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GUIDE: 3+GHz Core 2 Duo Budget System for $631 (Overclock)

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October 18, 2006 1:34:55 PM

THREAD CLOSED

Check New Guide with Updated Parts, Prices, and Settings.
October 19, 2006 2:22:22 AM

Can this all be bought from one place? How much would shipping be?
October 19, 2006 3:17:07 AM

Nice build, I might build that as a second comp for friends who come over! Is that with stock cooler?

Best,

3Ball
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October 19, 2006 4:05:50 AM

I bought most of the parts from a local dealer, and nagotiated the price, since I bought everything from him. Besides, most of those parts comes with a free shipping, except for the casing as far as I remember.

What I did was, print out the prices from other websites, including NewEgg, brought it to his store, and nagotiated. In fact, the total I paid was exactly USD$637, since I had a 56k internal modem for faxing purposes.

And yes, I'm on stock cooling. The extra 5x fans did a lot of cooling. I took pictures of my computer, including everything, inside out, but I couldn't post it as I do not have a Compact Flash card reader with me, and my digital camera's cable went missing. :( 
October 19, 2006 4:31:05 AM

Is it that all C2D are that easyly OC'ed or you have to find and but C2D proc that have unique ID number or whatsoever that can be stable enough to be OC'ed?
Coz i've done just one or two OC'ing with P4 and some can manage to gain 30% increse in speed while others are only manage at about 15% without raising the VCore.
October 19, 2006 4:31:30 AM

Is it that all C2D are that easily OC'ed or you have to find and buy C2D proc that have unique ID number or whatsoever that can be stable enough to be OC'ed?
Coz i've done just one or two OC'ing with P4 and some can manage to gain 30% increse in speed while others are only manage at about 15% without raising the VCore.
October 19, 2006 4:41:34 AM

It's usually the motherboard, ram, and cpu that makes the difference.

In this case, I assume that all the E6300 distributed around, are all the same, as they're all the same Allendale core, the stripped down L2 cache of Conroe.

If you purchase the same ram, or proven overclock friendly ones, and motherboard, you can easily achieve these numbers.

The reason I think all the E6300 can achieve at least 3GHz when things are done correctly is because, I'm currently running at 3.367GHz and below the stock Vcore, and with stock cooling, I'm at 60C at full load, running perfectly stable. When at 3GHz, full load runs at 55C, at even way lower Vcore.

Like I said, all E6300 has the ability to hit 3GHz, if you can't hit that speed, I'm pretty sure you did something wrong with your settings, or your other parts (ram, motherboard, psu, etc) aren't allowing you to do so.
October 19, 2006 4:54:23 AM

Actually, I do have alot of things to critize from your build.

Unless the S3 uses the same BIOS as the DS3 (almost sure they dont), The Abit AB9 series would outperform at overclocking for only $10 more.

Corsair RAM doesnt always come in the cheapest and it performs on par with alot of other manufacturer. Pick the cheapest 1GB stick (proven to OC easier) of 5400 with 4-4-4-12 timings, for sure it will go to 430Mhz CL5 with some voltage help.

The X800GTO outrageously outperforms the 7300GT and its $3 more.

CoolerMaster isnt a known good brand for PSU. Swap for something with better quality.
October 19, 2006 4:59:02 AM

Quote:
It's usually the motherboard, ram, and cpu that makes the difference.


Which one is better RAM for C2D? DDR2 800MHz with Latency 5 or DDR2 667 with Latency 4?

Thx
October 19, 2006 5:07:08 AM

Quote:
Actually, I do have alot of things to critize from your build.

Unless the S3 uses the same BIOS as the DS3 (almost sure they dont), The Abit AB9 series would outperform at overclocking for only $10 more.

Corsair RAM doesnt always come in the cheapest and it performs on par with alot of other manufacturer. Pick the cheapest 1GB stick (proven to OC easier) of 5400 with 4-4-4-12 timings, for sure it will go to 430Mhz CL5 with some voltage help.

The X800GTO outrageously outperforms the 7300GT and its $3 more.

CoolerMaster isnt a known good brand for PSU. Swap for something with better quality.


There's only 3 differences between the S3 and DS3.
- RAID support
- Capacitors
- Price

In my setup, it's totally budget wise, and no plans for RAID (more HDD costs more money). Whether or not the AB9 can overclock much better with an additional $10, that I can't argue as I do not own a AB9, and can't make a comparison. But, running my E6300 at 3.367GHz, with stock cooling, on a generic casing, and below stock Vcore, running full load at 59C, I believe my motherboard has much more to offer. Imagine I'm using a much better casing, a much better HSF, I would definitely be able to go way higher. In fact, I can go higher now, but I want to stay below 60C under all circumstances, to be 100% rock solid stable. What else can I complain after achieving such results at such price? Besides, the cheapest AB9 on NewEgg goes for $130, mine cost me $105, that's $25 difference. $25 can get me a OEM Open Box Big Typhoon shipped for free from NewEgg.

True, the Corsair does cost quite a bit more, but no doubt they're a great overclocker. In fact, when I was at my local store, Corsair was the only DDR2 RAM they had that was below CL5. Besides they're the cheapest, compared to the DDR2-800 models, which costs much more, and are CL5. What I've done now is clocked it above the DDR2-800 CL5 settings, for a much lower price.

X800GTO is definitely better than 7300GT in games. But forget not, this is the DDR3 model, which runs faster than the regular DDR2 model. Although it's still slower than X800GTO, it supports SM3.0, and it's newer technology. SM3.0 and DDR3 is the reason I went for 7300GT. Besides, old stuffs aren't sold at my local store. :( 

CoolerMaster isn't a known good brand for PSU, but their price are decent, compared to other unknown brands. So far, running on my settings on stock HSF, with these settings at 3.367GHz, rock solid stable, and the PSU has yet to give me any problems after stress testing maximum heat and power consumption for over 8 hours and counting.

Again, I repeat, I really can't complain for what I'm getting for the price I paid. :p 
October 19, 2006 5:15:20 AM

Thats 3 differences, lol...jp

Best,

3Ball
October 19, 2006 5:17:20 AM

Quote:
Thats 3 differences, lol...jp

Best,

3Ball


LOL... Thanks for correcting me. :p 
October 19, 2006 5:21:43 AM

Quote:
It's usually the motherboard, ram, and cpu that makes the difference.


Which one is better RAM for C2D? DDR2 800MHz with Latency 5 or DDR2 667 with Latency 4?

Thx

It all depends on the quality/brand. For the price difference, I'd go for a good DDR2-667 with CL4. A good DDR2-667 RAM with stock CL4, can easily outperform a DDR2-800 CL5, by setting the CL to 5, and with a bit of bump in Vdimm. But then, a DDR2-667 will have difficulties hitting extremely high FSB. If you got the money, go for the low latency DDR2-800 modules.
October 19, 2006 11:38:01 AM

Quote:


There's only 3 differences between the S3 and DS3.
- RAID support
- Capacitors
- Price

In my setup, it's totally budget wise, and no plans for RAID (more HDD costs more money). Whether or not the AB9 can overclock much better with an additional $10, that I can't argue as I do not own a AB9, and can't make a comparison. But, running my E6300 at 3.367GHz, with stock cooling, on a generic casing, and below stock Vcore, running full load at 59C, I believe my motherboard has much more to offer. Imagine I'm using a much better casing, a much better HSF, I would definitely be able to go way higher. In fact, I can go higher now, but I want to stay below 60C under all circumstances, to be 100% rock solid stable. What else can I complain after achieving such results at such price? Besides, the cheapest AB9 on NewEgg goes for $130, mine cost me $105, that's $25 difference. $25 can get me a OEM Open Box Big Typhoon shipped for free from NewEgg.

The DS3 uses all Solid capacitors while the S3 uses electrolytic ones that tend to last up to 5 times less than the solid ones. The life expentancy is of course lowered with OCing since it puts such a high load on the motherboard. RAID support is added for the futureproof ability of the motheboard. Seems like Gigabyte really went cheap on it...
While the Abit AB9 is only $15 more than the S3 and it DOES use this type of capacitors. Its got RAID support. The S3 has a FSB top of 500Mhz while the AB9 has a top of 600Mhz.
For the above reasons is why wusy didnt suggest it on its C2D OCing guide.

Quote:


True, the Corsair does cost quite a bit more, but no doubt they're a great overclocker. In fact, when I was at my local store, Corsair was the only DDR2 RAM they had that was below CL5. Besides they're the cheapest, compared to the DDR2-800 models, which costs much more, and are CL5. What I've done now is clocked it above the DDR2-800 CL5 settings, for a much lower price.

This PQI stick not only is $33 less but it uses the same Micron D9GCT chips as Corsair, therefore WILL perform the same. They run at 1.8v at the advertised specs, newegg got it wrong. Dual-channel has prooven a 3-5% improoving in real life apps so no worries about that.
By the way, here you stated that youre running them at 2.1v, now youre saying 1.9v?

Quote:

X800GTO is definitely better than 7300GT in games. But forget not, this is the DDR3 model, which runs faster than the regular DDR2 model. Although it's still slower than X800GTO, it supports SM3.0, and it's newer technology. SM3.0 and DDR3 is the reason I went for 7300GT. Besides, old stuffs aren't sold at my local store. :( 

Considering that newegg just recently stocked a Leadtek 7300GT 128mb DDR3, I would pick the X800GTO for raw performance and the 7300GT if you WILL use the SM3.0

Quote:
CoolerMaster isn't a known good brand for PSU, but their price are decent, compared to other unknown brands. So far, running on my settings on stock HSF, with these settings at 3.367GHz, rock solid stable, and the PSU has yet to give me any problems after stress testing maximum heat and power consumption for over 8 hours and counting.

My biggest complain with the CoolerMaster is that its got a single, very weak 12v rail. This Raidmax PSU, uses the same hardware as Antec, its got more power and a stronger 12v rail. Cheaper, better, blue.

Quote:

Again, I repeat, I really can't complain for what I'm getting for the price I paid. :p 

I not flaming completly your setup, but you shouldnt recommend something based on only your experience. There are better things in the market that might be more suitable for other users. Youve got a good setup, no doubt about that, but im just trying to make it better :wink:
October 19, 2006 12:33:33 PM

So uh... 3GHZ plus processor... I bet that does wonders for games...

Why exactly do you need to clock it so high when everything else in your system is cheapy? I already take it your not gaming... but then you need SM3.0... so you are gaming... with a 7300GT...

Another thing, in your guide, you just say, set FSB to 430MHZ... which is probably not the best thing to do right off the bat. You might want to say move up in small 5~10 MHZ increments until it doesn't post, bump up vcore or go back to last known good settings and move up in 1~2 MHZ increments...

It's a decent system for a decent price... but all you have is an oversized engine with plastic spinning rims, small tires, huge spoiler, and a loud exhaust.
October 19, 2006 2:43:19 PM

Funny thing is, I just built a rig with the same CPU and mobo. BUT I did get much better RAM, PSU, GFX card, HDD, and aftermarket cooling. Which means that I have the supporting components to hit 3 ghz and have a very respectable system.

I think his point is that he's got a fast system on the cheap. That's all. Don't read too much into it. For the price, you can't really knock it.

If people want to nitpick, then sure you can pick a different GFX card. Sure you can get different RAM. HDD, cooler, blah, blah. There are countless combinations. So what? The point is that the general guts of his build prove that people can build a decent C2D rig on the cheap.

And keep in mind, 98% of the population are not "enthusiasts" and would be more than happy with even less than what he shows. Depending on someone's budget, they could drop an extra $150 by getting better PSU and GFX card and that is still one helluva deal.

There's always a sliding scale as to how much extra to spend, and what you get for that price. It's up to each person to customize their build and move that scale around to find what they're happy with. And that's I think what's being shown here.

One person says "One can never have enough HDD's"....I may think 1.8 Tb's of storage is asinine. So what? Someone may think I wasted $$ on a 7900 GTO. So what? The point is that if that person is satisfied with their build and actually got some great performance for their $$ investment, then that's what matters.
October 19, 2006 3:00:29 PM

For the $$$ you paid you got a pretty good system
October 19, 2006 3:22:56 PM

I have to say that is a great system for the money although i would fork over another $100 to get a better gfx card
October 19, 2006 3:59:11 PM

Quote:
The DS3 uses all Solid capacitors while the S3 uses electrolytic ones that tend to last up to 5 times less than the solid ones. The life expentancy is of course lowered with OCing since it puts such a high load on the motherboard. RAID support is added for the futureproof ability of the motheboard. Seems like Gigabyte really went cheap on it...
While the Abit AB9 is only $15 more than the S3 and it DOES use this type of capacitors. Its got RAID support. The S3 has a FSB top of 500Mhz while the AB9 has a top of 600Mhz.
For the above reasons is why wusy didnt suggest it on its C2D OCing guide.


The S3's highest FSB is 600MHz, that's even on my mobo's manual, and I even double checked it in my bios. There is someone in one of the Singapore forum, achieved a 570MHz FSB on a S3, on a E6300, but of course with much better power supply, and cooling, and casing. For the capacitors, I made a phone call to my local Gigabyte supplier, and was told the difference in the capacitor isn't going to make a huge difference. This motherboard was designed to be an overclocker, the S3 would last at least 5-6 years, if running on a 24/7 daily basis. Unless if you're planning to have your computer switched on for 24/7 for the next 5-6 years, this motherboard isn't going to fail for at least 5 years, and Gigabyte's representative talking to me on the phone emphasized on their seriousness in quality control. Besides, even if your motherboard can last 5 years, that doesn't mean your other parts are going to, including your HDD, Graphic Cards, CPU, etc, some might break down before your motherboard does, and in 5 years time, these parts might go obsolete, replaced with newer technology. By then, the $631 you've just spent on your system today would have definitely served to VERY well, and it would be time to move on with better money spendings.

Another point would be RAID being future proof, and come at a cost (RAID mobo costs more, more HDD costs more), but if you're on budget, you can't be going for the best of everything. At the time being, non-RAID will suffice. In real world/economics, there's always a trade-off.

Wusy didn't suggest this motherboard, because his guide and mine are totally different. His was there to achieve highest overclock, without considering budget. Mine, would be to go as cheap as possible, and for the best system for the price. There is a difference in spending $2000 to get a 5GHz system, and a $600 for getting a 3GHz.

Quote:
This PQI stick not only is $33 less but it uses the same Micron D9GCT chips as Corsair, therefore WILL perform the same. They run at 1.8v at the advertised specs, newegg got it wrong. Dual-channel has prooven a 3-5% improoving in real life apps so no worries about that.
By the way, here you stated that youre running them at 2.1v, now youre saying 1.9v?


For this point, I can't argue, you're quite right. Corsair has their RAM being sold for higher price. But I mentioned, this is the only low latency modules available at my local store, and have proven to my own experience to work perfectly with my setup. Other RAM modules might work better at a lower price, but I can't guarantee that they're going to achieve as well of an outcome as the combination I'm having. Again, I'd have to admit, I'm not perfect. At 3GHz setting, my RAM was indeed running at 1.9V stable. I had it set at 2.1V earlier to hit my maximum potential, which I'm now running at 3.367GHz solid rock stable, will attempt lower it down to see if I can run lower Vdimm stable, as soon as I have time to do a MemTest. These torture tests do take a lot of time, and I've spent countless hours reaching a satisfactory overclocking speed. Regarding the other thread that you just linked to from your reply is totally irrelevant to this thread, as that thread is totally experimental of what I'm doing (and going to do) and is not final, whereas this thread is results proven to work.

Just for your reference, this is what I had on my other thread, that you were talking about, the 2.1V Vdimm, was set for my 3.367GHz setup (481MHz FSB), not for this thread's setting of 3.01GHz.
Quote:
Vdimm at 2.1V.
Vcore at 2.2875V
FSB at 481MHz (3.367GHz)
Idle: 45C
Load: 59C (9 hours Prime95 so far no problem, still running)


The above settings are still temporary, can't be declared as my final settings, as I might decide to overclock higher, or try to lower voltages of Vcore and Vdimm to check if they could go stable at lower ratings. I've just called up my local store, and they have just received the Mushkin 2x 1GB 4-4-3-10 DDR2-800. The price of course, are much more expensive, at $340, but could ensure that I go close to 3.5GHz, or even higher. Since the store is 2 miles away from where I stay, and I've spent quite some time there over the past 3-4 days, discussing stuffs, and buying computer parts, I might just drop by tomorrow and look at it. I might not be able to afford it anytime soon, but even if I can afford it, would I spend that extra money for that kind of performance is another question to be answered.

Quote:
Considering that newegg just recently stocked a Leadtek 7300GT 128mb DDR3, I would pick the X800GTO for raw performance and the 7300GT if you WILL use the SM3.0


There will be no winner over the debate of 7300GT vs X800GTO. X800GTO has better performance, but lacks SM3.0 support, and vice versa. For me, I'd rather have that extra SM3.0 support, and a slightly lower raw performance. Benchmarks have proven that the difference aren't significant, and would save you a couple bucks. A couple bucks here, and there would eventually save you tens, and potentially hundreds in your final set up. Anyway, I'd have to rephrase, both 7300GT (DDR3) and X800GTO are excellent cards for their respective price. Choose whichever suits you better. :) 

Quote:
My biggest complain with the CoolerMaster is that its got a single, very weak 12v rail. This Raidmax PSU, uses the same hardware as Antec, its got more power and a stronger 12v rail. Cheaper, better, blue.


The CoolerMaster PSU's aren't the best PSU around, but they're considerably cheaper, and at least, we can trust them better than a generic brand. If you find a better PSU for a better price, go ahead with it. :) 

Quote:
I not flaming completly your setup, but you shouldnt recommend something based on only your experience. There are better things in the market that might be more suitable for other users. Youve got a good setup, no doubt about that, but im just trying to make it better Wink


The reason I'm recommending something based on my experience is, because it's proven to work. Other setups/combination might not be able to get you this results, or might even get better results. It's risk taken, and luck. My recommendation is 100% proven to achieve at least 3GHz with $631 spent. Like what you've recommended over the RAM and the PSU, and stuffs, you might be able to get a similar setup for only $600. If you do, congratulations. But if you don't, I can't be the one to be blamed, as there are no 2 different product in the market the are 100% similar, there is always a difference, whether significant or not.
October 19, 2006 4:29:08 PM

Now I'm wondering what kind of generic case you had that allowed you to install all those fans... and what CFM those fans had? What would happen if you swapped every 80mm fan with a Vantec Tornado and the 12CM fan with a Silverstone FM121?

http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1075792

Some of the rankings there are. Some of them are real nice.

We do know that a system depends more than just on the processor. Not to mention most of the people on these forums aren't the average consumer. 98% of the population aren't enthusiasts, but 98% of the population here are.

Its a nice guide to show how to get a very good OC on a good processor, but the rig as a whole... is mediocre at best. All he's doing is removing one bottleneck, and then it'll hit the next one. It's a great budget build, but in the end, its still a budget build. I just don't want to mislead people who want to game at high resolutions into buying this build.

And the 1.8TB I spent on storage is all from Black Friday deals. 200 gig HDD's for 40 bucks, 300 gigs for around 60, and the 400 gig didn't even touch 100. When I see a good deal, I jump on them. Planning on getting another 2 320 gigs later, I want to hit the 5 TB mark by the end of next year. File Server FTW!
October 19, 2006 4:55:54 PM

If you can get HDD's for that price, all the power to ya, great deal! :D 

As for the OP's build.......he makes it extremely clear it is a budget build, I doubt people would be confused. So for what it is meant to be, it is one helluva deal.

Great thing is, add a better vid card, some better RAM, and an air cooler, and all of a sudden the system is no budget slouch. Drop in a good vid card and this baby will hum at high rez ;) 


Great stuff Wiz! Thanks for the info!
October 19, 2006 5:00:28 PM

Quote:
Now I'm wondering what kind of generic case you had that allowed you to install all those fans... and what CFM those fans had? What would happen if you swapped every 80mm fan with a Vantec Tornado and the 12CM fan with a Silverstone FM121?


I have the pictures taken on my digital camera, but I can't upload it now, because I lost my CF card reader. :( 

My generic casing has:

- A 8cm slot at the rear below the PSU.
- A 12cm slot at the front, right in front of the HDD slots.
- A 8cm slot on the side panel, that blows directly towards the CPU.
- Right below the 8cm slot on the side panel, there's a ventilation hole measuring 15cm x 9cm. It's not meant for any fans, but what I did was, attached 2x 8cm fans over the ventilation holes, using 3M double sided tape in between the fan and the side panel to make sure that there isn't any vibrations between the fans and the side panel, while I used nylon-bands to strap the fans against the ventilation holes, to ensure they won't fall off.

I will try to get a CF card reader from my local store tomorrow when I visit them to look at the Mushkin modules. I'll see if I'm able to borrow one, or buy a cheap one. And yes, I'm cheapskate, coz I'm a student, who's paying for my own expenses. :(  Every cent/dollar counts ... :p 

Those fans that I'm running are generic brand fans too, budget stuffs. :p  If you're gonna toss in more money for better fans, the results, would definitely be better.

Quote:
If you can get HDD's for that price, all the power to ya, great deal! Very Happy


Hehehe ... that's the good thing when you shop at local store instead of online. All you do is, print out all the lowest priced items you find on the internet, bring it to the shop, nagotiate with them. Especially since you're gonna buy almost everything from them, they're most likely gonna give you a cheaper deal. That's one thing you can't do buying online, nagotiate.

Besides, the other good thing about buying at local stores is that ... if the item I purchased is still within warranty period, and with my invoice, I can go back to my local store, and they'll handle the warranty and deal with the manufacturer/supplier. In that case, I'll save more money on shipping if one of my parts break down.

Now, the one good thing here is, my Seagate is given to me with a 5 year warranty, within 1 year, I'll get a 1-to-1 replacement. The reason I get this is because, when we agreed initially to purchase a WD HDD, then we finalized our deal, and all of a sudden, he was looking over his stock, and found out that they're out of WD 160GB's. I was reluctant to take the Seagate as an offer, but he explained, Seagate has 5 year manufacturer's warranty, whereas Western Digital offers only 3 years. In the end, he tossed in a deal, a 1 year 1-to-1 replacement deal for free. That's a deal I couldn't resist.

Give me a couple minutes, then check back on my #1 post, I'll post a copy of my scanned invoice there. :D 
October 19, 2006 5:28:10 PM

Couldn't agree with you more Skyguy. To the OP, good job, it suits your needs I gather? Then no problem you did well for the price.

Some of the things pointed out as better choices make some sense but not everyone scans half a dozen or more hardware vendors daily for price comparison like I do. Yes I'm sadly addicted to tech, it is to me what a skin mag is to a perv lol.

I can only assume the 7300GT fit into your budget and you chose it as you said for SM 3.0. I also, rather than "correcting you" on your choice, assume that its a good enough for now card which you may upgrade in the future? Waiting on DX10 perhaps? Also smart move if thats your intent.

Try to take other peoples comments as being as "constructive" as you can and don't worry about anyone saying you did anything "wrong" with your build. There is no template for a build that applies to everyone. We all have diff needs, desires from out hardware and, for some, branding can come into play. At the end of the day if you are happy with what you created then more power to you bud ! :) 
October 19, 2006 5:45:51 PM

Great thread, Wiz83, i really appreciate it!

I was planning on building a new computer around November, December. I want cheap. I want fast. This guide pretty much wraps it up. Well, at least the basics. I´ll probably go with a better GPU and a Xeon 3040 instead, but what you mentioned still applies. So thanks for sharing. :D 
October 19, 2006 6:01:56 PM

Quote:
I can only assume the 7300GT fit into your budget and you chose it as you said for SM 3.0. I also, rather than "correcting you" on your choice, assume that its a good enough for now card which you may upgrade in the future? Waiting on DX10 perhaps? Also smart move if thats your intent.


Yeps, staying on a lower priced card now is a good move for now. And of course I will upgrade to a DX10 compatible card, IF I have the money to do so. :p  Thanks for pointing that out. :D 

Quote:
Great thread, Wiz83, i really appreciate it!

I was planning on building a new computer around November, December. I want cheap. I want fast. This guide pretty much wraps it up. Well, at least the basics. I´ll probably go with a better GPU and a Xeon 3040 instead, but what you mentioned still applies. So thanks for sharing. Very Happy


It's my pleasure. :)  As I've said before, on my other thread, that I came, I sought help, and now, time to contribute to this community. I'm here to stay for a long term basis (hopefully :p ) ... :D 

My setup is pretty strong, processor wise, but the graphic is on the limiting side. For gaming purposes, just swap the card with a much better one, which costs more ... the rest can remain the same ... you don't have to follow the list 100% ... there's always flexibility, you choose what you suits you best, and does the job ...
October 19, 2006 6:08:38 PM

Nice thread wiz83!!! I was saving money for the 6600 conroe. But now I am thinking it over because of you!!!!

Everybody complains about quality psu, but 2-3 years ago everyone just had a generic psu. If a psu works, it works period. Doesn't make a difference if it
is worth 150$ or 30$.

I am more afraid of ups than psu. (i had one fried my m/b once!!!)

I will try to do some maths with the 6400 + m/b + ddr2 + gfx pcix. I have all else!!!

I wanted to ask something. Does the stock fan of the intel cooler makes hell of a noise? and how many rpm at full load? Is it bearable?
In my prescott it did 5000 rpm and woke up the neighboors! )I had it replaced with an artic freezer.)

Otherwise add 30$ to your pc-build for a silent fan/heatsink as I can't imagine anyone want a noisy one.
October 19, 2006 6:47:43 PM

The stock intel fan isin't too loud, the case fans seem to me to cause bigger sound issues.

Eh, scholarships + work tide me over through my college life. I got offered a full-ride at UH (University of Houston) but I decided to go to UT Austin since they offered me 7k a year, costing me only about 8k to go to school there. Not bad at all.

I used to work at Directron.com, which gives me anything I want at cost, even more so since my parents are family friends with the owners there. Building computers there all day was fun too, worked there for a whole summer, lost count of the number of computers I did... somewhere in the high hundreds. Payed decently too, so money never is too much of a problem for me. Damn gas prices though... growl
October 19, 2006 7:00:28 PM

Quote:
Nice thread wiz83!!! I was saving money for the 6600 conroe. But now I am thinking it over because of you!!!!

Everybody complains about quality psu, but 2-3 years ago everyone just had a generic psu. If a psu works, it works period. Doesn't make a difference if it
is worth 150$ or 30$.

I am more afraid of ups than psu. (i had one fried my m/b once!!!)

I will try to do some maths with the 6400 + m/b + ddr2 + gfx pcix. I have all else!!!

I wanted to ask something. Does the stock fan of the intel cooler makes hell of a noise? and how many rpm at full load? Is it bearable?
In my prescott it did 5000 rpm and woke up the neighboors! )I had it replaced with an artic freezer.)

Otherwise add 30$ to your pc-build for a silent fan/heatsink as I can't imagine anyone want a noisy one.


Great to actually know that you're re-considering saving money because of me. :p 

Anyway, the stock HSF with Smart Fan Control setting was completely noiseless ... I was quite surprised ... but when I turned off the Smart Fan Control, my motherboard reads it at 1800+RPM, whether it's accurate or not, I seriously don't know as I can't measure RPM of fans with my eyes. :p  Even at that speed, the CPU fan was quite quiet indeed, it's acceptable. This is one of the stock HSF that produces the least noise. In fact, the 5x generic casing fans are actually making more noise than my HSF. Although the HSF isn't the heat-pipe version like the X2's, it's doing quite a good job for me at the moment.
October 19, 2006 9:34:40 PM

Quote:
The reason I'm recommending something based on my experience is, because it's proven to work.

Then it should be called a report, not a guide.
Unless you consider widening the shopping list a bit to fit more requirements.
October 20, 2006 4:46:05 AM

Quote:
So uh... 3GHZ plus processor... I bet that does wonders for games...

Why exactly do you need to clock it so high when everything else in your system is cheapy? I already take it your not gaming... but then you need SM3.0... so you are gaming... with a 7300GT...

Another thing, in your guide, you just say, set FSB to 430MHZ... which is probably not the best thing to do right off the bat. You might want to say move up in small 5~10 MHZ increments until it doesn't post, bump up vcore or go back to last known good settings and move up in 1~2 MHZ increments...

It's a decent system for a decent price... but all you have is an oversized engine with plastic spinning rims, small tires, huge spoiler, and a loud exhaust.

Oh come on, give this guy a break, not everybody is a maniac gamer, I will also buy a good cpu with a low-end video card. why should I buy an expensive card when I play just starcraft and homeworld 2? however, that powerfull cpu will really help me in my work.
October 20, 2006 10:27:38 AM

Quote:
The reason I'm recommending something based on my experience is, because it's proven to work.

Then it should be called a report, not a guide.
Unless you consider widening the shopping list a bit to fit more requirements.

A report is to show what I've achieved, and prove that it works.

A guide, is something I'm RECOMMENDING others to do. Recommending means, doesn't have to follow completely. But if you do, you're guaranteed to achieve at least 3GHz. Guess what? I've achieved 3.5GHz this morning, but at a full load temperature of 66C, which I'm worried, and I tweaked it down to 3.367GHz which I've had proven to work below 60C, just so that I'm 100% safe below Intel's specified max temperature of 61.2C. And if I had a better HSF, I wouldn't have that problem, but if I do, it'd cost my overall system much more money, which is why I'm not doing so.

I read a guide on THG regarding the 4GHz PD805 for $730, but that was a couple months ago. That thing THG was recommending was actually claimed as a GUIDE. Now, the reason I wrote this guide is because, I sought help here on my other thread, and achieved my highest possible clock, which I might not be able to achieve without other's helps, so I thought I could contribute back to the community, help more people, save money, get a great system. If you want to criticize my thread, why not criticize THG's guide to the 4GHz PD for $730? My system is cheaper than that system, and yet, using a better graphics card, but then, that thing was published in May, mine just 2 days ago. Furthermore, SharkyExtreme.com has a monthly GUIDE on High-end PC Buyer's Guide, and even Value PC Buyer's Guide. I've compared my price to that of Value PC Buyer's Guide, and even THG's 4GHz rig, without the LCD, I/O devices, etc. My system is cheaper, and would definitely outperform theirs, and even overclock much better.

And again, when I wanted to build a value system, I read about:
- WOW E6300 CAN OVERCLOCK ABOVE 3GHZ
- THIS MOTHERBOARD IS GREAT OVERCLOCKER FOR C2D
- THIS RAM WORKS GREAT ABOVE XXXMHz

Everyone elses' setup is different, but there isn't one guide/thread/report that explained to everyone, how much it costs, and every single component, and how to achieve that setup.

Even Wussy's guide, which was very helpful, taught a lot how to overclock, didn't gave a full spec of a system, and to setup something to fit the budget system, and proven to work above 3GHz. In fact, I read quite a lot of people who actually followed that guide, failed to hit above 2.8GHz.

IF, before I built this setup, I had such a thread around to help me, life would have been so much easier for me to choose my components. From this base guide, I could decide to go with maybe other better and cheaper PSU, Graphics Card, etc.

I hope I do make sense here, that's all for today. :) 
October 20, 2006 5:17:45 PM

Quote:
Any part that's part of my recommendation concerns only performance/$ and that only.
Learn it well.


Of course, overclocking is to increase the performance/$. :) 
October 20, 2006 5:23:08 PM

Smart man Wiz.......your arguments (or should I just simply call them FACTS??!!) are bang-on. Perhaps some people are jealous they dropped $2000 on a rig than could be approximated in real world stuff by your specs (plus a good vid card). Whatever..........In any case, your Guide is extremely helpful to most people, save for the select few that are militant about their systems, specs, and performance numbers. There will always be those types of people.

In any event, this provides accurate information to people who are not experts, is very helpful and written very clearly. My only emphasis on this is what you've already stated: That each system responds differently; therefore this is a Guide that people will need to tweak according to their own system. For example, your voltage suggestions are not stable on my setup. But when I boost them a bit on the CPU, it is then stable. Great, success!!! And that's the point, your Guide helped me get more performance out of my system and saved me time as well.

So, thank you for your Guide and info, I can't speak for anyone else, but I've learned alot from it.
October 20, 2006 8:14:00 PM

Quote:
Smart man Wiz.......your arguments (or should I just simply call them FACTS??!!) are bang-on. Perhaps some people are jealous they dropped $2000 on a rig than could be approximated in real world stuff by your specs (plus a good vid card). Whatever..........In any case, your Guide is extremely helpful to most people, save for the select few that are militant about their systems, specs, and performance numbers. There will always be those types of people.

In any event, this provides accurate information to people who are not experts, is very helpful and written very clearly. My only emphasis on this is what you've already stated: That each system responds differently; therefore this is a Guide that people will need to tweak according to their own system. For example, your voltage suggestions are not stable on my setup. But when I boost them a bit on the CPU, it is then stable. Great, success!!! And that's the point, your Guide helped me get more performance out of my system and saved me time as well.

So, thank you for your Guide and info, I can't speak for anyone else, but I've learned alot from it.


Thanks for your compliment. I'll add a line before the tweaking steps noting that each system will react differently. :) 
October 20, 2006 8:14:48 PM

Quote:
Any part that's part of my recommendation concerns only performance/$ and that only.
Learn it well.


This guy has shut his ears. Theres no improoving this thread.
a b K Overclocking
October 20, 2006 9:01:27 PM

good build
October 20, 2006 9:17:27 PM

I've done everything I can to improve it. In fact I've just made a lot of changes to my #1 post. Take a look at it and give comments. :) 
October 20, 2006 9:25:32 PM

Excellent changes, thank you. You might wanna know why ive been so pushy on this thread? Its because I believe this guide can help alot of ppl. It just needed some polishing :D 
October 20, 2006 9:42:15 PM

Quote:
Excellent changes, thank you. You might wanna know why ive been so pushy on this thread? Its because I believe this guide can help alot of ppl. It just needed some polishing :D 


I guess I'd have to thank you for pushing me :p 

Anyway, my uncle (dad's step-sister's husband) needed a computer for his office, as he told me he's using his 7 years old celeron. My brother told him great stories of what I've achieved on my current system. He told me he wanted to buy my computer off me for whatever price I paid for it, I told him "HELL NO, YOU'VE GOT NO IDEA HOW MUCH TIME I'VE SPENT ON THIS SYSTEM! ALTHOUGH I'M POOR AS HELL, YOU AIN'T TAKING MY DARLING OFF ME!" ... Guess what? He's offered me an extra $100 for the time I've spent on this.

Now, question is, should I part with my current darling and go back to my old OC'ed Sempron? or even build another new one? If I do, I'm gonna miss this system, coz this thing has got some sentimental value.

Please visit my other thread regarding POLL: Should I Sell It ?
October 21, 2006 9:11:28 AM

I just got off with my uncle on the phone, and he's agreed to give me $800 for everything. My whole system actually cost me $637 with the 56k modem. I'm making $163 off over the 4 days span. I've decided to sell it after reading most of the comments over the other thread. Let's hope I'd be able to get a better system next. But I won't be doing it anytime soon, as my mid-term paper is coming soon (week after next). For now I'll stick with my old overclocked Sempron, and will build a new one as soon as I got the time to do so. I will only build a new one when I have the time to spend on it, to overclock, and do lots of stability test. I've gotta admit this thing has been a distraction for me over the past 4 days as I can't lay a second off it, trying to achieve better results off it by overclocking, and doing all the tests. Now the bad thing is, I have to deliver it to his office (approximately 15 miles away from where I stay) on Monday during his working hours. I guess that's the time I'd have to say goodbye to my precious. :( 
October 21, 2006 5:56:27 PM

Hi Everyone
well we`re waiting for your benchmarks IN OC mode & NONE-OC.
which is better? 7300GT 256MB GDDR3 OR 7600GS with reference board?
maybe I recommend your system to one of my friends. that`s pretty OCable.
Anyway your made it as best it could
October 21, 2006 6:02:08 PM

I've updated the #1 post, updated it with pictures of my system. For those who are interested, check it out. :) 
October 21, 2006 6:05:30 PM

Another Question
Which Mobo do you think is better, The MB you have bought OR Abit AB9-Pro V1.00 ? ( according to the toms article about overclocking E6400 Which was unbelively OCed & beat E6700)
October 21, 2006 6:24:47 PM

Quote:
I've updated the #1 post, updated it with pictures of my system. For those who are interested, check it out. :) 


where are the pics? I CANNOT see.

I`ll be glad if you E-mail them to me
October 21, 2006 7:15:34 PM

Quote:
Another Question
Which Mobo do you think is better, The MB you have bought OR Abit AB9-Pro V1.00 ? ( according to the toms article about overclocking E6400 Which was unbelively OCed & beat E6700)


I read about ABIT AB9 being a great overclocker too, but they cost more than the Gigabyte's S3. I personally can't tell you much about the AB9 as I haven't used it before.

Quote:
where are the pics? I CANNOT see.


They're on the #1 post on the 1st page of this thread, under the section *** PICTURES ***. I've added 6 pictures (Parts, Case: Front, Case: Side (Closed), Case: Side (Opened), Case: Side Panel, and Case: Inside).
October 21, 2006 7:17:40 PM

I think it is great that you share this information, as someone will surely benefit from it.

What would you recommend for someone like myself that is not experienced in over clocking? I mean would this cpu, mb, memory be right for my system to upgrade if I do not overclock?

My system is amd64 3400, 2x 500mb pc3200 memory, sapphire x1900xt cf, ThermalTake Toughpower 700watt, alienware type case with 6 fans.

By the way, I was surprised to see 3dmark 06 results so low. My system is getting 4300, with cpu score of 853. 3dmark05 is 9400 range.

I play a lot of PC games.
October 21, 2006 7:38:56 PM

Quote:
I think it is great that you share this information, as someone will surely benefit from it.

What would you recommend for someone like myself that is not experienced in over clocking? I mean would this cpu, mb, memory be right for my system to upgrade if I do not overclock?

My system is amd64 3400, 2x 500mb pc3200 memory, sapphire x1900xt cf, ThermalTake Toughpower 700watt, alienware type case with 6 fans.

By the way, I was surprised to see 3dmark 06 results so low. My system is getting 4300, with cpu score of 853. 3dmark05 is 9400 range.

I play a lot of PC games.


The C2D's are definitely better than the Athlon64's. Even better than AthlonFX's when overclocked. If you do upgrade, you'd definitely feel an increase in processor performance. If you're not experienced with overclocking, I'd recommend you to check out wusy's Core2Duo Overclocking Guide, which is indeed very helpful for overclocking beginners.

The reason my system is scoring low results for 3DMark is because 3DMark is mostly testing your graphics card. For my case, I'm using only a decent 7300GT card, which isn't the best around, but it's a value for money budget card for below $100. You probably have a better card than mine, which costs more than the 7300GT, therefore performing better in 3DMark.

If you do play a lot of PC games, I recommend you getting a better card.
October 21, 2006 7:42:40 PM

Your GPU and the rest of your system is great, but your CPU is the weak spot. Wiz just needs to add a kick@$$ GPU and his scores will go through the roof.
October 21, 2006 9:02:21 PM

First, props on a great build and a good post.

I'll second everybody heres comment that the 7300GT isn't something to recommend since its not powerfull enough to show sm3 in all its glory. 7600gt maybe, but i'd still rather have the x800 than the 3. I'd even say this is more than just IMHO stuff, but anyway...

The one area I would completely recommend people spend a few more bucks is powersupply. Coolermaster might aswell be generic. And you don't really have to spend much more to go enermax, seasonic, fortron, etc. Plus a lot of cheapo cases are starting to come with 120mm fan mounts and those are a heck of a lot quieter than 80mm (I'm a noise freak)

The few detractors definitly missed your point (anybody who has half a brain knows onboard raid isn't that fast, and you could still get a decent raid card for your board and outperform any ich7 / etc).

I always strive for balance in my system design, and I would really only look to change those few pieces.
October 23, 2006 10:07:27 AM

This Is taken from newegg:
Quote:
This product does not support Win9X/ME
Notice: Only DDR2-800 memory supporting JEDEC approved 1.8V operation with timings of 5-5-5 or 6-6-6 is supported on Intel Desktop Boards based on Intel 965 Express Chipsets.


But you`re using DDR2 675MHz RAM at 4-4-4-12 timings. 8O 8O :?: Haven`t you any problem with ?
!