Need to boost range of wireless

Archived from groups: (More info?)

I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
connecting to the wireless network at my old house.

At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
second per the linksys utility.

It seems my options to remedy this are running cat5, a range extender,
stronger antennas, or a wireless access point. Running cable is a last
resort as it could be tough getting to the area of the bedroom that needs
the feed as it is under a the lowest point of the attic. The antennas seem a
dubious investment. Not sure if the wireless extender thing will really
work. Would the WAP do the same thing as the extender? It seems to be a
better investment as I could reconfigure it if I need to reconfigure the
network in the future.

Any ideas?

Jon
28 answers Last reply
More about need boost range wireless
  1. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 10:27:44 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
    >desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    >connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    >
    >At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    >wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    >downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    >She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    >second per the linksys utility.

    12MBits/sec will give you about 6Mbits/sec thruput. This is faster
    than the typical DSL although it may cause problems with a faster
    cable modem connection. However, I suspect that going through the
    floor of the house results in an unreliable connection, which is the
    real problem.

    >It seems my options to remedy this are running cat5, a range extender,
    >stronger antennas, or a wireless access point.

    1. Run CAT5 upstairs to the computers.
    2. Run CAT5 upstairs to a 2nd wireless access point.
    3. Setup a 2nd WRT54G and use WDS to repeat the signal. This might
    be a problem as you can't seem to go through the floor with a wireless
    client, there's no reason to suspect that it can be done with a
    repeater.
    4. Setup a wireless repeater. Same problem as #3.
    5. Use the power line to act as a link upstair and setup a repeater.
    This tends to be limited by the speed of the power line link at about
    2Mbit/sec thruput.
    http://www.netgear.com/products/details/WGXB102.php
    6. Run coax cable upstairs with a 2nd antenna. This is lossy, but if
    the cable lengths are short, it works quite well. This is what I do
    to deal with the upstairs/downstairs problem at my platial domicile.
    7. Install a directional antenna or reflector on the WRT54G and hope
    that it penetrates the floor. This is probably the cheapest and
    easiest solution. A panel, patch, or biquad antenna would probably
    work. I'm not a big fan of coffee can antennas, but if you can
    tolerate the aesthetics, that will also suffice. Also:
    http://www.freeantennas.com
    8. Move the WRT54G to somewhere near the middle of the house or at
    the base of the stairwell. Wireless goes through air much easier than
    through floors. If your floor is poured concrete, I don't think any
    form of positioning will help.

    >Running cable is a last
    >resort as it could be tough getting to the area of the bedroom that needs
    >the feed as it is under a the lowest point of the attic.

    Run it to the attic and then to over the bedroom. Install an 2nd
    access point or wireless router setup as an access point over the
    bedroom. Ceilings are usually not as heavily built as floors.

    >The antennas seem a
    >dubious investment. Not sure if the wireless extender thing will really
    >work.

    Wireless extenders, repeaters, WDS repeaters, and mesh networks all
    have a small problem. If you need high thruput, they cut your maximum
    bandwidth in half. That's probably not a problem if you just want to
    share a DSL or cable modem connection. However, your wireless to
    wireless thruput will be slow. Methinks you could live with it.
    Repeaters and extenders are also very specific as to what chipsets and
    devices they will work with. The newsgroups are full of disappointed
    users that discover their new wireless repeater doesn't work with
    their access point or wireless router. WDS is more of the same, but
    you already have half the puzzle. The WRT54G with Sveasoft Alchemy
    replacment firmware supports WDS. Buy a 2nd WRT54G to act as a WDS
    repeater. You can also plug client computahs into the 2nd WRT54G and
    it will act as a bridge to the first. If you have good connectivity
    between WRT54G boxes, this is probably the most vesatile and useful
    arrangment. Unfortunately, it's also the most expensive and
    complicated to setup.

    >Would the WAP do the same thing as the extender?

    A WAP (wireless access point) can be wired with CAT5 to the first
    WRT54G and supply coverage upstairs. You can also use a wireless
    router as an access point by ignoring the WAN port and router section.
    You'll find that wireless routers are also cheaper than WAP's. Unlike
    the extender or repeater, the CAT5 connection is fast, stable,
    interference free, and always works. A 2nd WRT54G would do the job or
    just about any wireless device.

    >It seems to be a
    >better investment as I could reconfigure it if I need to reconfigure the
    >network in the future.

    Your decision. I would play with location and antennas first. Then
    decide on the more expensive alternatives if that fails.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    AE6KS 831-336-2558
  2. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    >wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    >downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    >She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    >second per the linksys utility.

    Does it work OK? If you are sharing a typical 1.5MB internet
    connection, it may not matter how fast you are connecting to your
    LAN...

    I'd look at moving the router to (or installing an AP in) a more
    central location.
  3. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I moved the router about 15 feet down the wall from my desktop, which is in
    the corner. The signal went from little or no connection to a low power,
    'throughput most of the time' connection.

    It does get about 1.5 MB sec most of the time, but was hoping to improve
    that. My laptop gets 3.5 MB/sec on the wireless card using an online speed
    test. My hardwired Comcast connection at my desktop gives me a solid 6mb/sec
    from the same site.

    If I used an AP would I be better off using a WAP or a signal extender?

    Thanks,
    Jon

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:ucibh11o2bp3gniq5onf82dh6d8hcb11mn@4ax.com...
    > "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > >wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > >downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    > >She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB
    a
    > >second per the linksys utility.
    >
    > Does it work OK? If you are sharing a typical 1.5MB internet
    > connection, it may not matter how fast you are connecting to your
    > LAN...
    >
    > I'd look at moving the router to (or installing an AP in) a more
    > central location.
  4. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Zeppo wrote:

    > I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
    > desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    > connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    >
    > At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    > She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    > second per the linksys utility.

    And that's a problem? You can't make use of all that bandwidth on the
    Internet, anyway.
    --
    derek
  5. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    The spot in the bedroom where the desktop sits resides over the garage,
    which has masonry walls. This is probably help block the signal. I get the
    same reception on my laptop if I use it near the wife's desktop but the
    signal gets real strong near the door to the bedroom.

    Just had a thought... Could I connect a coax cable to the back of the PCI
    card and run it along the wall to the opposite corner of the bedroom and
    connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot of
    signal loss through the cable?

    Jon

    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:2llbh1t8io79rbt72c5tmuhob2oiplf34f@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 10:27:44 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had
    a
    > >desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    > >connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    > >
    > >At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > >wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > >downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    > >She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB
    a
    > >second per the linksys utility.
    >
    > 12MBits/sec will give you about 6Mbits/sec thruput. This is faster
    > than the typical DSL although it may cause problems with a faster
    > cable modem connection. However, I suspect that going through the
    > floor of the house results in an unreliable connection, which is the
    > real problem.
    >
    > >It seems my options to remedy this are running cat5, a range extender,
    > >stronger antennas, or a wireless access point.
    >
    > 1. Run CAT5 upstairs to the computers.
    > 2. Run CAT5 upstairs to a 2nd wireless access point.
    > 3. Setup a 2nd WRT54G and use WDS to repeat the signal. This might
    > be a problem as you can't seem to go through the floor with a wireless
    > client, there's no reason to suspect that it can be done with a
    > repeater.
    > 4. Setup a wireless repeater. Same problem as #3.
    > 5. Use the power line to act as a link upstair and setup a repeater.
    > This tends to be limited by the speed of the power line link at about
    > 2Mbit/sec thruput.
    > http://www.netgear.com/products/details/WGXB102.php
    > 6. Run coax cable upstairs with a 2nd antenna. This is lossy, but if
    > the cable lengths are short, it works quite well. This is what I do
    > to deal with the upstairs/downstairs problem at my platial domicile.
    > 7. Install a directional antenna or reflector on the WRT54G and hope
    > that it penetrates the floor. This is probably the cheapest and
    > easiest solution. A panel, patch, or biquad antenna would probably
    > work. I'm not a big fan of coffee can antennas, but if you can
    > tolerate the aesthetics, that will also suffice. Also:
    > http://www.freeantennas.com
    > 8. Move the WRT54G to somewhere near the middle of the house or at
    > the base of the stairwell. Wireless goes through air much easier than
    > through floors. If your floor is poured concrete, I don't think any
    > form of positioning will help.
    >
    > >Running cable is a last
    > >resort as it could be tough getting to the area of the bedroom that needs
    > >the feed as it is under a the lowest point of the attic.
    >
    > Run it to the attic and then to over the bedroom. Install an 2nd
    > access point or wireless router setup as an access point over the
    > bedroom. Ceilings are usually not as heavily built as floors.
    >
    > >The antennas seem a
    > >dubious investment. Not sure if the wireless extender thing will really
    > >work.
    >
    > Wireless extenders, repeaters, WDS repeaters, and mesh networks all
    > have a small problem. If you need high thruput, they cut your maximum
    > bandwidth in half. That's probably not a problem if you just want to
    > share a DSL or cable modem connection. However, your wireless to
    > wireless thruput will be slow. Methinks you could live with it.
    > Repeaters and extenders are also very specific as to what chipsets and
    > devices they will work with. The newsgroups are full of disappointed
    > users that discover their new wireless repeater doesn't work with
    > their access point or wireless router. WDS is more of the same, but
    > you already have half the puzzle. The WRT54G with Sveasoft Alchemy
    > replacment firmware supports WDS. Buy a 2nd WRT54G to act as a WDS
    > repeater. You can also plug client computahs into the 2nd WRT54G and
    > it will act as a bridge to the first. If you have good connectivity
    > between WRT54G boxes, this is probably the most vesatile and useful
    > arrangment. Unfortunately, it's also the most expensive and
    > complicated to setup.
    >
    > >Would the WAP do the same thing as the extender?
    >
    > A WAP (wireless access point) can be wired with CAT5 to the first
    > WRT54G and supply coverage upstairs. You can also use a wireless
    > router as an access point by ignoring the WAN port and router section.
    > You'll find that wireless routers are also cheaper than WAP's. Unlike
    > the extender or repeater, the CAT5 connection is fast, stable,
    > interference free, and always works. A 2nd WRT54G would do the job or
    > just about any wireless device.
    >
    > >It seems to be a
    > >better investment as I could reconfigure it if I need to reconfigure the
    > >network in the future.
    >
    > Your decision. I would play with location and antennas first. Then
    > decide on the more expensive alternatives if that fails.
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > AE6KS 831-336-2558
  6. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 13:08:27 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >Just had a thought... Could I connect a coax cable to the back of the PCI
    >card and run it along the wall to the opposite corner of the bedroom and
    >connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot of
    >signal loss through the cable?

    No. Far too much loss over the distance. Also, if you can run coax,
    you can also run CAT5 cable.

    However PCI card radios have their antennas located in the worst
    possible place. It's behind a metal shield (computer case), near the
    floor, and in the middle of a tangle of cables behind the machine. An
    external panel, patch, or biquad antenna close to the desktop might
    help. They usually come with < 3ft of coax which is tolerable.



    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  7. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    The problem is the signal is flakey there. It fluctuates and stalls
    occasionally. Maybe I am being unrealistic about how much I can improve it
    though.

    Jon

    "Derek Broughton" <news@pointerstop.ca> wrote in message
    news:2i0hu2-qt9.ln1@othello.pointerstop.ca...
    > Zeppo wrote:
    >
    > > I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had
    a
    > > desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    > > connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    > >
    > > At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > > wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > > downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the
    house.
    > > She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB
    a
    > > second per the linksys utility.
    >
    > And that's a problem? You can't make use of all that bandwidth on the
    > Internet, anyway.
    > --
    > derek
  8. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >I moved the router about 15 feet down the wall from my desktop, which is in
    >the corner. The signal went from little or no connection to a low power,
    >'throughput most of the time' connection.

    Can you run a wire to somewhere in the middle of the first floor,
    maybe to a closet? That'd probably give you the best results...

    >If I used an AP would I be better off using a WAP or a signal extender?

    Well, if you could get it to work, a repeater would (cut your maximum
    bandwidth in half and) not require running any wires, but the one time
    I tried it (with D-Link products) I was completely unsuccessful and
    had to run separate wires to the individual APs.

    I'd use a Linksys WAP54G in a central location.
  9. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Zeppo <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
    > desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    > connecting to the wireless network at my old house.

    > At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    > She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    > second per the linksys utility.

    If you have a low signal, a reflector will likely fix the problem.

    http://www.freeantennas.com EZ-12, printed on photo paper for thick stock,
    with aluminum foil glued to the sail, provides a substantial boost in
    signal. http://www.rahul.net/dold/clarence/EZ12-windsurfer.jpg

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
  10. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    OK, I need to try this, if just for the novelty value of the idea. :-)

    Do I use this on the router antennae, or the desktop's PCI card antenna (or
    both)? If used on the router, do I need one for each antenna or just use it
    on one?

    Thanks,
    Jon


    <dold@XReXXNeedX.usenet.us.com> wrote in message
    news:df4g1l$mbe$1@blue.rahul.net...
    > Zeppo <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > > I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had
    a
    > > desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    > > connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    >
    > > At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    > > wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    > > downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the
    house.
    > > She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB
    a
    > > second per the linksys utility.
    >
    > If you have a low signal, a reflector will likely fix the problem.
    >
    > http://www.freeantennas.com EZ-12, printed on photo paper for thick
    stock,
    > with aluminum foil glued to the sail, provides a substantial boost in
    > signal. http://www.rahul.net/dold/clarence/EZ12-windsurfer.jpg
    >
    > ---
    > Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
    >
  11. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Zeppo <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > OK, I need to try this, if just for the novelty value of the idea. :-)

    > Do I use this on the router antennae, or the desktop's PCI card antenna (or
    > both)? If used on the router, do I need one for each antenna or just use it
    > on one?

    Three.
    Putting it on the PCI antenna will help.
    Putting it on one of the WAP antennas will help, but I found that if both
    antennas have signal, my SMC7004WFW would toggle back and forth between the
    good signal and the poor signal.

    http://www.rahul.net/dold/clarence/windsurfer-dining.JPG The signal with
    the reflector is not only 13dB stronger, it's more stable.


    PCI antennas are often blocked by the PC itself. Is your PC facing in the
    right direction? If there's an upstairs downstairs angle, you might want
    the antennas at matching angles, so they are "broadside" to each other.


    With 54g connections, I find that watching the "current bandwidth" in the
    Windows perfmon.msc is a pretty good signal indicator.
    start-run-perfmon.msc
    + Performance Object = Network
    Numbers agree with dslreports.
    + Performance Object = TCP "current bandwidth"

    You can watch the throughput while copying locally as well as from the
    internet. The internet link is the slow link, but I found that a WiFi link
    that is low and fluctuating while you are observing it is likely hanging
    from time to time due to poor signal, or other interactions and
    interference in the house that varies with time.

    On one PCI card, I added a "Hawking HAI6SDA Directional 6dBi 2.4GHz Antenna"
    http://www.hawkingtech.com/prodSpec.php?ProdID=143


    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
  12. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in. Running
    cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.

    I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a Dell.
    I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    shielding.

    Thanks for all the interesting discussion.
    Regards,
    Jon


    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:q5tbh15v3tgiuovormrg43ka9e24i9fi9i@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 13:08:27 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Just had a thought... Could I connect a coax cable to the back of the PCI
    > >card and run it along the wall to the opposite corner of the bedroom and
    > >connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot of
    > >signal loss through the cable?
    >
    > No. Far too much loss over the distance. Also, if you can run coax,
    > you can also run CAT5 cable.
    >
    > However PCI card radios have their antennas located in the worst
    > possible place. It's behind a metal shield (computer case), near the
    > floor, and in the middle of a tangle of cables behind the machine. An
    > external panel, patch, or biquad antenna close to the desktop might
    > help. They usually come with < 3ft of coax which is tolerable.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  13. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot of
    > signal loss through the cable?

    Depends on the cable. You're more likely to lose as much as you'd gain.
    A reflector or better antenna in the same location on a short cable is
    likely to work better.

    David.
  14. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I'm going to give that a try. I'll report back with results.

    Thanks,
    Jon

    "David Taylor" <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d7ffe3f15c7703d989de6@news.cable.ntlworld.com...
    > > connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot
    of
    > > signal loss through the cable?
    >
    > Depends on the cable. You're more likely to lose as much as you'd gain.
    > A reflector or better antenna in the same location on a short cable is
    > likely to work better.
    >
    > David.
  15. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in. Running
    >cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.

    You can run coax... but not very far unless you buy some *very*
    good coax (which is about 1/2" or more diameter).

    But one other possibility that hasn't been mentioned is to put
    in a WRT54G and use it in client mode. Then you don't need to
    run coax, but instead can place the WRT54G at some location
    where the signal is good enough, and run CAT5 to the computer
    (use one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port). I don't remember
    if the Linksys firmware has client mode or if you need to
    install third party firmware, but that makes little difference
    because you'd want the third party firmware anyway.

    Along the same lines, a lot of people have used USB wireless
    clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    length.

    >I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    >works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a Dell.
    >I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    >shielding.

    Even just moving it a foot or so up above the computer case
    should have a dramatic effect. However, since you say the
    laptop doesn't get a good signal there either, it probably won't
    be enough. Certainly worth trying though.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd@apaflo.com
  16. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:q5tbh15v3tgiuovormrg43ka9e24i9fi9i@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 13:08:27 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Just had a thought... Could I connect a coax cable to the back of the PCI
    >>card and run it along the wall to the opposite corner of the bedroom and
    >>connect the antenna and the other end near the door? Would I get a lot of
    >>signal loss through the cable?
    >
    > No. Far too much loss over the distance. Also, if you can run coax,
    > you can also run CAT5 cable.
    >
    > However PCI card radios have their antennas located in the worst
    > possible place. It's behind a metal shield (computer case), near the
    > floor, and in the middle of a tangle of cables behind the machine. An
    > external panel, patch, or biquad antenna close to the desktop might
    > help. They usually come with < 3ft of coax which is tolerable.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

    I solved my wireless range problem yesterday. I'm 500' from the WRT54g
    located in the main building. There are steel containers (the ones used for
    overseas shipping) stacked 2 high and 3 deep between my office and the
    router. Netstumbler could "see" the router but the signal was nowhere near
    enough to connect. So I went to BestBuy to purchase an outdoor antenna.
    There is no such device at my BestBuy. The geek squad guy says get these
    7db gain Linksys antennas to replace on the router, and if they don't help
    just bring them back. ok. I also saw a Linksys PCI card with SRX. (I have
    a desktop in the outbuilding and was trying to use my USB-G adapter that I
    use with my 3 year old laptop) So I bought one of them also. Went from
    a -89db signal to -60db and can connect now.

    alien
  17. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 17:30:42 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in. Running
    >cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.

    A brand new house and nobody thought to run CAT5 and other cable? I'm
    playing advisor to a homebuilder that want his houses ready for just
    about anything electronic that might be needed. I convinced him to
    run conduit instead of cable (it's cheaper) in the walls and let the
    buyers decide on what's needed. He ran 3/4 blue FNT "smurf tube" and
    the first few buyers are complaining that it's difficult to cram in
    RG-6/u (satellite and CATV), 3 CAT5 cables, intercom, alarm, telco
    cables and a pull line. Yell at the builder for being cheap.

    >I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    >works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help.

    It should help somewhat.

    >The PC is a Dell.
    >I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    >shielding.

    I resell quite a few Dell computahs. I bit pricy but much better than
    some other system vendors products.

    Good luck.

    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice Skype: JeffLiebermann
    # http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS
    # http://802.11junk.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # jeffl@cruzio.com
  18. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Surprised no one has mentioned the firmware hacks that are available
    for this model.
    Also is the router itself in a clear space ?


    The sveasoft ine allows a power boost if this will help.
    David Taylor wrote:
    > > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > > length.
    >
    > Normal is 5m for USB though you can chain 5 x 5m active cables to go
    > 25m. However, the cost of 5 active cables would make pulling 25m of
    > CAT5 seem extremely cheap! :)
    >
    > David.
  19. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > length.

    Normal is 5m for USB though you can chain 5 x 5m active cables to go
    25m. However, the cost of 5 active cables would make pulling 25m of
    CAT5 seem extremely cheap! :)

    David.
  20. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    The house is new to me. It was built ~1950 and expanded a few times so we
    have a mixed bag of construction styles, wiring and plumbing.

    I've been reviewing the layout outside and as a long term solution I may run
    cat5 to the attic outside, then down to all the bedrooms. The side of the
    house my router is on cannot be seen from the street or the next door
    neighbors. There is already coax cable lines going up there.

    Jon

    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:vpjch1t8nchtf74srtivt4oamq66k2ea4v@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 17:30:42 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in.
    Running
    > >cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.
    >
    > A brand new house and nobody thought to run CAT5 and other cable? I'm
    > playing advisor to a homebuilder that want his houses ready for just
    > about anything electronic that might be needed. I convinced him to
    > run conduit instead of cable (it's cheaper) in the walls and let the
    > buyers decide on what's needed. He ran 3/4 blue FNT "smurf tube" and
    > the first few buyers are complaining that it's difficult to cram in
    > RG-6/u (satellite and CATV), 3 CAT5 cables, intercom, alarm, telco
    > cables and a pull line. Yell at the builder for being cheap.
    >
    > >I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    > >works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help.
    >
    > It should help somewhat.
    >
    > >The PC is a Dell.
    > >I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    > >shielding.
    >
    > I resell quite a few Dell computahs. I bit pricy but much better than
    > some other system vendors products.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    > # 831.336.2558 voice Skype: JeffLiebermann
    > # http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS
    > # http://802.11junk.com
    > # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > # jeffl@cruzio.com
  21. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Yes, the router is now sitting on top of a hutch about seven feet off the
    floor near a doorway to the center hall. Moving it across the room allowed
    the bedroom PC to connect and stay connected, albeit with a low signal.

    Jon

    <frankdowling1@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1125583121.424559.193290@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > Surprised no one has mentioned the firmware hacks that are available
    > for this model.
    > Also is the router itself in a clear space ?
    >
    >
    > The sveasoft ine allows a power boost if this will help.
    > David Taylor wrote:
    > > > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > > > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > > > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > > > length.
    > >
    > > Normal is 5m for USB though you can chain 5 x 5m active cables to go
    > > 25m. However, the cost of 5 active cables would make pulling 25m of
    > > CAT5 seem extremely cheap! :)
    > >
    > > David.
    >
  22. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Hmmm, moving the laptop 10 or 12 feet closer to the door improves the signal
    a significantly. I have my daughter's USB adapter I could try it out with.
    She left it home when she took her computer to school as the dorms are
    networked.

    One more good suggestion to try.

    Jon

    "Floyd L. Davidson" <floyd@apaflo.com> wrote in message
    news:874q951kfu.fld@barrow.com...
    > "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in.
    Running
    > >cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.
    >
    > You can run coax... but not very far unless you buy some *very*
    > good coax (which is about 1/2" or more diameter).
    >
    > But one other possibility that hasn't been mentioned is to put
    > in a WRT54G and use it in client mode. Then you don't need to
    > run coax, but instead can place the WRT54G at some location
    > where the signal is good enough, and run CAT5 to the computer
    > (use one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port). I don't remember
    > if the Linksys firmware has client mode or if you need to
    > install third party firmware, but that makes little difference
    > because you'd want the third party firmware anyway.
    >
    > Along the same lines, a lot of people have used USB wireless
    > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > length.
    >
    > >I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    > >works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a
    Dell.
    > >I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    > >shielding.
    >
    > Even just moving it a foot or so up above the computer case
    > should have a dramatic effect. However, since you say the
    > laptop doesn't get a good signal there either, it probably won't
    > be enough. Certainly worth trying though.
    >
    > --
    > Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    > Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd@apaflo.com
  23. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Thu, 1 Sep 2005 10:50:27 -0400, "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >The house is new to me. It was built ~1950 and expanded a few times so we
    >have a mixed bag of construction styles, wiring and plumbing.

    Ah, the Winchester Mystery house style of construction.

    >There is already coax cable lines going up there.

    Good. You might want to use the coax for networking. If you have
    access to both ends, just get a 10base2 (Cheapernet) converter or old
    hub with a BNC connector, to convert between the CAT5 and the coax.
    You can use RG-6/u as long as you don't put any taps along the line.
    There are also commercial products to share the LAN and CATV.
    http://www.multilet.com/us/baseband/product_range/product_range.htm
    I've ranted on the topic of using RG-6/u for networking in this
    newsgrup at last 3 times. Use Google Groups to find the articles if
    interested.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  24. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    OK, I used a few USB cables strung together to put the WUSB54G near the
    door. Got an excellent signal at 54mb/s. Looks like the way to go.

    So I ordered 2 16' active cables from Newegg. I'll put the PCI card into my
    daughter's desktop when she brings it home for winter break.

    Jon

    "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3nojadF2j9i2U1@individual.net...
    > Hmmm, moving the laptop 10 or 12 feet closer to the door improves the
    > signal
    > a significantly. I have my daughter's USB adapter I could try it out with.
    > She left it home when she took her computer to school as the dorms are
    > networked.
    >
    > One more good suggestion to try.
    >
    > Jon
    >
    > "Floyd L. Davidson" <floyd@apaflo.com> wrote in message
    > news:874q951kfu.fld@barrow.com...
    >> "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> >I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in.
    > Running
    >> >cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.
    >>
    >> You can run coax... but not very far unless you buy some *very*
    >> good coax (which is about 1/2" or more diameter).
    >>
    >> But one other possibility that hasn't been mentioned is to put
    >> in a WRT54G and use it in client mode. Then you don't need to
    >> run coax, but instead can place the WRT54G at some location
    >> where the signal is good enough, and run CAT5 to the computer
    >> (use one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port). I don't remember
    >> if the Linksys firmware has client mode or if you need to
    >> install third party firmware, but that makes little difference
    >> because you'd want the third party firmware anyway.
    >>
    >> Along the same lines, a lot of people have used USB wireless
    >> clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    >> used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    >> right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    >> length.
    >>
    >> >I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    >> >works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a
    > Dell.
    >> >I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    >> >shielding.
    >>
    >> Even just moving it a foot or so up above the computer case
    >> should have a dramatic effect. However, since you say the
    >> laptop doesn't get a good signal there either, it probably won't
    >> be enough. Certainly worth trying though.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    >> Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd@apaflo.com
    >
    >
  25. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 14:49:25 +0000 (UTC), dold@XReXXNeedX.usenet.us.com wrote:

    >Zeppo <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
    >> desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    >> connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    >
    >> At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    >> wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    >> downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    >> She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    >> second per the linksys utility.
    >
    >If you have a low signal, a reflector will likely fix the problem.
    >
    >http://www.freeantennas.com EZ-12, printed on photo paper for thick stock,
    >with aluminum foil glued to the sail, provides a substantial boost in
    >signal. http://www.rahul.net/dold/clarence/EZ12-windsurfer.jpg

    120 mbs is nothing to sneeze at.

    >
    >---
    >Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5

    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
  26. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Barry OGrady wrote:
    > On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 14:49:25 +0000 (UTC), dold@XReXXNeedX.usenet.us.com wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Zeppo <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have a small wireless network I've just moved into my new house. I had a
    >>>desktop hardwired to a Linksys WRT54G, with a desktop and a laptop
    >>>connecting to the wireless network at my old house.
    >>
    >>>At the new house I'm connecting 2 more laptops and my wife's desktop via
    >>>wireless and I've run into a snag. The router is at one end of the house
    >>>downstairs and wifey's desktop is upstairs at the other end of the house.
    >>>She connects, but it reads low signal and wavers between 12 MB and 24 MB a
    >>>second per the linksys utility.
    >>
    >>If you have a low signal, a reflector will likely fix the problem.
    >>
    >>http://www.freeantennas.com EZ-12, printed on photo paper for thick stock,
    >>with aluminum foil glued to the sail, provides a substantial boost in
    >>signal. http://www.rahul.net/dold/clarence/EZ12-windsurfer.jpg
    >
    >
    > 120 mbs is nothing to sneeze at.
    >
    >
    >>---
    >>Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
    >
    >
    > Barry
    > =====
    > Home page
    > http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og


    Look here to update the linksys firmware and gets lots more power out of
    the router you have.

    www.sveasoft.com

    for $20 its worth it I think.
  27. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On 2005-09-01, Floyd L. Davidson <floyd@apaflo.com> wrote:
    > "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in. Running
    >>cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.
    >
    > You can run coax... but not very far unless you buy some *very*
    > good coax (which is about 1/2" or more diameter).
    >
    > But one other possibility that hasn't been mentioned is to put
    > in a WRT54G and use it in client mode. Then you don't need to
    > run coax, but instead can place the WRT54G at some location
    > where the signal is good enough, and run CAT5 to the computer
    > (use one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port). I don't remember
    > if the Linksys firmware has client mode or if you need to
    > install third party firmware, but that makes little difference
    > because you'd want the third party firmware anyway.
    >
    > Along the same lines, a lot of people have used USB wireless
    > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > length.
    >

    Another option is the ASUS WL-330G. It's about the size of a deck of
    playing cards. It has two modes: Access Point or Ethernet gateway.
    I've used two of them in Ethernet gateway mode at separate locations
    to do exactly what you're
    suggesting above. i.e. connect a run of CAT5 to the device, and place
    it in a part of the room with better reception than where the desktop PC
    is located. It works pretty well.

    Jeff


    >>I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    >>works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a Dell.
    >>I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    >>shielding.
    >
    > Even just moving it a foot or so up above the computer case
    > should have a dramatic effect. However, since you say the
    > laptop doesn't get a good signal there either, it probably won't
    > be enough. Certainly worth trying though.
    >
  28. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Meant to report back with how things went..
    I strung 2 Active USB cables prom the PC to behind a nightstand by the door
    in the opposite corner of the room. I mounted the WUSB54G behind the
    nightstand using the velcro strip that came with it.

    I'm now getting an excellent signal @ 54mb/s. No disconnects and speedtests
    from various Speakeasy test sites read the same as the desktop PC hardwired
    to the router downstairs.

    Thanks for everyone's help and suggestions. This was fun.

    Regards,
    Jon

    "Jeff McWilliams" <Jeff.McWilliams@NO.SPAM.clanmcwilliams.org> wrote in
    message news:slrndi5qlv.7vn.Jeff.McWilliams@heavy3.home.int...
    > On 2005-09-01, Floyd L. Davidson <floyd@apaflo.com> wrote:
    > > "Zeppo" <zeppo_m@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >>I was talking about running coax within the room the desktop is in.
    Running
    > >>cat5 to the router would be a major project in our new house.
    > >
    > > You can run coax... but not very far unless you buy some *very*
    > > good coax (which is about 1/2" or more diameter).
    > >
    > > But one other possibility that hasn't been mentioned is to put
    > > in a WRT54G and use it in client mode. Then you don't need to
    > > run coax, but instead can place the WRT54G at some location
    > > where the signal is good enough, and run CAT5 to the computer
    > > (use one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port). I don't remember
    > > if the Linksys firmware has client mode or if you need to
    > > install third party firmware, but that makes little difference
    > > because you'd want the third party firmware anyway.
    > >
    > > Along the same lines, a lot of people have used USB wireless
    > > clients in the same way. I'm not sure how much USB cable can be
    > > used, but the specs suggest at least 15 feet if I remember
    > > right, though I'd expect it might work with a good bit more
    > > length.
    > >
    >
    > Another option is the ASUS WL-330G. It's about the size of a deck of
    > playing cards. It has two modes: Access Point or Ethernet gateway.
    > I've used two of them in Ethernet gateway mode at separate locations
    > to do exactly what you're
    > suggesting above. i.e. connect a run of CAT5 to the device, and place
    > it in a part of the room with better reception than where the desktop PC
    > is located. It works pretty well.
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    > >>I'm going to do a short cable with a homemade reflector and see how that
    > >>works. Getting the antenna from behind the PC has to help. The PC is a
    Dell.
    > >>I've never loved their PCs but the cases they pack them in have great
    > >>shielding.
    > >
    > > Even just moving it a foot or so up above the computer case
    > > should have a dramatic effect. However, since you say the
    > > laptop doesn't get a good signal there either, it probably won't
    > > be enough. Certainly worth trying though.
    > >
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