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What are stable OC settings for C2D 6600, 965P-DQ6, OCZ-DDR2

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October 18, 2006 1:28:44 PM

Hi y'all.
W-A-R-N-I-N-G... OC nOOb here.

What would be a set of stable OC settings for my hardware listed below?
Intel C2D-6600, Stock Intel CPU Fan Cooler
Gigabyte Ga-965P-DQ6, F6 BIOS version,
OCZ-DDR2-800?
ATI AIW X1900 256MB GDDR3
3x120mm Fans using (S.M.A.R.T. Fan settings)
UltraX 500W PSU
Dual 750GB SATA2 Seagates.
Pioneer 16x Burner
Windows XP Pro. SP2

I've tried a few things including the Gigabyte Easytune 5 (updated it last night 10-18-2006) & the system is stable until the next reboot.
Using the Easytune 5 I've gotten it to go up to 2.81ghz. But on the next reboot it BSOD's or hangs or reboots on it's own during Windows' bootup.

When I reboot the system freezes or hangs up or BSOD until I remove any OC settings I've done either in the BIOS or in EASYTUNE 5. I end up going back to default settings.
I'd prefer to OC in the BIOS if at all possible & if stable.

PS: My 3DMARK06 score without my attempted OCing is: 4506
Is this normal?

Thanks guys & gals.
October 20, 2006 5:40:45 PM

Thanks, but I was hoping someone would post something that I could use as a starting reference point that I could work with.
Being that I'm a noobie to forumz, is there one central location here where I can find the "STICKIES"? Or do I have to sift through 50,000 message in the past to find 'em? Thanks again.
October 22, 2006 4:56:28 PM

wusy is extremely busy right now so post a thread before PM him and im sure there are other experienced OCer along the forums thatll help you.
The 1.4v vCORE and 2.2v vDIMM he suggestes in the guide are extremely safe. Things will last long enough for you to forget them at those voltages.
Related resources
October 22, 2006 5:54:11 PM

I have a DQ6 with an e6600 and my settings are;

FSB 334 (that's 3.0GHz)
Memory multiplier 2.5 (DDR2-835)
Memory 5-5-5-12
+0.225v on Vdimm

And this cionfigurtation is sytable under Memtest +86 and Prime 95 all day.

I'm using Speedfan to control the fans. I just came out of Oblivion and right now my CPU temp is 43
October 22, 2006 10:24:16 PM

Quote:
Memory multiplier 2.5 (DDR2-835)

Whats your FSB:Memory ratio?
October 22, 2006 10:38:44 PM

Quote:
Memory multiplier 2.5 (DDR2-835)

Whats your FSB:Memory ratio?

4:5
October 22, 2006 10:47:36 PM

Quote:
I have a DQ6 with an e6600 and my settings are;

FSB 334 (that's 3.0GHz)
Memory multiplier 2.5 (DDR2-835)
Memory 5-5-5-12
+0.225v on Vdimm

And this configurtation is sytable under Memtest +86 and Prime 95 all day.

I'm using Speedfan to control the fans. I just came out of Oblivion and right now my CPU temp is 43


Some of this doesn't quite match the text in my BIOS settings. Maybe you can clarify? Here are the settings listed below the Gigabyte BIOS (M.I.T.) Menu Options word-for-word with the F6 BIOS update:

Robust Graphics Booster - [AUTO]
CPU Clock Ratio:
CPU Host Clock Control:
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz):
C.I.A.2:
System Memory Multiplier:
Memory Frequency (Mhz) [this option is shaded out]:

***** System Voltage NOT Optimized!! *****

System Voltage Control:
DDR2 OverVoltage Control:
(G)MCH OverVoltage Control:
FSB OverVoltage Control:
CPU OverVoltage Control:
Normal CPU VCore [this option is shaded out]: 1.32500V

I can't find your suggestion of Vdimm to set it at +0.225v
October 22, 2006 11:14:36 PM

CPU Clock Ratio: [9x]
CPU Host Clock Control: [ENABLED]
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): [334]
System Memory Multiplier: [2.5]
Memory Frequency (Mhz) [this gets filled in automatically]:

(Press f1 at the MAIN bios screen to enable voltage and memory timings - then come back to this screen and set the memory to whatever it says on the sticker - probably 5-5-5-12)


System Voltage Control:
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: [+0.225]


Run Memtest 86+ BEFORE you try to boot Windows. If it won't pass memtest, it'll honk up your copy of windows.
October 23, 2006 2:17:47 AM

Quote:
CPU Clock Ratio: [9x]
CPU Host Clock Control: [ENABLED]
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): [334]
System Memory Multiplier: [2.5]
Memory Frequency (Mhz) [this gets filled in automatically]:

(Press f1 at the MAIN bios screen to enable voltage and memory timings - then come back to this screen and set the memory to whatever it says on the sticker - probably 5-5-5-12)


System Voltage Control:
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: [+0.225]


Run Memtest 86+ BEFORE you try to boot Windows. If it won't pass memtest, it'll honk up your copy of windows.



Thanks. Yeah, my RAM is 5-5-5-12 DDR2-800 OCZ RAM.
I also had to press CTRL+F1 once in the Gigabyte BIOS (M.I.T.) Menu screen then the advanced settings popped up.
My system is now working @ 3Ghz. Before all I kept getting was constant rebooting once WinXP was commencing to boot or BSOD. It seems to be stable now. Now to get Memtest 86+ from somewhere do a test. I'll also run 3DMark06 one more time. This should get it to BSOD, eh-eh-eh.

Thanks to you I've now gotten this far. The best I had gotten it on my own was 2.75Ghz. You live & ya learn. Will keep ya posted on future OCing.
October 23, 2006 2:33:57 AM

Well, using SpeedFan v4.28. I don't trust it cuz it's says the Fan1 is fluctuating it's spinning from 2600 RPM to 56000 RPM. the temp has been at 37C while running a disk backup in the background for a little over an hour now.
We'll see if I get up in a few hours (God 4bid) to the sound of fire trucks.
October 23, 2006 2:38:44 AM

Not the most pleasant alarm clock haha
CPU HSF I meant.
October 23, 2006 11:13:59 AM

Well being that I'm using Speedfan v4.28, the info on the screen for the fans & temp area are:
Fan1: 16875 RPM...............Temp1: 37c
Fan2: 8882 RPM.................Temp2: 35c
Fan3: 7500 RPM.................Temp3: -2c
........................................HD0: 36c
........................................HD2: 36c
........................................HD3: 36c

I hope this is what you were askin...eh?

PS: EasyTune 5 vB6.0912.1 (latest version) says:
CPU Fan: 1237 RPM
PWR Fan1: 1950 RPM
System Fan: 2033

System Temp: 37c / 98F
CPU Temp: 36c / 96F
October 23, 2006 11:44:23 AM

Neither Easy Tune nor Speedfan sense temperatures correctly. Use Intel's Thermal Analysis Tool (TAT)
October 23, 2006 12:02:24 PM

Not your temps, not your fans. The thing youre using to keep your CPU cool! The boxed one?
October 23, 2006 12:50:26 PM

Quote:

Any other questions you have can be answered buy wusy.


8O
<b>buy wusy????</b>
What's the current rate? :p 
October 23, 2006 4:56:20 PM

Oh!!!!, DOH!!! I thought I mentioned this on the very 1st post.
It's the retail Stock Intel CPU Fan Cooler.

I had a really nice one, Silent-775 by Thermaltake, $69, (had it when I had the ASUS P5B mobo), but this Gigabyte mobo can't use it due to the giant heatsinks built into the mobo. So it's just sitting on my desk as a very attractive paper weight. I'll sell it to my cousin as soon as he gets his new system's parts.
October 23, 2006 5:53:01 PM

Quote:
Oh!!!!, DOH!!! I thought I mentioned this on the very 1st post.
My bad, you did :oops: 

Well since you get some money may I recommend the Scythe Inifinty or Thermalright Ultra-120. Pair them with a Silverstone FM121 and youll have an air setup thatll run circles around every low end water cooling kit.
October 24, 2006 1:57:28 AM

Quote:

Any other questions you have can be answered buy wusy.


8O
<b>buy wusy????</b>
What's the current rate? :p 

STOCK ALERT!!!
"Wusy" stock is up 1.25Ghz
Wusy stock symbol: W( :twisted: ) Wusy + Evil = Wevil???
October 24, 2006 3:52:51 AM

W T F
pass the buddha this way
October 24, 2006 12:30:50 PM

You know you can remove that heatsink on the back of the mobo... It's not vital or anything.
October 24, 2006 5:23:55 PM

Quote:
You know you can remove that heatsink on the back of the mobo... It's not vital or anything.


I came close to doing it. I spoke to tech supp about that, But it would void my mobo's warranty. I'll do it when it expires.
October 25, 2006 12:08:49 AM

Ok, yea, I was just throwing that out there. It's really not that effective IMO, if these companies are so pro-overclocking they should really just bundle aftermarket air-coolers with their MB's, it'd be more effective.
October 25, 2006 1:36:34 PM

With the bad luck I've had in putting this system together. I'll wait a little longer B4 I remove it since it has to be cut away from the spungy adhesive they used. I've already had to replace everything in this system within the 1st 30 days of purchasing & building it this past August. That's why I ended up with Gigabyte & trashed the ASUS P5B mobo I had back in August.

Now to see if I can get this to go past 3.07Ghz using the suggested changes which Sruane gave me. Currently, it refuses to go past 3.07Ghz. The system keeps rebooting & defaulting back to the standard settings & bring the mobo back to it's 2.40Ghz stock state.
I'd like to bring it to at least 3.2Ghz, Stable.

So far these are my stable at 3.07Ghz settings:

[Gigabyte BIOS (M.I.T.) Menu Options word-for-word with the F6 BIOS update]

Robust Graphics Booster: [AUTO]
CPU Clock Ratio: (9x)
CPU Host Clock Control: [Enabled]
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): [340]
PCI Express Frequency (Mhz) [100]
C.I.A.2: [Disabled]
System Memory Multiplier: [2.50]

Memory Frequency (Mhz) {this option is shaded out}: [835]

======================================

{Pressing Ctrl + F1 key Combo At Main BIOS Screen Enables DRAM Timings Below}

DRAM Timing Selectable: [Manual]
CAS Latency Time: [5]
DRAM RAS# To CAS# Delay: [5]
DRAM RAS# Precharge: [5]
Precharge Delay: [12]
ACT to ACT Delay: [Auto]
Rank Write To READ Delay: [Auto]
Write To Precharge Delay: [Auto]
Refresh To ACT Delay: [0]
Read To Precharge Delay: [Auto]
Memory Performance Enhance: [Normal]

======================================

{blinking} ***** System Voltage NOT Optimized!! ***** {blinking}

======================================

System Voltage Control: [Manual]
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: [+0.225V]

PCI-E OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
{option appears after pressing Ctrl + F1 key combo}

(G)MCH OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
FSB OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
CPU OverVoltage Control: [1.40000V]

Normal CPU VCore {this option is shaded out}: [1.32500V]
October 25, 2006 9:30:30 PM

Quote:
System Memory Multiplier: [2.50]

2.00

Quote:
Precharge Delay: [12]

15

Quote:
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: [+0.225V]

+0.4v

Let me know how it goes :D 
October 26, 2006 12:04:43 AM

Quote:
Robust Graphics Booster: [AUTO]

Disable that crap.

It's not an option to disable it.
The options are: AUTO, FAST, TURBO.

Now I've made some additional changes based on the recommendations from "rwaritsdario". The system is now running at 3.21ghz. If I bring it to 3.22ghz the system stays stuck in a reboot cycle. I had to unplug the power to the PC, hold down the F1 key & the system booted backup using the old F3 BIOS backup it had. I just reflasshed the system & am back to the F6 version. These are the current stable settings.

So far these are my stable at 3.15Ghz settings:

[Gigabyte BIOS (M.I.T.) Menu Options word-for-word with the F6 BIOS update]

Robust Graphics Booster: [AUTO]
CPU Clock Ratio: (9x)
CPU Host Clock Control: [Enabled]
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): [357]
PCI Express Frequency (Mhz) [Auto]
C.I.A.2: [Disabled]
System Memory Multiplier: [2.00]

Memory Frequency (Mhz) {this option is shaded out}: [870]

======================================

{Pressing Ctrl + F1 key Combo At Main BIOS Screen Enables DRAM Timings Below}

DRAM Timing Selectable: [Manual]
CAS Latency Time: [5]
DRAM RAS# To CAS# Delay: [5]
DRAM RAS# Precharge: [5]
Precharge Delay: [15]
ACT to ACT Delay: [Auto]
Rank Write To READ Delay: [Auto]
Write To Precharge Delay: [Auto]
Refresh To ACT Delay: [0]
Read To Precharge Delay: [Auto]
Memory Performance Enhance: [Normal]

======================================

{blinking} ***** System Voltage NOT Optimized!! ***** {blinking}

======================================

System Voltage Control: [Manual]
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: [+0.400V]

PCI-E OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
{option appears after pressing Ctrl + F1 key combo}

(G)MCH OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
FSB OverVoltage Control: [Normal]
CPU OverVoltage Control: [1.40000V]

Normal CPU VCore {this option is shaded out}: [1.32500V]
_________________
E6600 2.40Ghz C2D, Gigabyte GA-965P-DQ6
OCZ Gold DDR2-800 2GB
Ultra Grid 500W PSU
ATI AIW X1900 256MB, Pioneer 16x Burner
750GB SATA2 HD's
3DMARK06 score no OCing: 4506
3DMARK06 score OC'd @ 3Ghz: 4833
bMark2 Timing @3.06Ghz: 18.98 secs.
October 26, 2006 12:32:22 AM

Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
October 26, 2006 1:03:56 AM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1


Yep using the Intel Stock Fan.
I just downloaded the Intel TAT from http://www.100mbit.ws/intel/TAT.exe. The CPU-0/CPU-1 temps are fluctuating between 55C & 57C @ 3.21Ghz.

I think I'll back it down to about 3.15Ghz since that's cutting it close.

You're right. EasyTune 5 says the CPU is at 38C & the mobo is at 38C.
October 26, 2006 1:24:50 AM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

After reading this I backed off my CPU down to 3.15Ghz. The temp is down to 48C from 58C after running the stress test that's part of the Intel TAT.
Thanks. I think I'll be adding one more 120MM fan to my case for a total of four.
October 26, 2006 1:31:55 AM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

Well, according to Intel's technical specification sheet for this processor, its 60.1 - and no asked you to explain anything - so get over yourself.
October 26, 2006 2:14:40 AM

Quote:
Oh!!!!, DOH!!! I thought I mentioned this on the very 1st post.
My bad, you did :oops: 

Well since you get some money may I recommend the Scythe Inifinty or Thermalright Ultra-120. Pair them with a Silverstone FM121 and youll have an air setup thatll run circles around every low end water cooling kit.

If he takes that Silverstone FM121 and pairs it with a Thermalright SI-128 he will likely get better total cooling results.

The Thermalright Ultra-120, which is a blow-thru cooler, offers insane CPU cooling (I know because I own one) but does not provide the total CPU/chipset cooling that the Thermalright SI-128, which is a blow-down cooler (I know because I own two of these).

On that motherboard, the passive heat-pipe chipset section gets a lot of cool loving from a blow-down setup.

If he pairs it with that fan, he can tweak the perfect high airflow, low-noise setup because you've recommended an easily adjustable fan.

The Thermalright SI-128 is also very good at CPU cooling. But I don't think anything beats the Thermalright Ultra-120 for straight CPU cooling.

Good cooling should include the chipsets, too.
October 26, 2006 2:42:33 AM

Blah leave the mobo cooling to the side panel fan.
With the Infinity (and I think Ultra-120 too) you can use two 120mm fans on a push&pull setup, such you couldnt on a down blower cooler.
October 26, 2006 3:26:54 AM

Quote:
Blah leave the mobo cooling to the side panel fan.
With the Infinity (and I think Ultra-120 too) you can use two 120mm fans on a push&pull setup, such you couldnt on a down blower cooler.



Meh. You can use two fans, but you don't get any improvement because the designs are so strong to begin with. At least on the Ultra-120.

This is the SI-128 and it is a massive, badass, blow-down, mofo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?Image=35%2D...

Those are 8mm heatpipes on that rig. You dig? Massive.

I have both of those coolers. Blow-down is better for total results on a motherboard like the DQ6, and actually better for most others, too.

Why? Because the OEMs like Gigabyte are grouping critical parts around the CPU and using passive, but deeply extruded or finned aluminum or copper parts that take large airstream cooling generated by blow-down cooling and using this airstream to very efficiently cool the chipsets, memory modules, and VRM/Mosfets as well as the CPU.

Here's a picture of that board:
http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Products/ViewImage.aspx?Prod...

That cooler sits like a big wing right over all the critical parts I mentioned and blows air at very close range right on them.

This results in high system stability for the longterm and will allow good overclocking along with greater stability. You can also end up with a quieter system if you use a variable speed fan and adjust for results.

And it should really work great with a case that has three 120mm fans moving air through the case.

You can't get that kind of cooling from a side case fan unless it is connected to a 5 horsepower Briggs and Stratton motor and you like the sound of jet engines right next to you.
October 26, 2006 3:56:25 AM

Quote:
Meh. You can use two fans, but you don't get any improvement because the designs are so strong to begin with. At least on the Ultra-120.

Have you tried it??
October 26, 2006 9:32:31 AM

Quote:
Meh. You can use two fans, but you don't get any improvement because the designs are so strong to begin with. At least on the Ultra-120.

Have you tried it??

No. I didn't need to. Read on...

Before I got the Ultra-120 (which is what I got first), I saw two different reviews where the reviewer was all geeked about slapping a second fan on (push-pull) and getting even lower temps, but when they did there was no improvement. The temps were already totally frickin low with one 120mm fan running fast, but nearly silent (~1800).

I got the Ultra-120. You have to see it to get an idea. Its huge. The fins are not as close together as on other coolers, but they are wide, and it has a lot of heat pipes.

I put a Panaflo on it (running through a Vantec 4-channel controller) and turned it up til I got a very soft woosh. It was on an E6300 C2D getting low idle temps, I cranked 2 Prime 95s (one on each CPU core) and it went up about 8 degress C and stopped and just stayed there, whether I turned the fan soft or real fast (Panaflo Ultra-High). Just stayed rock solid cool.

So I could tell it was using all the airflow it needed. And that's good because with one 120x38mm it is frickin wide. On my test system (Intel Bad Axe) there wouldn't be enough room to add a second fan the way I had it mounted (blowing air stright out the exhaust 120mm case fan), which is blowing front to back. With a second fan it would actually collide with the exhaust fan, also a 120x38mm Panaflo.

The chipsets and peripheral components needed cooling (additional smaller fans blowing on them) to be where I wanted them to be. They need relatively strong air turbulence. That's when the guy at heatsinkfactory clued me to the SI-128. Thermalright had just released them and they thought it was the shizzit.

The SI-128 is also huge, but in a different way, and has really fat heat pipes. The difference with that cooler is that when using it, the northbrige and ICH7R and other test point near the memory modules (all four slots loaded with 4GB total RAM) were *way* cooler. And this was whether the fan was silent or giving a good woosh.

And although the CPU (now using E6600s) may have been 1 or 2 degrees C warmer during different Prime 95 stressings, the peripherals were much cooler, and stayed cooler. And the systems (two of them) are as stable as I've seen. And I'm running the E6600s 24/7 at 3.11GHz with 4GB RAM.

I run Windows Server 2003 SP1 with VMware Server 1.01 on top and on each system (in the VM environment) I'm running two Windows 2003 server SP1 as domain controllers, 4 XP SP2 systems and an XP 64-bit system all at the same time, all the while doing other work on the consoles and they (VMs) and the host OS run fast and rock solid stable. I'm working those bitches.
October 26, 2006 3:17:32 PM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

Well, according to Intel's technical specification sheet for this processor, its 60.1 - and no asked you to explain anything - so get over yourself.

Wow, Srurane, you have no idea what you're talking about! Really, you should watch what you post before someone accidentally heeds your crap advice. The "Thermal Specification" listed on Intel's spec sheet refers to the maximum CASE temperature at maximum TDP for the processor, in the case of a 6600, that's 65W. So if you're cranking that much juice through the CPU in a case that's above 60C, what do you think the core temp is going to be? Bet it's higher than 60! I'd explain more in-depth, but you probably wouldn't understand anyway. Suzukii, feel free to exceed 60C on your CPU, you can't hurt the darn thing, it'll take care of itself. Get a better HSF though, it'll help your CPU and Mobo last a bit longer. A top-down is better in your case, with the DQ6's hefty Vregs.
October 26, 2006 3:45:55 PM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

Well, according to Intel's technical specification sheet for this processor, its 60.1 - and no asked you to explain anything - so get over yourself.

Wow, Srurane, you have no idea what you're talking about! Really, you should watch what you post before someone accidentally heeds your crap advice. The "Thermal Specification" listed on Intel's spec sheet refers to the maximum CASE temperature at maximum TDP for the processor, in the case of a 6600, that's 65W. So if you're cranking that much juice through the CPU in a case that's above 60C, what do you think the core temp is going to be? Bet it's higher than 60! I'd explain more in-depth, but you probably wouldn't understand anyway. Suzukii, feel free to exceed 60C on your CPU, you can't hurt the darn thing, it'll take care of itself. Get a better HSF though, it'll help your CPU and Mobo last a bit longer. A top-down is better in your case, with the DQ6's hefty Vregs.

According to Intel, the CASE temeprature is defined as the temperature at the geometric center of the surface of the processor. The CASE Intel is referring to is the processor's "case".
October 26, 2006 4:13:34 PM

Quote:
Blah leave the mobo cooling to the side panel fan.
With the Infinity (and I think Ultra-120 too) you can use two 120mm fans on a push&pull setup, such you couldnt on a down blower cooler.



Meh. You can use two fans, but you don't get any improvement because the designs are so strong to begin with. At least on the Ultra-120.

This is the SI-128 and it is a massive, badass, blow-down, mofo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?Image=35%2D...

Those are 8mm heatpipes on that rig. You dig? Massive.

I have both of those coolers. Blow-down is better for total results on a motherboard like the DQ6, and actually better for most others, too.

:?: My main concern is will the Thermalright SI-128 cooler fit?
I made a mock up using the dimensions given on http://thermalright.com website. I'm concerned with the space in between the heatpipes coming from this heatsink & the space in between the Northbridge heatsink on the left which rises 1.25" inches. That's my main concern.
Since I have an Ultra ATX case the removable side panel came with a blow down tube (or better described as a blow-in side tube since the case is standing upright). IT's about 2.5 inches long & there's about .5 inches of clearance from the top of the Intel Retail CPU cooler & the bottom edge of this tube. I'm sure I could, but would hate to remove cuz it seems like a pretty good idea to have a CPU cooler sucking in air directly from the outside of the case through this tube & placing air straight on to the top of the CPU instead of using the already warmed air that's already been passed other components, like my 4 SATA-2 hard drives, from the bottom front case fan that's sucking in which this case came with built-in.
Hmmmm...decisions, decisions, decisions.... :roll:
October 26, 2006 4:39:46 PM

Quote:
Blah leave the mobo cooling to the side panel fan.
With the Infinity (and I think Ultra-120 too) you can use two 120mm fans on a push&pull setup, such you couldnt on a down blower cooler.



Meh. You can use two fans, but you don't get any improvement because the designs are so strong to begin with. At least on the Ultra-120.

This is the SI-128 and it is a massive, badass, blow-down, mofo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?Image=35%2D...

Those are 8mm heatpipes on that rig. You dig? Massive.

I have both of those coolers. Blow-down is better for total results on a motherboard like the DQ6, and actually better for most others, too.

:?: My main concern is will the Thermalright SI-128 cooler fit?
I drew up a mock up using the dimensions given on http://thermalright.com website. I'm concerned with the space in between the heatpipes coming from this heatsink & the space in between the Northbridge heatsink on the left which rises 1.25" inches. That's my main concern.
Since I have an Ultra ATX case the removable side panel came with a blow down tube (or better described as a blow-in side tube since the case is standing upright). IT's about 2.5 inches long & there's about .5 inches of clearance from the top of the Intel Retail CPU cooler & the bottom edge of this tube. I'm sure I could, but would hate to remove cuz it seems like a pretty good idea to have a CPU cooler sucking in air directly from the outside of the case through this tube & placing air straight on to the top of the CPU instead of using the already warmed air that's already been passed other components, like my 4 SATA-2 hard drives, from the bottom front case fan that's sucking in which this case came with built-in.
Hmmmm...decisions, decisions, decisions.... :roll:

If you've got a funky non-standard case, I don't know.

If your case clearances are all right, no problem with the motherboard. Put the wing side (opposite of heat-pipe side) over the northbridge if you need to clear any tall obstacles. You can orient it any way you like.

I recommend getting a nice strong variable fan so you can set the speed perfectly. If you have three 120mm fans moving air through your case you can get a Vantec four-channel controller (and the SI-128 and high speed Panaflo fan) from www.heatsinkfactory.com and you will be able to control all of your fans. I usually take the wimpy case fans out and replace them with something a bit stronger and then adjust speed with a controller.

If you get the controller setup and any of your fans need a longer 3-pin cable, just get 3-pin extenders from heatsinkfactory and you're all set.

I don't know if that fits your scenario, though.

And if, for some reason, you have a case opening directly over the SI-128 you are really going to get extra cool temps. If a side case fan gets in the way, remove it. You won't need it as long as you're intaking and exhausting air with two decent (non-wimpy) 120mm case fans.
October 26, 2006 5:06:42 PM

Quote:
I usually take the wimpy case fans out and replace them with something a bit stronger and then adjust speed with a controller.

If a side case fan gets in the way, remove it. You won't need it as long as you're intaking and exhausting air with two decent (non-wimpy) 120mm case fans.


Yeah, that was the 1st thing I did was to replace the dual 90mm case fans with 120mm mobo controllable fans & added a 3rd one.
I think I'll end up getting the SI-128 & just change it's orientation over the CPU. I think I have clearance from the side tube opening (I hope :? ) based on my mock up paper cooler. The tube would have to go to install another 120mm fan in it's place though. I'll do that this weekend. Waiting for the local PC show to see what goodies they may have.
October 26, 2006 11:32:00 PM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

Well, according to Intel's technical specification sheet for this processor, its 60.1 - and no asked you to explain anything - so get over yourself.

Wow, Srurane, you have no idea what you're talking about! Really, you should watch what you post before someone accidentally heeds your crap advice. The "Thermal Specification" listed on Intel's spec sheet refers to the maximum CASE temperature at maximum TDP for the processor, in the case of a 6600, that's 65W. So if you're cranking that much juice through the CPU in a case that's above 60C, what do you think the core temp is going to be? Bet it's higher than 60! I'd explain more in-depth, but you probably wouldn't understand anyway. Suzukii, feel free to exceed 60C on your CPU, you can't hurt the darn thing, it'll take care of itself. Get a better HSF though, it'll help your CPU and Mobo last a bit longer. A top-down is better in your case, with the DQ6's hefty Vregs.

According to Intel, the CASE temeprature is defined as the temperature at the geometric center of the surface of the processor. The CASE Intel is referring to is the processor's "case".

NO, you're actually still wrong. Obviously you did a little research this time, but you missed an important point. Case temperature is measured at the geometric center of the CPU, true, but it's measured ABOVE the heatsink. The Die of the processor is covered by a heat spreader, not a case. Seriously, I admire the fact that you're trying to help, but don't lash out at people like wusy who have actually established themselves around here. I haven't posted that much, you can safely lash out at me if you want, but it's kinda pointless when you're wrong. Check your facts in the future, and if in doubt, ask someone or at least admit that you're wrong.
October 26, 2006 11:36:46 PM

Quote:
I usually take the wimpy case fans out and replace them with something a bit stronger and then adjust speed with a controller.

If a side case fan gets in the way, remove it. You won't need it as long as you're intaking and exhausting air with two decent (non-wimpy) 120mm case fans.


Yeah, that was the 1st thing I did was to replace the dual 90mm case fans with 120mm mobo controllable fans & added a 3rd one.
I think I'll end up getting the SI-128 & just change it's orientation over the CPU. I think I have clearance from the side tube opening (I hope :? ) based on my mock up paper cooler. The tube would have to go to install another 120mm fan in it's place though. I'll do that this weekend. Waiting for the local PC show to see what goodies they may have.

If it's really close you could always bend the heatpipes on the 128 a bit, just be extremely careful not to crimp them. I'd only worry if it couldn't be installed or if it was physically resting on the NB HS. Make sure you get a tube of artic silver with the 128, and remember there's new guidance for its application onto a Core 2. Just read what artic's website has to say, don't listen to anyone's harebrained method which may or may not work.
October 27, 2006 12:08:21 AM

Quote:
Watch your temperatures. What does Intel TAT say your temperatures are? (Don't use Easy Tune to read the temperatures - its way off) You're using stock cooling, right? I bet you're in the 70s. Excuse me if you already knew this, but the e6600 has a maximum design temperature of 60.1
no

This is actually getting more than annoying after having to expain it the 5th time.

Well, according to Intel's technical specification sheet for this processor, its 60.1 - and no asked you to explain anything - so get over yourself.

Wow, Srurane, you have no idea what you're talking about! Really, you should watch what you post before someone accidentally heeds your crap advice. The "Thermal Specification" listed on Intel's spec sheet refers to the maximum CASE temperature at maximum TDP for the processor, in the case of a 6600, that's 65W. So if you're cranking that much juice through the CPU in a case that's above 60C, what do you think the core temp is going to be? Bet it's higher than 60! I'd explain more in-depth, but you probably wouldn't understand anyway. Suzukii, feel free to exceed 60C on your CPU, you can't hurt the darn thing, it'll take care of itself. Get a better HSF though, it'll help your CPU and Mobo last a bit longer. A top-down is better in your case, with the DQ6's hefty Vregs.

According to Intel, the CASE temeprature is defined as the temperature at the geometric center of the surface of the processor. The CASE Intel is referring to is the processor's "case".

NO, you're actually still wrong. Obviously you did a little research this time, but you missed an important point. Case temperature is measured at the geometric center of the CPU, true, but it's measured ABOVE the heatsink. The Die of the processor is covered by a heat spreader, not a case. Seriously, I admire the fact that you're trying to help, but don't lash out at people like wusy who have actually established themselves around here. I haven't posted that much, you can safely lash out at me if you want, but it's kinda pointless when you're wrong. Check your facts in the future, and if in doubt, ask someone or at least admit that you're wrong.

Well, according to Intel, its measured on the SURFACE of the Integrated Heat Spreader. For some reason Intel calls this the CASE temperature.

ftp://download.intel.com/design/processor/designex/3136...

Section 2.2.1, page 18.
October 27, 2006 12:45:20 AM

Quote:
[...]
Just read what artic's website has to say, don't listen to anyone's harebrained method which may or may not work.

You mean like "you could always bend the heatpipes a bit"?

Dude, those are 8mm heatpipes. Total fatties. Thick. One, they are not going to want to "bend". Two, they are all connected tightly (soldered?) to the fins in the wing body. Any change resulting from trying to bend a heat pipe is going to try to pull that entire fin wing body out of alignment. You don't want to try bending those unless you're wearing a pair of "Bad Idea" jeans and you like smoking El Explodo cigars.

ROTFLMAO
October 27, 2006 12:48:38 AM

Oh, you're right. Darn it, I just looked at that bloody .pdf before I replied to the last one. I apologize, I'll spend the next few days banging my head against a wall somewhere.
October 27, 2006 12:54:18 AM

Quote:
[...]
Just read what artic's website has to say, don't listen to anyone's harebrained method which may or may not work.

You mean like "you could always bend the heatpipes a bit"?

Dude, those are 8mm heatpipes. Total fatties. Thick. One, they are not going to want to "bend". Two, they are all connected tightly (soldered?) to the fins in the wing body. Any change resulting from trying to bend a heat pipe is going to try to pull that entire fin wing body out of alignment. You don't want to try bending those unless you're wearing a pair of "Bad Idea" jeans and you like smoking El Explodo cigars.

ROTFLMAO

Your analogy Krax me up. It was a humorous moment over here.
Ever see an old episode of Bugs Bunny lighting up the explosive cigar for Elmer Fudd? Well, I did look like that one day this past summer when I tried that exact same theory on my motorcycle. I was wearing that same brand pair of jeans, too. It cost me $300 to correct later on.
October 27, 2006 3:03:49 AM

Quote:
You don't want to try bending those unless you're wearing a pair of "Bad Idea" jeans and you like smoking El Explodo cigars.

:lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
October 27, 2006 11:00:48 AM

Quote:

More or less, that was how Intel did it.

CoreTemp/TAT as expained before in that thread has only the ability to measure TM2 trigger threshold and has zero ability to measure absolute value of temperature.
The value you see is a proportion, based on 85C(trigger for 130nm A64) for CoreTemp it's original purpose and 84C(trigger for P4) for TAT. Both have been updated over the years and now accomodates C2D's TM2, but to save complete re-programming Tmax was kept the same.
There's plenty of evidence of thottling @85C on CoreTemp when monitored by ThrottleWatch, a threshold set differently for each processor.
It's the reason why I designed the OC guide for people to read the delta between load and idle only as it's in only a proportion(a fairly accurate one).

Heck, this is the 6th time I've explained it in more detail.


But you say it so eloquently every time.
It sounds betta wen U doo It! (with a brooklyn accent)
!