PM

all my other pc's were amd, so i was real familiar with cool n quiet. this is my first intel pc. so the bios was really foreign at the beginning.
October 14, 2006 3:54:46 PM

almost the current processor from intel including Enhanced Intel Speedstep Technology (EIST), i believe it starts from Pentium 4 6xx (running at 2.8ghz) until the very current Core 2 Duo (running at 1,58~1,6ghz).
October 14, 2006 3:59:31 PM

if you use to measure the temperature via core temp, intel thermal analysis tool, or everest ultimate edition, then your current cores temperature is normal 35-45C range with the stock heatsinkfan and the ambient temperature is around 25C. the temperature gets higher when using greater version of c2d.

at ambient temperature 25C my e6600 cores temp idle vary from 39-42C. the speedfan detects as 33-36C. there's a 5C to 15C different reading when using the external temperature and internal diode temperature sensor.
October 14, 2006 4:03:35 PM

currently my core temps are reading 41c core1 and 43c core2 in core temp. i have eist disabled. would the temps be lower with eist enabled?
October 14, 2006 4:12:14 PM

yes, you could lower 3 to 5C with EIST enabled. try to enable it from BIOS, and if still not working, try to set the power management from your control panel to portable/laptop mode or minimal power management mode.

while your computer is idling, check for the cpu speed by clicking on the system properties in control panel or by simply right click on the my computer icon at your desktop. or you can check it via cpu-z software.

your cpu should run at 1,58ghz ~ 1,6ghz with 6x multiplier.
October 14, 2006 4:28:37 PM

what is c1e for in the bios. and how accurate is the hardware monitor in the bios when reading temps.
October 14, 2006 5:23:04 PM

i suppose the C1E is the intel Enhanced Halt State or intel thermal and power management. It will throtle your cpu performance in order not to exceed its temperature treshold or something like that so your cpu won't go overheating. i can't find the C1E article right now, i'll posted it later when i get the chance.

edit1: http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=2725

Quote:

C1E - Enhanced Halt State

"Whenever the OS executes the halt instruction, the CPU enters what is known as the halt state. Architecturally, what's going on in a halt state is the clock signal is shut off to the CPU for some period of time. With no clock signal, none of the logic in the chip will do anything and thus power consumption is reduced. Performance is also significantly reduced; however, the halt instruction isn't usually called during application usage, so the performance aspects of the halt state aren't very important.

The problem with the halt state is that it does nothing to reduce voltage, only current draw by stopping clocks from going to the CPU. Since Power varies linearly with both current and voltage (P = I * V), you're effectively only addressing half of the problem. The Enhanced Halt State, as Intel calls it, does two things: it reduces the clock speed of the CPU by decreasing the clock multiplier down to its minimum value (on the EE 965 series, that's 14x, or 2.8GHz), then reducing the voltage. The clock speed is reduced and then the voltage is dropped, to maintain stability.

Intel insists that the enhanced halt state is a significantly lower power state than the conventional halt state, thanks to the reduction in voltage in addition to the reduction in clock speed. While the standard halt state causes a linear reduction in power, Intel's enhanced halt state causes an exponential decrease in power, potentially offering better power savings than the standard halt state. The real world impact obviously depends on how idle your system happens to be."

EIST:

"What EIST does is very similar to AMD's Cool'n'Quiet. It is demand based reduction in CPU clock speed and voltage. Using the same mechanism of adjusting clock speed and voltage, based on the application demand, the processor will dynamically increase/decrease its clock speed between its minimum clock and its normal operating frequency, as well as voltage, in order to optimize for power consumption.

Because of the way EIST (and AMD's Cool'n'Quiet) works, there's inherently a drop in performance. The idea is this: if you're performing a task that's not using 100% of the CPU, the CPU will operate at a slightly reduced frequency in order to conserve power. So, while some tasks will require that the system run at full speed, others will run at lower speeds. "


i really don't know the accuracy of the reading in BIOS hardware monitoring section. in my motherboard, it reading the internal diode temperature sensor. but different motherboard perhaps run different reading sensor.

i wrote an email to the speedfan creator, and he informed me that there will be core temperatur reading in one of the future version of speedfan. perhaps this will make a different reading temperature point of view which speedfan will both reading the external and internal temperature of the cpu.

as if core temp noted the tcasemax for intel core 2 duo is 85C, the actual temperature for the cpu is 60C. so there's a maximum delta of 15C here between the internal and external reading.

i might be wrong here since my background is not from computer/technical dicipline.
October 14, 2006 5:59:26 PM

Something else I think it’s worth pointing out.
If the other processor is not down-clocking when idle, it is probably because EIST is disabled. (unlikely but possible)
October 14, 2006 6:52:08 PM

Quote:
Something else I think it’s worth pointing out.
If the other processor is not down-clocking when idle, it is probably because EIST is disabled. (unlikely but possible)


he said that already. :) 

Quote:
currently my core temps are reading 41c core1 and 43c core2 in core temp. i have eist disabled. would the temps be lower with eist enabled?


c1e is a thermal monitoring tool, which if the processor runs to hot it will throttle back the speed, thus ruducing the heat output. c1e is the successor to TM2, It is similar to EIST, although EIST throttles back the speed to conserve power not because you might do damage to the processor.

I believe c1e was introduced with 65nm intel cpus.
October 14, 2006 8:45:31 PM

possibilities if the mainboards are the same:
1. the one CPU dissipates more heat than the other(nothing you can do)
2. the thermal diode on the mainboards is displaced(try to swap the CPUs to conclude this)
3. the thermal paste is not applied properly(try reapplying)
4. the system case of the one has better ventilation(check out the coolers and check for any objects near the cases)
October 14, 2006 8:59:14 PM

oh right i actually thought he meant he had ONE e6400 system and he meant that one core showed a higher temp than the other... no wonder why i didt quite get it when the OP said:

Quote:


yes both identical, stock intel heatsink, the one used more is the one that underclock itself.
and thank you all for the imput.


cor! i think i need to read the whole post throughly before posting :lol: 
October 15, 2006 1:36:36 AM

the 2 systems were identical, one for an 11 yrs old gamefreak, the other for a 9 yrs old a future gamefreak :-)........
we order them from a computer store, when we got them home we loaded CPU-Z and PC WIZARD to monitor the machines, at first they both show 41 C, and 2.13 ghz. after 3 weeks of intence 'Oblivion' the 11 yrs old's system show a decrease in temperature to 38 C and speed to 1.6 ghz. ( idle). while the other not too ' abuse ' system stay at 41 C and 2.13 ghz, we did nothing to the computers, it just clockdown itself, is that make any sence?
and thank you all for the imput.
October 15, 2006 3:45:52 AM

Properly applied thermal grease like AS5 takes a while to burn in and then you will see some decrease in temperature. That could be the case here. If you are worried about the 1.6ghz try loading it with oblivion or prime say and then check what your running at.
If the cpu is loaded and it is still running at 1.6ghz then there is something wrong but if not then you have nothing to worry about.

Btw are these machines in the same room ?
It could be that the ambient temp in the one room is warmer then the other room or there is a partial airflow obstruction raising the temps.
You could also try re-applying some AS5 to the one that is running hotter.
Then wait a week or so and see what the temps are at that time.
!