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How long can my eithernet cable to my modem be?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 21, 2005 6:05:42 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Ive got a wireless router that I use for broadband with my home laptop.
The router is in a cupboard under the stairs and I get good reception
all over the house.

When I bring my work laptop home I use the same wireless network card
so I can work with the laptop in the study.

Trouble is our IT department has spotted the drivers for the wireless
card and made me remove them (spoil sports!)

All is not lost as my broadband router accepts an eithernet cable and
works fine like this, but means I have to work in the sitting room
which is less than ideal.

I would like to run an eithernet cable up from the router to the study,
but wondered how long this sort of cable can be?

If it cant be more than a few meters then ill have to extend the phone
line and relocate the router, but id rather not do this.


Thanks for any help

David Bevan
http://www.davidbevan.co.uk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 21, 2005 11:51:33 PM

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junk1@davidbevan.co.uk wrote:
[SNIP]
>
> Trouble is our IT department has spotted the drivers for the wireless
> card and made me remove them (spoil sports!)
>
[SNIP]

Your employer's IT department clearly doesn't have enough real work to
do or enough actual threats to fight.....jeepers!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 2:11:45 AM

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In alt.internet.wireless junk1@davidbevan.co.uk wrote:
> Trouble is our IT department has spotted the drivers for the wireless
> card and made me remove them (spoil sports!)

> All is not lost as my broadband router accepts an eithernet cable and
> works fine like this, but means I have to work in the sitting room
> which is less than ideal.

Perhaps you want a "game adapter". These are sold to connect your X-box,
et al, wirelessly to the network, but it should work for your laptop
because it uses the drivers that you already have for the etherenet port.
Linksys WGA54G is one. Netgear WGE111 is another.

---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
Related resources
September 22, 2005 2:19:28 AM

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On 21 Sep 2005 14:05:42 -0700, junk1@davidbevan.co.uk scrawled:

>I would like to run an eithernet cable up from the router to the study,
>but wondered how long this sort of cable can be?
>
>If it cant be more than a few meters then ill have to extend the phone
>line and relocate the router, but id rather not do this.
>
From point to point, 100 metres is the maximum.
--
Stuart @ SJW Electrical

Please Reply to group
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 2:19:29 AM

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Lurch <usenet@sjwelectrical.co.uk> wrote in
news:4ij3j19ff6qn6q9hnl17ae44gvpr9gdo9l@4ax.com:

> On 21 Sep 2005 14:05:42 -0700, junk1@davidbevan.co.uk scrawled:
>
>>I would like to run an eithernet cable up from the router to the study,
>>but wondered how long this sort of cable can be?
>>
>>If it cant be more than a few meters then ill have to extend the phone
>>line and relocate the router, but id rather not do this.
>>
> From point to point, 100 metres is the maximum.

100 meters is the maximum distance to meet full spec. Ethernet will go some
further as well, with diminished speed, provided it's good cable, and half
way decent gear.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 2:19:30 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 17:10:45 -0500, DanS
<t.h.i.s.n.t.h.a.t@a.d.e.l.p.h.i.a..n.e.t> wrote:

>100 meters is the maximum distance to meet full spec. Ethernet will go some
>further as well, with diminished speed, provided it's good cable, and half
>way decent gear.

Yep. I have lots of fun putting connectors on the ends of a 1000ft
roll of CAT5 and demonstrating to the non-believers that it works just
fine. That catch is that it only works well at 10mbits/sec but not at
100mbits/sec. If you're going to play line stretcher, do it at 10 not
100.

The limiting factor is what's called NEXT or near end crosstalk, which
rips on the signal to noise ratio. 11dB is the minimum and 1000ft
just barely can do that with 10baseTX-HDX (half-duplex). Anyway, I
have a 900ft run of CAT5 at a customers that's been working for about
3 years without much difficulties (except where the mice chewed
through it).


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 22, 2005 2:56:49 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

< wrote in message
> Ive got a wireless router that I use for broadband with my home laptop.
> The router is in a cupboard under the stairs and I get good reception
> all over the house.
>
> When I bring my work laptop home I use the same wireless network card
> so I can work with the laptop in the study.
>
> Trouble is our IT department has spotted the drivers for the wireless
> card and made me remove them (spoil sports!)
>
> All is not lost as my broadband router accepts an eithernet cable and
> works fine like this, but means I have to work in the sitting room
> which is less than ideal.
>
> I would like to run an eithernet cable up from the router to the study,
> but wondered how long this sort of cable can be?
>
> If it cant be more than a few meters then ill have to extend the phone
> line and relocate the router, but id rather not do this.
>
>
> Thanks for any help
>
> David Bevan

Wireless bridge.

Certainly $40 is worth not walking around the house on a leash. :^)

Cheers
Eric
September 22, 2005 2:58:59 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

"Eric" wrote in message

>
> Wireless bridge.

Er, meant, "Wireless-Ethernet Adapter", of course.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 5:02:03 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

In article <TAlYe.15653$ib1.7892@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com>,
nospam@nospam.nospam.not says...
>
> "Eric" wrote in message
>
> >
> > Wireless bridge.
>
> Er, meant, "Wireless-Ethernet Adapter", of course.
>
Are you sure you didn't mean wireless-to-ethernet bridge?
:-)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 11:31:42 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> Your employer's IT department clearly doesn't have enough real work to
> do or enough actual threats to fight.....jeepers!

I disagree. Windows usually gets a bad name because people find it
unstable etc. The *only* thing that causes a blue screen kernel stop is
kernel mode code, i.e. things like drivers. People get a fresh XP and
then start loading on all kinds of code from various origins and then
complain when one of them barfs and brings down the OS.

To help combat this, Microsoft introduced the concept of signed drivers,
ones that had been through WHQL (lab testing) and thus had passed
validation. If the policy (either hard or soft) is to only run signed
drivers then so be it and it doesn't help the IT department one bit when
people load on unknown unsupported drivers.

From a security point of view this also raises alerts. Lets assume that
the IT department are doing rather well in locking down and securing the
network. Then in comes Joe Bloggs, loads up some drivers for the
inbuilt wireless card and creates an ad-hoc network with no encryption.
All Joe Hacker has to do now is sit in the car park with a high gain
antenna and target that nice corp laptop with the open wireless
connection. Makes that rather expensive firewall with annual
maintenance contract and trained staff to administer it all rather
pointless!

If the company has a "no wireless" policy then that should be both
accepted by staff and enforced by the company by using monitoring tools
and appropriate countermeasures.

FWIW, I don't agree with a no wireless policy because way too often it's
not enforced and just dealt with by publishing it on a piece of paper or
an intranet and that just doesn't stop staff members plugging in the
occassional AP now and again. Better to have a wireless policy and
control it effectively. Prime example, I was talking to a non techy at
a trade show yesterday, he said "we aren't allowed wireless but it's
just so much easier, I just bring in an access point and use it in the
meeting rooms when I need to". So if anyone wants to hack into one of
the worldwide manufacturers of copiers and digital cameras, there you
go.

David.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 1:31:20 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On 21 Sep 2005 14:05:42 -0700, junk1@davidbevan.co.uk wrote:

>Ive got a wireless router that I use for broadband with my home laptop.
>The router is in a cupboard under the stairs and I get good reception
>all over the house.
>
>When I bring my work laptop home I use the same wireless network card
>so I can work with the laptop in the study.
>
>Trouble is our IT department has spotted the drivers for the wireless
>card and made me remove them (spoil sports!)
>
>All is not lost as my broadband router accepts an eithernet cable and
>works fine like this, but means I have to work in the sitting room
>which is less than ideal.
>
>I would like to run an eithernet cable up from the router to the study,
>but wondered how long this sort of cable can be?
>
>If it cant be more than a few meters then ill have to extend the phone
>line and relocate the router, but id rather not do this.

It can't be any meters but it can be up to 15 metres.

>
>
>Thanks for any help
>
>David Bevan
>http://www.davidbevan.co.uk

Barry
=====
Home page
http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 1:31:21 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Barry OGrady <atheist.xxx@gmail.com> wrote in
news:j9r3j153to7spv8lbf7c0r51vobas2e7fe@4ax.com:

> it can be up to 15 metres

....or using CAT5 UTP cabling, up to 100 metres
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 22, 2005 6:29:09 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

In alt.internet.wireless RWEmerson <foolish_consistency@hobgoblin.com> wrote:

> Your employer's IT department clearly doesn't have enough real work to
> do or enough actual threats to fight.....jeepers!

Easy to do. Our systems have some helpful little tool that reports the
version level of all drivers and certain applications. If your PC is
downrev on anything, a new version is pushed down for you.

Occasionally there's a little popup asking you to reboot because of a new
load.

Or maybe he left his WiFi card enabled and they have a policy against
wireless in the building. He didn't say how they noticed that the drivers
were detected.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8,-122.5
!